SkyscraperPage Forum

SkyscraperPage Forum (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/index.php)
-   City Compilations (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=87)
-   -   SAN DIEGO | Boom Rundown, Vol. 2 (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=126473)

HurricaneHugo Mar 4, 2023 5:46 AM

Anybody know what these cranes are building?

Not my picture, found on Reddit:

https://i.redd.it/w69b4dl42nla1.jpg

SamFlood Mar 4, 2023 2:32 PM

https://plandesignbuild.ucsd.edu/pro...t-Living-and-L


https://oxblue.com/archive/731ef846a...?ts=1659727837

HurricaneHugo Mar 4, 2023 6:55 PM

Oh I did not know that PCE already started construction!

Sorely needed student housing

Streamliner Mar 6, 2023 4:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 9882878)
Oh I did not know that PCE already started construction!

Sorely needed student housing

Yeah they were able to get that started quickly. On the other side of campus, they are planning another 2,400 beds (Ridge Walk North), and the Theater District project is pretty far along and will provide 2,000 beds.

Streamliner Mar 6, 2023 8:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Streamliner (Post 9884084)
Yeah they were able to get that started quickly. On the other side of campus, they are planning another 2,400 beds (Ridge Walk North), and the Theater District project is pretty far along and will provide 2,000 beds.

I just HurricaneHugo was referring to Pepper Canyon East, but it's Pepper Canyon West that started construction. That's the one in SamFlood's photo above. 1300 beds, 23 floors. Here's a render:

https://today.ucsd.edu/news_uploads/...on-housing.jpg

Ridge Walk North doesn't seem to have much online yet. But I found this one when googling:

https://www.henselphelps.com/wp-cont...LEVEL_DUSK.jpg

SamFlood Mar 7, 2023 12:25 AM

Children's park is still under construction after groundbreaking in May of 2021



https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...58848cb2_b.jpg



https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...d2b21b4e_b.jpg

Streamliner Mar 8, 2023 5:08 PM

I saw this article/video that was pretty interesting. I also posted it on the main City Discussions forum:


How one downtown rebounded from the pandemic, even as others struggle
BY ASH-HAR QURAISHI, AMY CORRAL, RYAN BEARD

MARCH 7, 2023 / 6:00 AM / CBS NEWS

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/san-die...ties-struggle/

Quote:

At the onset of the pandemic in the spring of 2020, downtowns across the country emptied out. Soft lockdowns, office closures and a massive shift to remote work meant businesses in the urban core that were traditionally dependent on the daily foot traffic of commuters were at risk of financial ruin.

In San Diego, a downtown economy dependent on tourism and convention-goers, restaurant owners were bracing for the worst.
Quote:

The city's downtown rebound is something of an anomaly. Many cities are struggling to entice remote workers and residents back to the urban core.

New data from researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Toronto indicates that most American downtowns are still struggling.

"We started the study early in the pandemic, as we noticed folks departing actually in New York City," said Karen Chapple, professor emerita of city and regional planning at UC Berkeley and the study's lead author. "That was our first case that we looked at was the New York City, the metropolitan area, realizing that folks were leaving for the exurbs, for rural small towns all over the region."

Chapple and her team analyzed those patterns using cell phone data in 62 downtowns. They studied how much activity there was before, during and after the pandemic.

"It's a very significant number of pings all over North America that we were able to collect, about 18 million pings," she said. "We record all kinds of activity, and that's what makes it better than, say, those office footfall indicators or office vacancy rates, which are only looking at office workers. We're looking at everybody who comes downtown."

San Diego, it turns out was near the top of the list by the end of 2022 — recovering 99% of its pre-pandemic activity.

"What San Diego did right is it made a 24/7 city," said Chapple.

That resiliency was due in part to economic plans that started long before COVID.

"There's decades of planning and a lot of thought that's gone into it. And that has made San Diego one of the most resilient cities in North America," said Chapple.
Quote:

One strategy that seems to have paid off was having a diverse job sector that continued to bring employees into their downtown workplaces. San Diego's downtown industries included food services, accommodations, education, and health care.

"Like they said about Bill Clinton, 'It's the economy, stupid,' because if you have the right mix of sectors, you're doing pretty well right now. But if you were too specialized, you might be suffering," said Chapple.

San Diego didn't over-specialize, whereas tech heavy cities ended up flatlining since many "techies" now work remotely.

"San Francisco might have been able to come back," she said. "It had a compromised hybrid work situation with its tech sector. But now it's going through the layoffs, and that's what's happening in in Los Angeles and Seattle and Portland and a few other tech places too."
Video Link

Andy-4-SD Mar 22, 2023 4:50 PM

UC San Diego to spend $1.1 billion to build huge student center and campus housing

https://www.lajollalight.com/news/st...campus-housing

A rendering depicts the Triton Center, which will house student services as well as health, alumni and outreach programs.
A rendering depicts the Triton Center, which will house student services as well as health, alumni and outreach programs. (UC San Diego)
The Triton Center is meant to become the beating heart of the university, and Ridgewalk North will become one of the school’s largest residential villages.
BY GARY ROBBINS
MARCH 22, 2023 8 AM PT
Facebook
Twitter
Show more sharing options
Continuing a decade-long boom, the University of California Board of Regents has given its San Diego campus in La Jolla permission to build a huge student center and a 2,400-bed housing complex that will jointly cost $1.1 billion.

The campus said it will start constructing the Triton Center and the Ridgewalk North Living and Learning Neighborhood this summer while the school is in the midst of building two other villages that will house 3,130 students.

Newsletter
Get the La Jolla Light weekly in your inbox

News, features and sports about La Jolla, every Thursday for free

Enter email address
Enter email address
SIGN ME UP
You may occasionally receive promotional content from the La Jolla Light.
The projects are part of a larger effort by the regents to accommodate thousands more students, primarily from California. Over the past decade, the system’s enrollment has soared by 55,610 students, hitting 294,309. The growth has caused a serious housing shortage.

“We’re very committed to expanding student housing,” said Rich Leib, a San Diego businessman who serves as chairman of the Board of Regents. “Studies have shown that students do better when they live close together. And the housing we’re talking about generally has rents that are 20 to 30 percent below market prices.”

A substantial portion of that growth is occurring at UCSD, which still has room to expand. The campus currently has about 43,000 students, up from 29,517 in fall 2013. Chancellor Pradeep Khosla says enrollment could reach 50,000 in about a decade.

The $428 million Triton Center complex will be composed of four buildings that will house everything from student health services to an alumni and welcome center. One of the buildings will include a 500-person event space and an art gallery.

A rendering shows the Ridgewalk North Living and Learning Neighborhood.
A rendering shows the Ridgewalk North Living and Learning Neighborhood.(UC San Diego )
In addition to 2,400 beds for undergraduates, Ridgewalk North will feature administrative and teaching space for Thurgood Marshall College, the School of Global Policy and Strategy and the Department of Economics, the campus said. There will be 19 new classrooms, a dining center and a 150-seat lecture hall.

The village will look like a small city. One of its buildings will be 18 stories tall, another will be 16 stories and a third will be 10. A separate academic building will rise to six stories. UCSD already is building six residential towers that range in height from 16 to 22 stories.

Ridgewalk North will be not far from Geisel Library. It is scheduled to open in late 2025. Triton Center, which will be close to a campus Blue Line trolley station, will open in 2026.

The projects are being built “in pursuit of the intellectual, physical and cultural transformation of our campus,” Khosla said in a statement. ◆

unpermitted_variance Mar 22, 2023 9:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy-4-SD (Post 9898899)
UC San Diego to spend $1.1 billion to build huge student center and campus housing

https://www.lajollalight.com/news/st...campus-housing


I've trawled around and there's only a couple renderings available and no site plans for the Ridgewalk development. The article includes this rendering:

https://ca-times.brightspotcdn.com/d...Fridgewalk.jpg

Buildings at 18, 16, 10 and 6 stories. Streamliner also shared another rendering a few posts up.


Project is to replace the Marshall Lower dorms and several academic and administration buildings.

Location:

https://i.imgur.com/pll54Tj.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/7LjPU7H.jpg


Triton Center has this rendering on UCSD's website:

https://plandesignbuild.ucsd.edu/_im...ton-Center.jpg

Here are a couple older renderings, not sure if they're still accurate to the scope of the project:

https://media.sandiegoreader.com/img...08e3fa67d9af9d

https://ca-times.brightspotcdn.com/d...architects.jpg


EYRC architects also has renderings for a "Triton Pavilion" on their site, I'm not sure if this is still current:

https://www.eyrc.com/hs-fs/hubfs/EYR...unity-ppt1.jpg


Triton Center location:

https://i.imgur.com/L2QlWm6.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/ibmy1gt.jpg


Overall, I'm surprised that the university hasn't released more detailed renderings and site plans yet; I recall much more having been publicly available when the Theater District project was approved by UC Regents in 2020.

These are the documents from the most recent Regents meeting:

Triton Center:
https://regents.universityofcaliforn...t/mar23/f8.pdf

Ridge Walk LLC:
https://regents.universityofcaliforn...t/mar23/f9.pdf


Overall, very exciting to see the university continue to modernize and urbanize. Students in 5-10 years will have an entirely different university experience from those of us who've already graduated.

Streamliner Mar 23, 2023 12:18 AM

The Ridge Walk North project has site plans and building cross sections in their CEQA documents:

https://plandesignbuild.ucsd.edu/pla...Impact-Reports

Ridge Walk is Addendum number 12 here. Site plans start on page 17 of the pdf. Addendum 11 is the Triton Center. I think that awesome EYRC rendering is from an earlier iteration. It would have been amazing though.

unpermitted_variance Mar 23, 2023 5:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Streamliner (Post 9899388)
The Ridge Walk North project has site plans and building cross sections in their CEQA documents:

https://plandesignbuild.ucsd.edu/pla...Impact-Reports

Ridge Walk is Addendum number 12 here. Site plans start on page 17 of the pdf. Addendum 11 is the Triton Center. I think that awesome EYRC rendering is from an earlier iteration. It would have been amazing though.

Great find Streamliner!

Here's some additional renderings and a site plan from the EIR addendum for Ridge Walk North:


https://i.imgur.com/8LiP61k.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/uJnnXn3.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/GEejdNm.jpg

Due to their height, location, and topography, these likely won't be nearly as visible as the other recent and ongoing tower projects at UCSD.

What's unclear in the plans is what's going to happen with the sites on the west side of Ridgewalk, currently home to the Marshall admin building and Sequoyah hall. They're set to be demolished, but the site plan is unclear on what the future use will be (aside from the location for the construction trailers).

Streamliner Mar 23, 2023 6:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unpermitted_variance (Post 9900047)
What's unclear in the plans is what's going to happen with the sites on the west side of Ridgewalk, currently home to the Marshall admin building and Sequoyah hall. They're set to be demolished, but the site plan is unclear on what the future use will be (aside from the location for the construction trailers).

From the Addendum, it looks like they are demolishing those two buildings, to be replaced by "a flexible use green space". Basically, definitely not a building, but nothing very specific either.

SamFlood Mar 26, 2023 5:31 AM

A few pics of Downtown

Courthouse
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...91ec31a1_h.jpg

Broadway
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...5ef23542_h.jpg

11th Broadway
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...a899d82b_h.jpg

8th and B
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...42609652_b.jpg

Streamliner Mar 27, 2023 8:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SamFlood (Post 9902225)
A few pics of Downtown

Courthouse

Broadway

11th Broadway

8th and B

^ I'm really glad to see all of these sizeable towers popping up around downtown. But honestly they all look the same. You could've told me all of those pictures were of the same building at different angles and I would have believed you. But thank you for posting construction pics. We don't get nearly enough of those

JSW Apr 3, 2023 4:35 AM

Some East Village action since this is the current hotspot for projects in their later phases, and I happen to have a good viewpoint for all of them.

After these finish, the next big round of big boys that take shape will be more in the Little Italy / Core Columbia area.

800 Broadway (Topped Off!)

https://i.imgur.com/4l0eBOW.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/SbiMuDJ.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/TKDgQtv.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/cPhstuq.jpg


Broadway Towers (Tower 2, 32 stories, slightly taller than tower 1)

https://i.imgur.com/Y74ybuh.jpg


Radian (topped off, Target @ base, now touring for leases)

https://i.imgur.com/S5Iigf9.jpg


8th & B (stalled but still U/C)
Still no major moves, but the crane and staff remains. Slow build up of thes truss structures, whatever they are. Not dead, just stalled for whatever reason.

https://i.imgur.com/tMWtyOo.jpg

Splosivo945 Apr 3, 2023 9:43 PM

As I understand it, 8th & B was going to be rentals and will now instead be condos - but the change has required them to file additional paperwork with the city which is delaying construction.

No idea how accurate that is but I heard it from someone at Bosa so I'm rolling with it

JSW Apr 4, 2023 3:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Splosivo945 (Post 9909266)
As I understand it, 8th & B was going to be rentals and will now instead be condos - but the change has required them to file additional paperwork with the city which is delaying construction.

No idea how accurate that is but I heard it from someone at Bosa so I'm rolling with it

Well that would actually make sense if it's true - thanks for chiming in! I figured it wasn't actually in trouble since they've kept the crane up with equipment on site etc. That can't be cheap to hold.

Streamliner Apr 4, 2023 4:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JSW (Post 9908724)
Some East Village action since this is the current hotspot for projects in their later phases, and I happen to have a good viewpoint for all of them.

After these finish, the next big round of big boys that take shape will be more in the Little Italy / Core Columbia area.

800 Broadway (Topped Off!)

https://i.imgur.com/4l0eBOW.jpg

That view looking east is pretty amazing if you think about it. 10 years ago this vantage point wouldn't have been much to look at. Now there's an actual skyline.

JSW Apr 5, 2023 3:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Streamliner (Post 9909788)
That view looking east is pretty amazing if you think about it. 10 years ago this vantage point wouldn't have been much to look at. Now there's an actual skyline.

Radically different even just from 2017 when I moved to SD. When people try to write off downtown as "not for locals, only for tourists" they show their ignorance about the biggest neighborhood of downtown: East Village. It already is, and rapidly becoming the party of the city that feels like its own ecosystem outside of the gaslamp (which is no longer just tourists or weekenders anyway) or the marina / waterfront, and Little Italy which never feel like they're neighborhoods with mostly locals.

East Village also gets a bad rap about people living on the sidewalks, but I will maintain that as a downtown resident for years, I've had worse and more frequent issues with drunk Padres fans. :shrug:

As a whole, this is the broad part of downtown to look at if you want to live in a central urban / lively area with lots of accessibility that actually feels like a neighborhood. Changing fast, and for the better. And lots of new high rise rentals with amazing views if that's your bag.

Splosivo945 Apr 7, 2023 1:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JSW (Post 9909522)
Well that would actually make sense if it's true - thanks for chiming in! I figured it wasn't actually in trouble since they've kept the crane up with equipment on site etc. That can't be cheap to hold.

Just heard that they are putting a sales office in for it on the corner of 8th and Broadway in the Diega building - confirming the change to condos


All times are GMT. The time now is 5:55 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.