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-   -   [Halifax] Flynn Flats (1363 Hollis) | 28 m | 7 fl | Completed (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=225283)

Jonovision Oct 7, 2016 12:36 AM

[Halifax] Flynn Flats (1363 Hollis) | 28 m | 7 fl | Completed
 
Dexel's newest proposal for the corner of Bishop and Hollis was presented last night at VivaCity and is going to design review committee for its initial presentation.

https://c4.staticflickr.com/6/5617/3...f8b32ee5_b.jpgHollis & bishop by Jonovision23, on Flickr

someone123 Oct 7, 2016 1:28 AM

That looks pretty nice but I think this area should probably be a heritage district already. If you look closely at the beige vinyl siding apartment buildings you'll see that they're quite old. They may have masonry construction on the upper floors and even if not they could look incredible if they were renovated in a way similar to a bunch of Hal Forbes projects.

Meanwhile this project or something similar could be built in many other locations with inferior buildings or no buildings.

teddifax Oct 7, 2016 2:21 AM

Where do we find out what happened at Vivacity this year?

Drybrain Oct 7, 2016 2:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 7586353)
That looks pretty nice but I think this area should probably be a heritage district already. If you look closely at the beige vinyl siding apartment buildings you'll see that they're quite old. They may have masonry construction on the upper floors and even if not they could look incredible if they were renovated in a way similar to a bunch of Hal Forbes projects.

Meanwhile this project or something similar could be built in many other locations with inferior buildings or no buildings.

Yeah, it's a good proposal but it's a terrible location for it. The building there now, properly restored, would be a beautiful period-appropriate complement to the city's second conservation district, and one of the most unique and interesting heritage districts in the country. Instead, it's just the usual flatten-and-rebuild. This is very nice, but you could build it anywhere. There aren't many mid 19th-century Italianate urban buildings in the city, or in Canada.

Dexel builds decent stuff, but the company's creativity in integrating old and new is totally inadequate to a city like this.

counterfactual Oct 7, 2016 2:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 7586353)
That looks pretty nice but I think this area should probably be a heritage district already. If you look closely at the beige vinyl siding apartment buildings you'll see that they're quite old. They may have masonry construction on the upper floors and even if not they could look incredible if they were renovated in a way similar to a bunch of Hal Forbes projects.

Meanwhile this project or something similar could be built in many other locations with inferior buildings or no buildings.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Drybrain (Post 7586401)
Yeah, it's a good proposal but it's a terrible location for it. The building there now, properly restored, would be a beautiful period-appropriate complement to the building across the street, and would really enhance the coming conservation district.

This is very nice, but you could build it anywhere. There aren't many early 19th-century Italianate urban buildings in Canada.

I see the stone masonry at street level on the Bishop street side of the beige house -- so, let me get this straight, someone put freaking vinyl beige siding on top of masonry and stone walls?!!?!?

yal Oct 7, 2016 2:52 AM

It is already pretty upsetting that Dexel is destroying the one of a kind wooden apartment building at the corner of Spring Garden and Robie and now this? Oh wait there is also a bunch on Barrington they would like to demolish.. When is the city going stand up and say "@#$ing enough!"? Probably never.. Dexel is doing nothing but pillaging the history all over the city.

Scumbags.

Dmajackson Oct 7, 2016 4:33 PM

Dexel is presenting this project to Design Review Committee next week.

It will be 40-unit residential building with a small retail unit facing Hollis Street. 12 new parking spaces accessed via the existing Waterton parkade entrance. Rooftop amenity space along with ground floor amenity space (some shared with Waterford). The height varies due to the steep grade along Bishop Street. That said it will be 28m from the main entrance on Hollis Street. Dexel is proposing to meet post-bonus requirements and the site plan does show underground utilities along Bishop Street.

Design Review Committee - Case 20296

ILoveHalifax Oct 7, 2016 6:01 PM

What a fabulous design - reminiscent of the library. Great to get rid of the old building (slum?) before it goes in flames with a number of fatalities.

Jonovision Oct 12, 2016 11:48 PM

I really like this new design, but I am concerned with what might be hiding under that layer of vinyl. Does anyone have a historic image of the streetscape?

pblaauw Oct 13, 2016 3:12 AM

[deleted]

pblaauw Oct 13, 2016 3:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jonovision (Post 7591754)
I really like this new design, but I am concerned with what might be hiding under that layer of vinyl. Does anyone have a historic image of the streetscape?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jonovision (Post 7591754)
I really like this new design, but I am concerned with what might be hiding under that layer of vinyl. Does anyone have a historic image of the streetscape?

This is the closest I could find. I think Marys Army and Navy Club is what was there, or the building to the left of it. (The NS Archives website says that's on Barrington, however.

OldDartmouthMark Oct 13, 2016 12:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Drybrain (Post 7586401)
Yeah, it's a good proposal but it's a terrible location for it. The building there now, properly restored, would be a beautiful period-appropriate complement to the city's second conservation district, and one of the most unique and interesting heritage districts in the country. Instead, it's just the usual flatten-and-rebuild. This is very nice, but you could build it anywhere. There aren't many mid 19th-century Italianate urban buildings in the city, or in Canada.

Dexel builds decent stuff, but the company's creativity in integrating old and new is totally inadequate to a city like this.

:yeahthat:

IanWatson Oct 14, 2016 10:01 AM

Anyone know how to direct link to an Archives image? This image shows the building at the corner of Hollis and Bishop. It's the one that has the granite foundation, but is now clad in beige siding.

OldDartmouthMark Oct 14, 2016 1:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IanWatson (Post 7593159)
Anyone know how to direct link to an Archives image? This image shows the building at the corner of Hollis and Bishop. It's the one that has the granite foundation, but is now clad in beige siding.

Click on the download 'button' - it will open the image in a new window, and you can post using that URL.

https://novascotia.ca/archives/image.../200402289.jpg

Ziobrop Oct 14, 2016 5:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark (Post 7593264)
Click on the download 'button' - it will open the image in a new window, and you can post using that URL.

https://novascotia.ca/archives/image.../200402289.jpg

quick look at streetview shows that the building there now, and in this photo have identical chimneys. looks like the brick fell into disrepair, so they parcged the back, and sided the front.

this would probably clean up really nicely. a Dylan like intervention here would be wonderful.

IanWatson Jan 12, 2017 12:51 PM

Didn't realize we had a thread for this one so I cross-posted on general updates:

Demo has started on the building at the corner of Hollis and Bishop. They seem to be doing it by hand.

DT Hfx Jan 13, 2017 8:05 PM

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/296/31...b32e32e0_b.jpg1363 Hollis 2017-1-13 by DwN~toWN Halifax, on Flickr

Demolition of 1363 Hollis with Alexander crane in background.

OldDartmouthMark Jan 13, 2017 10:51 PM

Thanks for posting. I'm not seeing brick in that photo, and is that wall perpendicular to the street made of poured concrete? Probably stucco over brick, I'm thinking

That said, I can see the plaster slats inside, the original doorway and what looks like granite at the entranceway and foundation? The old bars on the bottom windows are interesting as well.

Oh well, another one gone...

Jonovision Jan 15, 2017 4:55 PM

More of the demo.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/555/31...e368e50e_h.jpg20170112_134112_HDR by Jonovision23, on Flickr

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/387/32...e1d1049f_h.jpg20170112_134306_HDR by Jonovision23, on Flickr

Jonovision Jan 20, 2017 9:49 PM

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/692/32...59759ead_h.jpg20170120_154157_HDR by Jonovision23, on Flickr

portapetey Jan 21, 2017 2:19 AM

I'm not one of those "tear it down!" people, but this one just doesn't feel like any loss to me. It's a plain beige box with no interesting architectural features at all.

fenwick16 Jan 21, 2017 4:05 AM

This one looks great. It is too bad the old place is being torn down, but this is a big upgrade over what was there.

Phalanx Jan 21, 2017 4:17 AM

Are they demolishing before approval, or has this gone beyond the 'proposed' status on the thread?

kph06 Jan 21, 2017 5:59 PM

This is pretty well down now.

someone123 Jan 21, 2017 8:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by portapetey (Post 7685037)
I'm not one of those "tear it down!" people, but this one just doesn't feel like any loss to me. It's a plain beige box with no interesting architectural features at all.

It is not a landmark building but I think there are a few things to question about this.

The southern end of Hollis Street could and should be part of a heritage district, and "background" buildings contribute a lot to the character of the area in aggregate even if no single building makes or breaks the neighbourhood. Schmidtville is the same way; you could argue that no single building there is critical, but together they create a distinctive heritage district.

We hear arguments all the time about how it isn't economical to save these buildings, but really they are arguments about how it is more profitable to tear them down and build something larger. This reasoning ignores the public good. In a city like Halifax where there are empty lots all over the place it is crazy to accept that we cannot support the 3% of the metro area (or whatever it is) that has buildings like this.

Another factor here is that the developer has wanted to tear down this building for a while, so they have no incentive to make the building look good and in fact probably have an incentive to let it get run down so that fewer people see it as a loss. There are other buildings of this style around the city that are well-maintained, have colourful wooden cladding, and look great. They have a fine-grained scale, good proportions, and features like the granite foundation that we are not likely to see in new construction.

portapetey Jan 21, 2017 8:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 7685507)
It is not a landmark building but I think there are a few things to question about this.

The southern end of Hollis Street could and should be part of a heritage district, and "background" buildings contribute a lot to the character of the area in aggregate even if no single building makes or breaks the neighbourhood. Schmidtville is the same way; you could argue that no single building there is critical, but together they create a distinctive heritage district.

We hear arguments all the time about how it isn't economical to save these buildings, but really they are arguments about how it is more profitable to tear them down and build something larger. This reasoning ignores the public good. In a city like Halifax where there are empty lots all over the place it is crazy to accept that we cannot support the 3% of the metro area (or whatever it is) that has buildings like this.

Another factor here is that the developer has wanted to tear down this building for a while, so they have no incentive to make the building look good and in fact probably have an incentive to let it get run down so that fewer people see it as a loss. There are other buildings of this style around the city that are well-maintained, have colourful wooden cladding, and look great. They have a fine-grained scale, good proportions, and features like the granite foundation that we are not likely to see in new construction.

This is a good explanation, thanks. I still won't shed a tear for this particular building, but I get where you're coming from.

Colin May Jan 21, 2017 9:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ILoveHalifax (Post 7587046)
What a fabulous design - reminiscent of the library. Great to get rid of the old building (slum?) before it goes in flames with a number of fatalities.

If you think it was a 'slum' you must have a very low opinion of the owner as it has been owned by Mr Lawen,Dexel, for over 5 years.
Older character buildings which he bought quite cheaply have more than paid off the original purchase cost and maintenance.

Everyone should go down to Young Avenue and see the destruction wrought by a real slum landlord - who lives in a mansion at 623 Shore Drive Bedford, see here http://www.viewpoint.ca/sidebarmap#!

Drybrain Jan 21, 2017 9:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 7685507)
It is not a landmark building but I think there are a few things to question about this.

The southern end of Hollis Street could and should be part of a heritage district, and "background" buildings contribute a lot to the character of the area in aggregate even if no single building makes or breaks the neighbourhood. Schmidtville is the same way; you could argue that no single building there is critical, but together they create a distinctive heritage district.

We hear arguments all the time about how it isn't economical to save these buildings, but really they are arguments about how it is more profitable to tear them down and build something larger. This reasoning ignores the public good. In a city like Halifax where there are empty lots all over the place it is crazy to accept that we cannot support the 3% of the metro area (or whatever it is) that has buildings like this.

Another factor here is that the developer has wanted to tear down this building for a while, so they have no incentive to make the building look good and in fact probably have an incentive to let it get run down so that fewer people see it as a loss. There are other buildings of this style around the city that are well-maintained, have colourful wooden cladding, and look great. They have a fine-grained scale, good proportions, and features like the granite foundation that we are not likely to see in new construction.

Indeed. I'm sure that if this building looked anything like its original appearance, the conversation would be quite different. It was also harmonious in style and form with the larger building of a similar era across the street.

Keith P. Jan 22, 2017 12:44 AM

It is the natural life cycle of most wood-frame buildings to decline over time as they wear out, their use changes, and eventually be replaced. Halifax fights change at every turn so this reaction seen above is no real surprise. We need to get over the stereotype that "old=good" just as much as we need to get over the "tall building=bad" mindset locally.

It's funny because I had a similar thought earlier today before reading this thread as I was driving along Dutch Village Rd. I observed the new development on the site of the old Halifax West, the new building going up at the foot of Rufus, the new building at the intersection with Bayers, and of course the newish Fares development at the southern end,. These are surrounded by some run-down 1960s small wooden apartment buildings along with grow-op shops, various sketchy rental properties and businesses, and other eyesores. This is really no different than what is being talked about above. Those structures I mentioned were probably quite nice when new. But why would anyone want to save them now?

Drybrain Jan 22, 2017 1:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Keith P. (Post 7685670)
It is the natural life cycle of most wood-frame buildings to decline over time as they wear out, their use changes, and eventually be replaced. Halifax fights change at every turn so this reaction seen above is no real surprise. We need to get over the stereotype that "old=good" just as much as we need to get over the "tall building=bad" mindset locally.

It's funny because I had a similar thought earlier today before reading this thread as I was driving along Dutch Village Rd. I observed the new development on the site of the old Halifax West, the new building going up at the foot of Rufus, the new building at the intersection with Bayers, and of course the newish Fares development at the southern end,. These are surrounded by some run-down 1960s small wooden apartment buildings along with grow-op shops, various sketchy rental properties and businesses, and other eyesores. This is really no different than what is being talked about above. Those structures I mentioned were probably quite nice when new. But why would anyone want to save them now?

Halifax has older wood-framed buildings than this. Lots of places do. New England towns and cities are full of them. Keep mold at bay and they can last for centuries. Here's the old town of Goslar, Germany, which dates back to the 16th century.

ILoveHalifax Jan 22, 2017 3:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Colin May (Post 7685527)
If you think it was a 'slum' you must have a very low opinion of the owner as it has been owned by Mr Lawen,Dexel, for over 5 years.
Older character buildings which he bought quite cheaply have more than paid off the original purchase cost and maintenance.

Everyone should go down to Young Avenue and see the destruction wrought by a real slum landlord - who lives in a mansion at 623 Shore Drive Bedford, see here http://www.viewpoint.ca/sidebarmap#!

I was in that building about 5 years ago and I came out feeling like I needed a shower. I don't know Lawen Dexel and have no opinion of him so please don't tell me how I feel about him

OldDartmouthMark Jan 22, 2017 6:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Drybrain (Post 7685707)
Halifax has older wood-framed buildings than this. Lots of places do. New England towns and cities are full of them. Keep mold at bay and they can last for centuries. Here's the old town of Goslar, Germany, which dates back to the 16th century.

Unfortunately there are many people in the world who don't have the ability to understand the importance of historic structures. You can't teach it to them, they will never get it. Some are just uber-practical and some just plain don't understand and don't want to understand. They have no vision - they just see something old and can't picture the potential in the building - just tear it down and build something new, keeping in step with the rest of our throw-away society that has helped put the world in the state it is in now.

Then there are those who feel that making the most money possible is the only thing of importance, regardless of its effect on the rest of the population or the city in general. Philanthropists they are not.

For some reason, Halifax seems to have a higher percentage of all those mentioned above than other cities. It's perplexing that a city with such a long and rich history (for North America, anyhow) has so many people who don't know enough to appreciate it. Shameful, really.

fenwick16 Jan 22, 2017 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark (Post 7685884)
Unfortunately there are many people in the world who don't have the ability to understand the importance of historic structures. You can't teach it to them, they will never get it. Some are just uber-practical and some just plain don't understand and don't want to understand. They have no vision - they just see something old and can't picture the potential in the building - just tear it down and build something new, keeping in step with the rest of our throw-away society that has helped put the world in the state it is in now.

Then there are those who feel that making the most money possible is the only thing of importance, regardless of its effect on the rest of the population or the city in general. Philanthropists they are not.

For some reason, Halifax seems to have a higher percentage of all those mentioned above than other cities. It's perplexing that a city with such a long and rich history (for North America, anyhow) has so many people who don't know enough to appreciate it. Shameful, really.


It depends on the building being torn down. The one being torn down at 1363 Hollis Street doesn't get much appreciation because it is a rather unattractive building that isn't even that old. Replacing it with something attractive and new, as in the rendering below (originally posted by Jonovision), is easy to accept.

In my opinion, these are a couple of great re-purposed complexes - https://haligonia.ca/rbc-waterside-c...ater-st-82074/ and http://doorsopenhalifax.com/founders-square/ . Although some consider these complexes to be facadism, the streetscape was saved, and old, poorly functioning buildings were replaced with modern, useful buildings. There are many cities where the old buildings would have been demolished.

There are buildings that should be saved. The building that the Halifax AGNS is located in, is a beautiful, old building but even so, there are people who want a new, bigger, modern building which will leave a beautiful, historic building vacant. In my opinion, that is the type of building that people should be supporting.

Overall, in spite of some mistakes, Halifax in 2017 is a far more attractive city than Halifax in the early 1970's (which is the earliest that I can remember the city). I remember the old ferries, which were fun to take across the Harbour and while the old ferry terminals were somewhat decrepit, they were welcoming like an entrance gate to an old stadium with its turnstiles. Purdy's wharf was an actual wharf and warehouse, but it was nowhere near as impressive as the current Purdy's Wharf office complex. In the early 1970's Halifax didn't have its current boardwalk, which has made the harbour-front accessible and is enjoyed by locals and tourists. In short, Halifax has lost some old buildings, and made some mistakes such as the Scotia Square super-block and Cogswell Interchange, but even so, it is a far more attractive and interesting city than it was in the early 1970's. Let's give the city leaders credit for being progressively minded in its desire to tear down the Cogswell Interchange and restore the street grid, and for all the other great changes that the city has seen over the past 40 plus years. Cheers to Halifax, a great city that keeps becoming even better.

https://c4.staticflickr.com/6/5617/3...f8b32ee5_b.jpg

kph06 Jan 22, 2017 2:09 PM

Some more renderings are available on the Dexel Site. This also appears to named "The Bishop".

http://payload452.cargocollective.co...ENTRY_1750.jpg
http://payload452.cargocollective.co...ACADE_1750.jpg
http://payload452.cargocollective.co...ARGED_1750.jpg
http://payload452.cargocollective.co...ENTRY_1750.jpg
Source

fenwick16 Jan 22, 2017 2:24 PM

The renderings look good. I hope this will be approved soon so they can start construction.

Keith P. Jan 22, 2017 3:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fenwick16 (Post 7685989)
It depends on the building being torn down. The one being torn down at 1363 Hollis Street doesn't get much appreciation because it is a rather unattractive building that isn't even that old. Replacing it with something attractive and new, as in the rendering below (originally posted by Jonovision), is easy to accept.

In my opinion, these are a couple of great re-purposed complexes - https://haligonia.ca/rbc-waterside-c...ater-st-82074/ and http://doorsopenhalifax.com/founders-square/ . Although some consider these complexes to be facadism, the streetscape was saved, and old, poorly functioning buildings were replaced with modern, useful buildings. There are many cities where the old buildings would have been demolished.

There are buildings that should be saved. The building that the Halifax AGNS is located in, is a beautiful, old building but even so, there are people who want a new, bigger, modern building which will leave a beautiful, historic building vacant. In my opinion, that is the type of building that people should be supporting.

Sums it up nicely.

Jonovision Jan 22, 2017 5:25 PM

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/280/32...a950179a_h.jpg20170122_124005_HDR by Jonovision23, on Flickr

someone123 Jan 22, 2017 10:35 PM

Does the rendering show preserved granite blocks from the foundation of the old corner building? That would be a nice feature.

I like the design of the new building, but I remain unconvinced that the amount of demolition of older buildings happening right now is necessary or ideal from the public's perspective.

OldDartmouthMark Jan 23, 2017 5:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fenwick16 (Post 7685989)
It depends on the building being torn down. The one being torn down at 1363 Hollis Street doesn't get much appreciation because it is a rather unattractive building that isn't even that old. Replacing it with something attractive and new, as in the rendering below (originally posted by Jonovision), is easy to accept.

In my opinion, these are a couple of great re-purposed complexes - https://haligonia.ca/rbc-waterside-c...ater-st-82074/ and http://doorsopenhalifax.com/founders-square/ . Although some consider these complexes to be facadism, the streetscape was saved, and old, poorly functioning buildings were replaced with modern, useful buildings. There are many cities where the old buildings would have been demolished.

There are buildings that should be saved. The building that the Halifax AGNS is located in, is a beautiful, old building but even so, there are people who want a new, bigger, modern building which will leave a beautiful, historic building vacant. In my opinion, that is the type of building that people should be supporting.

Overall, in spite of some mistakes, Halifax in 2017 is a far more attractive city than Halifax in the early 1970's (which is the earliest that I can remember the city). I remember the old ferries, which were fun to take across the Harbour and while the old ferry terminals were somewhat decrepit, they were welcoming like an entrance gate to an old stadium with its turnstiles. Purdy's wharf was an actual wharf and warehouse, but it was nowhere near as impressive as the current Purdy's Wharf office complex. In the early 1970's Halifax didn't have its current boardwalk, which has made the harbour-front accessible and is enjoyed by locals and tourists. In short, Halifax has lost some old buildings, and made some mistakes such as the Scotia Square super-block and Cogswell Interchange, but even so, it is a far more attractive and interesting city than it was in the early 1970's. Let's give the city leaders credit for being progressively minded in its desire to tear down the Cogswell Interchange and restore the street grid, and for all the other great changes that the city has seen over the past 40 plus years. Cheers to Halifax, a great city that keeps becoming even better.

FWIW, I don't disagree with most of your points, but keep in mind that the city leaders thought they were being 'progressively minded' when the Cogswell Interchange and Scotia Square were conceived - and they were, in a 1950's/1960's mindset. Cities evolve, of course, and the future happens - we have no choice - but sometimes today's good ideas turn out to be tomorrow's bad ideas. The ferry terminal example you stated is a very good one - I remember those old terminals really well, and from a human standpoint they were much more welcoming and interesting than the 'industrial warehouse' style of the current ones, which I believe were built in the late 1970s. Perhaps if somebody at the time had the vision to restore and update them, or even build new, larger ones in the same style with similar materials at the human-interaction level, then today we'd be saying how much we like them...

Rather than regurgitate already-stated ideas, I'll just say that someone123's post up near the top of this page pretty much sums up how I feel about the situation, though he stated it much better and more completely than I ever could.

My post was more reactionary to the ideas expressed by some - that anybody who appreciates heritage buildings is 'resistant to change' or thinks that 'just because it's old it's good'. The point I was making is that Halifax's heritage buildings contain a value much greater than the simple collection of physical materials of which they are made - there is a history connected to each of them. There are construction methods used in building them that have not been practiced in many decades, there are peoples' lives and lineage associated with each and every one, not just the 'important' people, but also the everyday citizens who were the backbone and the life of this city over the past two-and-a-half centuries. What could be wrong with trying to preserve some of them in their original context? There are many empty lots and other more-appropriate spots to build new. Yet we continue to battle, and lose out to, those whose vision stops at the age of the structure, thinking that old is just old and therefore new must be better.

It's still surprising to me, given that most of the people I talk to in my travels tend to express the opinion that it's shameful to see century+ aged buildings torn down to build new glass and prefab-cladded structures. Yet it continues to happen, and nary a thought seems to be given to it by those who are in the position to do something about it.

That's all I was trying to say. :shrug:

IanWatson Jan 23, 2017 1:35 PM

Interestingly, old photos from the NS Archives (I think they've been posted earlier on this thread) showed that this building was once clad in brick. I always assumed that brick was still there underneath the siding.

However, the demo has shown that the only remaining brick was on the firewall on the south side of the building. The rest of the building was wooden shingles under the siding. Now I'm really curious to know when the brick was removed.

I'm torn on this one. I've always felt that 1363 Hollis, while unremarkable now after being neglected, was a good candidate for a restoration. And that while it was a small, fairly insignificant building on its own, it did contribute to the overall feel of this area of the city.

At the same time, I do really like the new building proposed, especially if they get the cladding right (and I generally trust Dexell to get it right). If we're going to be losing old buildings, it's at least some consolation to get new ones that are nice.

portapetey Jan 23, 2017 2:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IanWatson (Post 7686823)
Interestingly, old photos from the NS Archives (I think they've been posted earlier on this thread) showed that this building was once clad in brick. I always assumed that brick was still there underneath the siding.

It may be that it at one time had false-brick shingle, like another nearby building that was discussed in these threads.

In the demo photos, it appeared to have incredibly thin exterior walls overall. Maybe no more so than other old wooden buildings(?) - but seeing it so starkly was sort of fascinating to me.

ordinaryhand Jan 27, 2017 4:30 AM

hi all,

i used to live in this building as a student in the early '90s, and found this thread while randomly googling the address. i always remembered this apartment very fondly, and i was kind of gutted to see the picture of the flattened building. what a shame. amazing that it resisted developers all this time. i would have expected a company to renovate the flats into high-priced condo "lofts" as they tend to do here in montreal, which, while it is damaging to the rental market, seems a less tragic fate than flattening a heritage building and putting up a generic, cheaply made box.

my roommates and i lived on the third floor, which was the top -- the landlord at the time told us that at some point the building had a fourth floor which blew off in a storm? there was in fact a stairway leading up to nowhere in the kitchen. there was an antique stove and radiators and beautiful old decorative elements in the apartment and the public spaces. probably one of the nicest apartments i've ever lived in, in many ways.

i have lots of photos, which i'll have to dig up now, and i'll post any that might be of interest to the community here.

Drybrain Jan 27, 2017 2:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ordinaryhand (Post 7691837)
hi all,

i used to live in this building as a student in the early '90s, and found this thread while randomly googling the address. i always remembered this apartment very fondly, and i was kind of gutted to see the picture of the flattened building. what a shame. amazing that it resisted developers all this time. i would have expected a company to renovate the flats into high-priced condo "lofts" as they tend to do here in montreal, which, while it is damaging to the rental market, seems a less tragic fate than flattening a heritage building and putting up a generic, cheaply made box.

Restoring old buildings and turning them into upscale condos, complete with heritage cachet, is by far the most common means of developing properties like this across Canada. Except here. Many if not most of the big Halifax developers (Westwood, Dexel, et. al.) are entirely clueless about this kind of re-use. A lot of our developers locally don't know what the hell to do with any site that isn't a total clean late.

OldDartmouthMark Jan 27, 2017 3:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Drybrain (Post 7691992)
Restoring old buildings and turning them into upscale condos, complete with heritage cachet, is by far the most common means of developing properties like this across Canada. Except here. Many if not most of the big Halifax developers (Westwood, Dexel, et. al.) are entirely clueless about this kind of re-use. A lot of our developers locally don't know what the hell to do with any site that isn't a total clean late.

Correct, and there's no political will to protect properties like this or to create means by which to make it more attractive to developers to consider this option.

Keith P. Jan 27, 2017 4:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Drybrain (Post 7691992)
Restoring old buildings and turning them into upscale condos, complete with heritage cachet, is by far the most common means of developing properties like this across Canada. Except here. Many if not most of the big Halifax developers (Westwood, Dexel, et. al.) are entirely clueless about this kind of re-use. A lot of our developers locally don't know what the hell to do with any site that isn't a total clean late.

Indeed, I hear yuppies will pay big money for a 3rd-floor walk-up with beige vinyl siding and a stairway to nowhere.

Drybrain Jan 27, 2017 5:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Keith P. (Post 7692149)
Indeed, I hear yuppies will pay big money for a 3rd-floor walk-up with beige vinyl siding and a stairway to nowhere.

Replace the siding with something more attractive/historically accurate, and they will.

Jonovision Mar 31, 2017 10:11 PM

Sign boards have been put up on the fence around the site and it looks like a second entrance to the underground parking has been put in for the building next door.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2894/3...4a2230a0_h.jpg20170330_125305 by Jonovision23, on Flickr

hollistreet Aug 16, 2017 1:02 PM

This project gets underway as of August 22nd and will take 16 to 18 months to complete!

mleblanc Aug 16, 2017 1:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hollistreet (Post 7894471)
This project gets underway as of August 22nd and will take 16 to 18 months to complete!

Excited for this one! Can only imagine how Bishop St. is going to be while both the Alexander and this one are underway

Jonovision Aug 30, 2017 10:11 PM

Excavation has started.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4367/...4622f20d_h.jpg20170829_170914 by Jonovision23, on Flickr


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