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Cro Burnham May 24, 2016 7:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Baconboy007 (Post 7451646)
A better comparison for Faneuil Hall would be Reading Terminal Market than Independence Hall.

Great point. I imagine RTM numbers compare very well to Faneuil Hall.

Londonee May 24, 2016 8:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Knight Hospitaller (Post 7451650)
Maybe being next to Quincy Market generates the traffic? Independence Park and its environs is probably more of a deliberate choice to visit. People go there for the history and museums. People can just check out Faneuil Hall before or after lunch.

I'm pretty sure that number - because it's so high - incorporates the entire Fanueil Hall marketplace into the stats. So the hall, the north and south Marketplaces and Quincy Market.

It's kind of like counting Times Square b/c it's such an open complex/area.

summersm343 May 25, 2016 3:17 AM

Lancaster Mews redevelopment gets architectural committee support

http://planphilly.com/uploads/media_....752.360.c.png

Quote:

Lancaster Mews was designated historic in 2015 in response to a demolition threat. A developer was eyeing the block-sized lot, lined with late 19th century mixed-use buildings, and neighbors got wind that the plan was to demolish the intact row and replace it with a residential building geared at student renters. Though the designation frustrated the owner’s plans, Powelton Village neighbors and the owner have spent time over the last year negotiating to see if there is a mutually agreeable compromise to be struck, valuing preservation while enabling redevelopment.

On Tuesday, JKRP Architects presented updated plans for the project to the Philadelphia Historical Commission’s Architectural Committee. Rather than wholesale demolition or the thinnest facadectomy, the new plans propose keeping the taller corner buildings at 36th and 37th streets, retaining the facades and a portion of the buildings that front Lancaster Avenue. They propose demolition of the rearmost ells on the interior mid-block buildings and replacing these with new construction.

Earlier plans did not include ground-floor retail on the commercial corridor, which the neighborhood found especially objectionable. They argued that lower Lancaster Avenue is on the rise and it needs the strength from mixed-use buildings and vitality at the street generated by commercial uses as the area adds residents. The updated designs feature commercial spaces along Lancaster Avenue, with spaces to suit larger or smaller retailers. In exchange, the developers asked for an additional floor above the three-story buildings to accommodate more residential units.

The committee acquiesced to the rear demolitions requested, swayed in part because the mid-block location where historic fabric would be removed would be minimally visible from the public right of way. New construction and the existing buildings along Warren Street to the south would largely block that view. But the committee pushed back on the inclusion of a full new floor of residential units above the three-story facades fronting Lancaster Avenue.

In recommending approval of the designs, which will be voted on at the full commission soon, the committee asked that the massing of the overbuild on Lancaster Avenue half of the new upper floor be reduced to set back the addition more significantly. The committee also requested that the material on that portion of new construction be a red brick veneer so it blends more with the existing material.

Jonathan Broh, principal at JKRP, stressed that materials and many design details will likely change as the project moves through additional community conversations, zoning permitting, and Civic Design Review, but agreed to work with the commission staff as designs evolve.

Meanwhile the owner of Lancaster Mews has appealed the historic designation of the block. A hearing in the Court of Common Pleas has yet to be scheduled.
http://planphilly.com/articles/2016/...mittee-support

Londonee May 25, 2016 2:04 PM

Guys, they have a booth! In Vegas!

PREIT attacks!

I'm starting to hate the outlet concept more and more for center city...

1487 May 25, 2016 2:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Londonee (Post 7452669)
Guys, they have a booth! In Vegas!

PREIT attacks!

I'm starting to hate the outlet concept more and more for center city...

I do like what he was saying about the changes being made to the building though. It should be dramatically improved. I doubt I will do much shopping there regardless of what tenants they select so I really dont care if its an outlet concept or not. I just want to see a better facility that isn't cut off from the street.

DudeGuy May 25, 2016 2:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by summersm343 (Post 7452389)
Lancaster Mews redevelopment gets architectural committee support

http://planphilly.com/uploads/media_....752.360.c.png

I think this is great news, and hope it sets a precedent for future development along Lancaster Avenue. With all of the development happening near 30th street station and at the former high school site, there is so much potential for Lancaster to turn into a robust commercial corridor.

summersm343 May 25, 2016 3:51 PM

At Vegas event, PREIT chief pitching hard for Market East mall

Quote:

Since landing in Vegas on Saturday, he has been selling the Fashion Outlets of Philadelphia at Market East, the company's latest baby, at the nation's largest retail and real estate annual confab, known as ReCon, which will conclude Wednesday.

With the mall's targeted spring 2018 opening, Coradino and his team held no fewer than 150 meetings over three days to pitch Fashion Outlets.

Coradino said he wanted the parade of investors, brokers, and retail agents walking through PREIT's booth to see what the former Gallery at Market East would look like after its $500 million-plus makeover.

"We really put our Sunday best on for this," he said.

PREIT is in a joint venture with another real estate firm, Macerich, which is known for improving malls, to turn the Center City venue into what Coradino described as "a must go."

To sell the project, he had fancy 3-D video presentations showing the mall from all angles - facing Market Street with new lit-up signage up and down the corridor for a more inviting appearance, the restaurants that will line Filbert Street, and the food court that will face both the mall's interior and the commuter station for grab-and-go opportunities.

"I need it filled," said Coradino, who worked the room like a dervish, shaking hands, going in and out of meeting rooms, and seeking out those he hadn't seen in a while.

The renovation, he said, will fix a key design flaw of the mall where the stores were built in a "defensive mode," facing away from Market Street.

Instead, the project will open out to the street, inviting in shoppers and passersby.

Orkin said he had four or five national restaurant chains interested in opening in Center City and eyeing space at the mall.

"They are looking in the range of 6,000 to 9,000 square feet," Orkin, who talks regularly with PREIT about new restaurants for its Philly and South Jersey malls, said after watching the video. "They are looking because Center City is being recognized as having a very vibrant restaurant scene."

Coradino, ever the salesman, says he can't name names yet, but "a half-dozen retailers" have signed leases and he was "in negotiations with several more."

Just after 2 p.m. Tuesday, Coradino made his way into a small room with national representatives from Victoria's Secret.

Heather Crowell, PREIT's director of investor relations, cued up the Fashion Outlets video for them.

They watched attentively and "were receptive to the project," Coradino said after emerging from the room. "They're ready to talk to us about a deal."
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/busines...Ozcad0z1T64.99

br323206 May 25, 2016 3:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cro Burnham (Post 7451762)
Great point. I imagine RTM numbers compare very well to Faneuil Hall.

Nope, not even close. Faneuil sees more than twice the annual visitors of RTM. I don't know how Boston is able to market themselves so much better but they do. We should send our tourism folks up there to learn from them.

summersm343 May 25, 2016 4:06 PM

Neshaminy Creek opening brewery, tasting room by Fillmore in Fishtown

Quote:

Neshaminy Creek Brewing Co. is opening a brewery and tasting room on a stretch of Fishtown's Frankford Avenue that has recently experienced a renewal with the opening of The Fillmore.

The Bucks County-based brewery is moving in to a 5,655-square-foot space at 957-63 Frankford Ave., across the street from the relatively new music venue and a short distance from the Yards Brewing Co.'s location on Delaware Avenue.

Beer-lovers in Philadelphia are already familiar with Neshaminy Creek's brews, which can be found at bars and distributors throughout the city.

This will be the company's second location, according to its Facebook page. It's original location is in Croydon.

BillyPenn.com reports that plans include 24 taps serving the beermaker's brews.
http://www.bizjournals.com/philadelp...kford-ave.html

PHL10 May 25, 2016 5:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by br323206 (Post 7452845)
Nope, not even close. Faneuil sees more than twice the annual visitors of RTM. I don't know how Boston is able to market themselves so much better but they do. We should send our tourism folks up there to learn from them.

Wow, and in my experience, RTM is always fairly crowded.

I’m not suggesting anything but are the numbers self reported and what is the criteria for a visit to Faneuil Hall? Maybe it’s only entering the greater grounds that constitutes a visit as opposed to actually entering the building?

Cro Burnham May 25, 2016 5:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by br323206 (Post 7452845)
I don't know how Boston is able to market themselves so much better but they do.

Boston is just a more attractive city to mainstream people. Cleaner, safer, richer. And it has a lot more high-end international ties. I assume also its politicians are generally far smarter and more creative.

Philly carries alot of "baggage" relative to Boston that weighs down on its ability to create an appealing (or any) image for outsiders.

McBane May 25, 2016 5:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PHL10 (Post 7452960)
Wow, and in my experience, RTM is always fairly crowded.

I’m not suggesting anything but are the numbers self reported and what is the criteria for a visit to Faneuil Hall? Maybe it’s only entering the greater grounds that constitutes a visit as opposed to actually entering the building?

I agree there must be something about how the numbers are reported because RTM is so crowded all the time. And those numbers be damned anyway, RTM is way better tha......no, I don't want to go down that path!

But anyway, while there some advantages to being more populous, it's not the end all, be all. If Philadelphia can increase its density downtown and surrounding neighborhoods while "normalizing" (a much more accurate term for what others call "gentrification") hollowed out neighborhoods, we can get to 2,000,000 or so, which is right where Philadelphia should be. That's a long way out however.

1487 May 25, 2016 6:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cro Burnham (Post 7452977)
Boston is just a more attractive city to mainstream people. Cleaner, safer, richer. And it has a lot more high-end international ties. I assume also its politicians are generally far smarter and more creative.

Philly carries alot of "baggage" relative to Boston that weighs down on its ability to create an appealing (or any) image for outsiders.

who are mainstream people exactly? What does that mean?

3rd&Brown May 25, 2016 6:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1487 (Post 7453058)
who are mainstream people exactly? What does that mean?

They wear pleated khakis and square toe shoes. The women, a sensible chunky "heel".

It's sort of an apt observation. Philly isn't everyone's bag of tea, but I don't accept that as meaning "not as good as".

We all know we have our own vibe. It's what makes us great.

(The above is sarcasm, of course. But I think it's safe to say certain middle Americans feel more "safe" going some places than others. And suffice to say, Boston is probably at the top of their list. Right after Colonial Williamsburg.)

I'm not really interested in the idea of Philadelphia as a historic relic, anyway. I'm much more interested in promoting it as the relevant cultural capital it is, today.

summersm343 May 25, 2016 7:29 PM

Large Mixed-Use Building Coming to 49th & Spruce?

Proposed 9 story building:

http://www.ocfrealty.com/sites/www.o...PM-6389977.jpg

http://www.ocfrealty.com/naked-phill...to-49th-spruce

Cro Burnham May 25, 2016 7:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1487 (Post 7453058)
who are mainstream people exactly? What does that mean?

Travelers who like Boston better than Philadelphia, I guess. There seem to be more of them, which at least makes them more mainstream than the people who like Philly if you define "mainstream" in part as being related to the preferences and values of a plurality of people.

This can't be surprising to anyone: Boston is cute, genteel, and upscale. Philly by comparison is generally less cute, less genteel, and less upscale; tougher. I personally like Philadelphia better, in part for these reasons, but then my city preferences are not so mainstream.

In any event, it doesn't really matter. Whether mainstream or not, more people seem to like Boston than Philly. Not a shocking revelation.

hammersklavier May 25, 2016 8:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cro Burnham (Post 7452977)
Philly carries alot of "baggage" relative to Boston that weighs down on its ability to create an appealing (or any) image for outsiders.

But the same can be said of Chicago and that doesn't hamper their popularity any.

Londonee May 25, 2016 8:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PHL10 (Post 7452960)
Wow, and in my experience, RTM is always fairly crowded.

I’m not suggesting anything but are the numbers self reported and what is the criteria for a visit to Faneuil Hall? Maybe it’s only entering the greater grounds that constitutes a visit as opposed to actually entering the building?

See my note above. For the numbers to make sense it has to be the entire complex: north market, south market, quincy market and the hall. It's a large complex

Cro Burnham May 25, 2016 8:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hammersklavier (Post 7453184)
But the same can be said of Chicago and that doesn't hamper their popularity any.

I've been there many times, and I gotta say, Chicago has way more mainstream middle-American appeal than Philly as long as one avoids the rough parts of town. Even those have a kind of Midwestern blandness about them you won't find anywhere here.

I love Chicago. But I am always struck by the prevalence of Panera Breads, Chipotles, Jamba Juices, and endless other higher end fast food places dotting every commercial intersection from the Loop on up. Chains = mainstream. Same could be said for DC and many popular west coast towns. New York, particularly Manhattan, is increasingly generic and mainstream compared to, say, 20 years ago. All these places have a lot of generic upscale appeal that Philly just doesn't have, for whatever reason. Maybe one could say the same thing (even more so) about New Orleans. We live in a one-of-a-kind city. Many people, many national retailers, many big businesses don't get this city and simply refuse to try.

summersm343 May 25, 2016 10:43 PM

Checking in on the Public Safety Services Campus at 4601 Market

Quote:

It's been a minute since we last checked in on progress at the Public Safety Services Campus at 4601 Market. But a quick walk by the 15-acre property, formerly the Provident Mutual Life Building, revealed where construction stands as of this week.

Scaffolding has surrounded the clock bell tower for months now, and the windows have been boarded up.

The hulking limestone building is going to be part of the new Public Safety Services Campus, which will serve as the headquarters for the police, the medical examiner's office and morgue, and the Department of Health Laboratory Services.

The master plan was designed by Ballinger Architects and broke ground in 2014 and is expected to be ready in spring 2018. But renovations on the Provident Mutual Life Building should wrap up by the end of this year.
https://cdn1.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/jF9...063/image3.JPG

https://cdn1.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/6w9...28.32_PM.0.png

http://philly.curbed.com/2016/5/25/1...ervices-campus


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