PDA

View Full Version : Old Halifax


Pages : 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Keith P.
Mar 13, 2013, 10:16 PM
Not correct Keith, many Africville residents did own their own properties and paid taxes:

"7.
What City is received in return for taxes paid on Africville properties?
The 1960 tax roll contains 39 assessments for the Africville area. The total tax levied on these 39 properties amounted to $1,598.68. The total taxes owing on properties assessed in the Africville area as at August 29, 1962 amounts to $6,392.24. Tax arrears in the Africville area are, therefore, approximately four times the 1962 tax levy. The services provided by the City for the Africville area fall into two main categories. These are:
Welfare
Schools
Other services are provided on a much more limited basis."
http://www.library.dal.ca/ebooks/africville/ARR%20documents/Africville%20Relocation%20Report%20-%20Appendix%20D.pdf
Keith, since this is information from a City of Halifax official. I would hope that you would accept it, and not not perpetuate myths and revisionist versions of facts.
While parts of Africville may have been slum like, Halifax helped create and maintain it; charging taxes but not providing basic amenities like water and sewerage; pretty poor governance.

So they were charged taxes? They just didn't pay them.

JET
Mar 13, 2013, 11:10 PM
So they were charged taxes? They just didn't pay them.

To repeat, many did own property, and did pay taxes, even though they received very little in services from the City. As with everywhere, some didn't pay the property tax, and the properties were seized and sometimes sold. Nothing particular about Africville, still happens today.

ILoveHalifax
Mar 13, 2013, 11:14 PM
I believe there were other places on the peninsula which did not have sewer and water at the time. For sure there were large areas of Halifax County just off the peninsula on well and sewer. If you look at the pictures, these few houses were quite a distance from the built up parts of the city.

Hali87
Mar 13, 2013, 11:29 PM
So they were charged taxes? They just didn't pay them.

Source? Or is it just an assumption?

Keith P.
Mar 14, 2013, 10:47 AM
Source? Or is it just an assumption?

The quote states that tax arrears were 4 times as much as the tax levy.

JET
Mar 14, 2013, 12:44 PM
The quote states that tax arrears were 4 times as much as the tax levy.

That is correct and not surprising in impoverished areas.

Keith P.
Mar 14, 2013, 10:59 PM
So that means they were not paying taxes. My point stands.

Hali87
Mar 14, 2013, 11:02 PM
So that means they were not paying taxes. My point stands.

It means some of them weren't paying taxes, not that none of them were.

Drybrain
Mar 15, 2013, 1:59 AM
And we're talking about a community entirely comprised of a marginalized racial group (certainly at that time, at least) who had been there for about 150 years. Taxes are not the trump card in this situation. Taxation or not (and as has been said above, some properties did pay taxes to the city) the evictions were top-down civic macro-management, inspired less by a concern for the welfare of the people than by the value of the land for industry.

The eviction, and the way it was carried out, were wrong. No amount of sophistry about taxes will change that.

Keith P.
Mar 15, 2013, 10:33 AM
Taxation or not (and as has been said above, some properties did pay taxes to the city) the evictions were top-down civic macro-management, inspired less by a concern for the welfare of the people than by the value of the land for industry.

Yes, merely build a brand-new community for them nearby with the latest amenities of the time and give it to them for free. How horrible.

JET
Mar 15, 2013, 12:13 PM
Yes, merely build a brand-new community for them nearby with the latest amenities of the time and give it to them for free. How horrible.

I met a man recently who moved to uniacke square when it first opened. At the time it was probably a 'free' situation'. He probably went to post secondary school around the time that Keith and I did. I figure that he pays in taxes now, local and federal, more than Keith and I together.
It is horrible that people have tremendous difficulty getting out of poverty, either way is not an easy road.

ILoveHalifax
Mar 15, 2013, 8:06 PM
I met a man recently who moved to uniacke square when it first opened. At the time it was probably a 'free' situation'. He probably went to post secondary school around the time that Keith and I did. I figure that he pays in taxes now, local and federal, more than Keith and I together.
It is horrible that people have tremendous difficulty getting out of poverty, either way is not an easy road.

So if he is paying lots of taxes he must be making lots of money or have property of great value.

Hali87
Mar 15, 2013, 10:13 PM
To think that all it took was for an American formurer to innocently thank somebody for posting a picture of Africville, where his family lived. Result: this shitstorm.

Spoiler alert: nobody's going to change their minds. To some people, allocation of tax resources trumps social responsibility, to others, vice versa. Why have this argument again and again and again?

W.Sobchak
Mar 15, 2013, 11:53 PM
Question, does anybody have a pic of the corner of quinpool and robie before the holiday inn/atlantica was built?

I cannot seem to find one online.

ILoveHalifax
Mar 16, 2013, 12:43 AM
Question, does anybody have a pic of the corner of quinpool and robie before the holiday inn/atlantica was built?

I cannot seem to find one online.

I don't have a picture but Reg Ryer had a service station on that corner for years. It was Esso, I believe

W.Sobchak
Mar 16, 2013, 2:47 AM
Thank ILH, now I have an idea of what to search for.

W.Sobchak
Mar 24, 2013, 4:07 PM
So in my trek through the wilds of the Internet jungle, I fell upon a website with the 1945 master plan for Halifax. I have to say that the city back then seemed to have a better idea with what the peninsula shoul grow into.

http://cargocollective.com/cause/1945-Master-Plan-for-the-City-of-Halifax

ILoveHalifax
Mar 24, 2013, 5:21 PM
So in my trek through the wilds of the Internet jungle, I fell upon a website with the 1945 master plan for Halifax. I have to say that the city back then seemed to have a better idea with what the peninsula shoul grow into.

http://cargocollective.com/cause/1945-Master-Plan-for-the-City-of-Halifax

How interesting, I've been reading for a couple of hours. They talk a lot about our slums or blighted areas and discuss the standards in these areas.
It is amazing how there were plans way back then to grow the city and how some were completed and some never went any further. No Arm bridge but 2 harbor bridges.

Keith P.
Mar 24, 2013, 6:43 PM
So in my trek through the wilds of the Internet jungle, I fell upon a website with the 1945 master plan for Halifax. I have to say that the city back then seemed to have a better idea with what the peninsula shoul grow into.

http://cargocollective.com/cause/1945-Master-Plan-for-the-City-of-Halifax

Fascinating reading. The city authorities apparently were more far-sighted then than are ours today, considering this was done when Halifax was consumed with the war effort and the future was somewhat uncertain. Perhaps that allowed a degree of freedom to their deliberations that is not found today, where political correctness and the need to satisfy various special interests seems to slant their actions.

It is interesting that most of the recommendations seem quite sound. It is also interesting to note that, as is typical of Halifax, virtually none of them were implemented. The closest seems to have been the construction of the SGR memorial library, although even that was cheapened up considerably by deleting the recommended 2000-seat auditorium that would have served as an arts facility.

I found their comments on the street grid riveting. They identified then what I constantly rant about today - the antique and obsolete road network. They identified a great many solutions that are quite sensible, from the NW Arm bridge with supporting street improvements, a complete redevelopment of the ridiculously undersized North St-to-Chebucto Rd corridor for the then-proposed MacDonald Bridge, numerous logical fixes to existing street issues of the day, and a series of diagonal arteries from the waterfront area uphill to the center of the city to alleviate the steep grades. All of these ideas on the road network were brilliant, all would still be trememdously useful today, and I do not think a single one of them was ever implemented. Shameful.

Highly recommended reading.

fenwick16
Mar 25, 2013, 1:21 AM
So in my trek through the wilds of the Internet jungle, I fell upon a website with the 1945 master plan for Halifax. I have to say that the city back then seemed to have a better idea with what the peninsula shoul grow into.

http://cargocollective.com/cause/1945-Master-Plan-for-the-City-of-Halifax

Very interesting. The simple sketch of the Northwest Arm bridge shows that a bridge was being considered almost 70 years ago. I don't think that a suspension bridge would be required though. Here is the sketch.

(source: http://issuu.com/brendancormier/docs/master_plan_for_the_city_of_halifax_1945/80 )
http://imageshack.us/a/img853/9541/northwestarmbridge.jpg

Aya_Akai
Mar 25, 2013, 1:56 AM
Very interesting. The simple sketch of the Northwest Arm bridge shows that a bridge was being considered almost 70 years ago. I don't think that a suspension bridge would be required though. Here is the sketch.

(source: http://issuu.com/brendancormier/docs/master_plan_for_the_city_of_halifax_1945/80 )
http://imageshack.us/a/img853/9541/northwestarmbridge.jpg

I like how the rail cut goes below ground in that image, that "aquatic gardens" park at the rotary with the pinnacle/monument thing is pretty friggin cool too.

someone123
Mar 25, 2013, 5:20 AM
It's too bad they didn't build that bridge back in the 1940's. It would still be a useful project today, but the newer subdivisions make it harder to create a reasonable road network.

terrynorthend
Mar 26, 2013, 11:43 AM
I like how the rail cut goes below ground in that image, that "aquatic gardens" park at the rotary with the pinnacle/monument thing is pretty friggin cool too.

"Memorial Shaft." That is all.:tup:

someone123
Apr 10, 2013, 5:20 AM
Here's a rare photo of Sackville Street during the 1950's. You can see the Zeller's where the Discovery Centre is today. Even more interesting are the brick buildings on Sackville below Hollis Street. I've never been able to find closer street-level shots of them:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/901533_10152649570440109_252595635_o.jpg
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152649570440109

This one's not very clear but it's an amazing little scene:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/537924_514997151883803_1102211918_n.jpg

This one's great too:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/21678_519996561383862_1113542359_n.jpg

Albums are here (there are over 7,000 photos in total): https://www.facebook.com/VintageHalifax/photos_stream

Hali87
Apr 10, 2013, 10:12 AM
WOW. Those people do not look happy.

It's interesting how much busier Halifax looked back then, almost to the point of being legitimately crowded. But yeah, not necessarily carefree.

Drybrain
Apr 10, 2013, 12:53 PM
Oh, brutal. Seeing the Customs House is always a punch to the gut, and I never knew the Tex-Park site had so much stuff on it. There certainly seems to have been a grandness to the city back then that's only partially surviving today.

I saw recently some old aerials of the St. Lawrence neighbourhood in Toronto--19th century, 1970s, and present day. The density of the built environment in the first was incredible, but more than half the buildings were gone by the 70s. Today those holes have mostly been filled in again by newer development. Hopefully our way forward as well.

OldDartmouthMark
Apr 10, 2013, 3:23 PM
Cool! Thanks for posting those!

Regarding the mood of the people, it could be something as simple as they were not happy to have their photo taken by a stranger. Cameras (and phones with cameras) were not as common on the street back then, and I think people generally tended to be a little more shy, humble and conservative compared to today. I don't think people were generally unhappy then, in fact I get the impression that the opposite was true.

I can't say first-hand, though as I wasn't around in the fifties... :)

Drybrain
Apr 10, 2013, 6:17 PM
Much as I lament the loss of a lot of those buildings, is that a huge oil tank on the waterfront in the Sackville shot? Certainly better off without that.

OldDartmouthMark
Apr 10, 2013, 6:31 PM
Did you see the "then and now" pic that somebody posted on that page? Pretty neat!

https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc1/882488_540072782709573_1522192106_o.jpg

Aya_Akai
Apr 13, 2013, 5:22 AM
I just came across this old Imperial Oil ad from 1970, talking about the Woodside refinery. It's a pretty mediocre commercial, but ends with a cool pan-in shot of downtown from the refinery itself.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDADu0TkwE8

fenwick16
Apr 13, 2013, 7:03 AM
I just came across this old Imperial Oil ad from 1970, talking about the Woodside refinery. It's a pretty mediocre commercial, but ends with a cool pan-in shot of downtown from the refinery itself.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDADu0TkwE8

Very interesting. It looks like the CIBC tower, TD tower and Cogswell tower are all missing (they weren't yet built back in 1970).

Keith P.
Apr 13, 2013, 4:41 PM
Hey, here's another one! From 1973:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpXinsoCIPk

Aya_Akai
Apr 15, 2013, 5:22 AM
Hey, here's another one! From 1973:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpXinsoCIPk

Nice one Keith. These videos are a little glimpse back in my family history. A good chunk of my mothers side of the family resided in Woodside for, well, longer than the refinery existed.. lol. My great uncle's house was right across Pleasant St. between what is now the little mini-mart and the Imperial truck filling facility. The house is gone now he's been gone for many years, and the land was sold to Imperial, but the little gravel lot where it once stood is an important little bit of history for us, and getting to see what the immediate area of the refinery looked like, and the views from the area is really cool. :tup:

someone123
May 6, 2013, 1:48 AM
Here's something a little different -- rendering of the Keith and Gordon Building, a.k.a. Green Lantern Building, from 1896. I think this is one of the nicer old commercial blocks on the street.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/935040_555465564503628_1118182543_n.jpg
https://www.facebook.com/VintageHalifax/photos_stream

It was a little depressing to google the building and find an article in the Coast from 2009 about its impending restoration.

Duff
May 7, 2013, 7:32 PM
Jean Laroche just reported on Twitter that the Dennis building is now closed to its workers after they discovered high mold levels.

https://twitter.com/larochecbc/status/331849099206856704

Drybrain
May 7, 2013, 9:42 PM
Jean Laroche just reported on Twitter that the Dennis building is now closed to its workers after they discovered high mold levels.

https://twitter.com/larochecbc/status/331849099206856704

Transportation and Infrastructure minister said "I guess at some stage a 171 year (old building) is gonna have to have to come down." That flies in the face of this report (https://www.halifax.ca/capitaldistrict/documents/GPPHfinalReportDecember2006.pdf) from 2006, indicating a rehab as the cheapest of five options for site reuse, including demolition and a new building.

In any case, some NDP party folks I know say the first step will be to attempt a remediation. Still makes me nervous, though. The thing is clearly in need of an exterior power-wash and thorough interior scrubdown, but if a report from 2006 indicated that a reno was cheaper than a demo, I have a hard time seeing how anyone can make a convincing case for the latter. BUt since few people will bother to compare the numbers and weigh all the options, they won't need to make a convincing case. All it'll take is a few people saying, "Well, guess its time has come," and everyone will nod sadly.

Keith P.
May 7, 2013, 10:55 PM
Transportation and Infrastructure minister said "I guess at some stage a 171 year (old building) is gonna have to have to come down." That flies in the face of this report (https://www.halifax.ca/capitaldistrict/documents/GPPHfinalReportDecember2006.pdf) from 2006, indicating a rehab as the cheapest of five options for site reuse, including demolition and a new building.

In any case, some NDP party folks I know say the first step will be to attempt a remediation. Still makes me nervous, though. The thing is clearly in need of an exterior power-wash and thorough interior scrubdown, but if a report from 2006 indicated that a reno was cheaper than a demo, I have a hard time seeing how anyone can make a convincing case for the latter. BUt since few people will bother to compare the numbers and weigh all the options, they won't need to make a convincing case. All it'll take is a few people saying, "Well, guess its time has come," and everyone will nod sadly.

Nobody who has ever had to spend work time there would miss it one little bit. It is a terrible building from a functional point of view. I don't know how it could be renovated to current standards given the ceiling heights, lack of elevator shafts, etc.

The report identified the issues with mold and other problems relating to occupancy back in 2006. However it seems to be biased toward the entire heritage value, referencing a report by Elizabeth Pacey, of all people, and referring to the usual obstructionist voices during one of the interminable consultations: "Given the clear preference of the public to maintain the Dennis Building, if removal of the building is seriously contemplated, there must be a compelling and clearly articulated reason for so doing. As stated by one participant in the consultative process, “it needs a big argument, not a series of small arguments” to justify demolition or significant alteration."

Really? Says who? If it were to be knocked down and a mirror image of One Government Place were to be built on the site and adjacent parking lot I would not shed a tear.

ILoveHalifax
May 7, 2013, 11:09 PM
Yipee!

Let's take a few pics, then tear it down and build a new structure that uses the whole lot. The vacant lot does nothing for Barrington. From what I was reading they really could only half ass preserve a facade. We have streets of old facades. Let's build something that looks like 2013.

Drybrain
May 7, 2013, 11:11 PM
Nobody who has ever had to spend work time there would miss it one little bit. It is a terrible building from a functional point of view. I don't know how it could be renovated to current standards given the ceiling heights, lack of elevator shafts, etc.

Oh, no the ceilings are too low! Guess it's useless then! (Sarcasm.)

It can be gutted and rebuilt inside in a contemporary fashion—which, as I have tried to point out exhaustively on here, is called "adaptive reuse", and has been done many, many, many times, around the world, successfully. Whether you think it's worth the effort on a small building is one thing, but this is one of the grandest, largest, most visible old structures in the city/province/Maritimes. Tearing down should not even be on the table. It would be an act of civic vandalism on par with removing Keith Hall or something like that.

Drybrain
May 7, 2013, 11:15 PM
Yipee!

Let's take a few pics, then tear it down and build a new structure that uses the whole lot. The vacant lot does nothing for Barrington. From what I was reading they really could only half ass preserve a facade. We have streets of old facades. Let's build something that looks like 2013.

Whatever you were reading is wrong. There's more than enough room on the Barrington-facing side to build there without removing the Dennis.

I genuinely don't understand you and Keith. Advocating for tearing this down is bizarre. Whatever.

ILoveHalifax
May 7, 2013, 11:16 PM
10 years ago when I moved to Halifax, friends dragged me to Parade Square to see the New Year's fireworks. I nearly froze to death. However, I was very impressed with the display as it was reflecting in the glass of the TD building.
So I vote for another glass mirror highrise. Come to think of it what a great place for residential with a view over the Square. Granville side office and Barrington side residential. How high can we go?

ILoveHalifax
May 7, 2013, 11:22 PM
Oh, no the ceilings are too low! Guess it's useless then! (Sarcasm.)

It can be gutted and rebuilt inside in a contemporary fashion—which, as I have tried to point out exhaustively on here, is called "adaptive reuse", and has been done many, many, many times, around the world, successfully. Whether you think it's worth the effort on a small building is one thing, but this is one of the grandest, largest, most visible old structures in the city/province/Maritimes. Tearing down should not even be on the table. It would be an act of civic vandalism on par with removing Keith Hall or something like that.

What I read is if they were to try to save it (the facade0 they would have to add a few feet per floor to get proper ceiling height and that would most likely destroy the appearance of the building.

Drybrain
May 7, 2013, 11:31 PM
What I read is if they were to try to save it (the facade0 they would have to add a few feet per floor to get proper ceiling height and that would most likely destroy the appearance of the building.

There is no "proper" ceiling height, just preferred. I encourage you to take a walk through NYC sometime and marvel at the streets full of buildings with obsolete ceiling heights. As to how high can be built here, 28 metres under HRMbD.

Here's what I don't understand: Rather than try and preserve what is clearly one of the very best buildings of its era in the city, the province, and in fact the country, people just immediately go, "well, it's old and there are certain challenges with reusing it. So rather than try and solve those problems, knock 'er down."

We need to exercise more imagination with building out city. There are lots of other places to put new glass towers.

ILoveHalifax
May 7, 2013, 11:54 PM
There are lots of other places to put new glass towers.

I don't think so! Every site with every old slum seems somebody wants to save it.

Keith P.
May 8, 2013, 12:21 AM
BTW, that report from 2006 gave estimates for 5 options regarding the Dennis. The cheapest was demolition and new construction. Just to be accurate and all.

Drybrain
May 8, 2013, 12:45 AM
BTW, that report from 2006 gave estimates for 5 options regarding the Dennis. The cheapest was demolition and new construction. Just to be accurate and all.

I think you misread: Under "total cost" it said the cheapest were options 1 and 4--preserve with minimal changes to the structure, or preserve and remove every other floor to create higher (I guess way higher) ceilings.

Low ceiling heights make it untenable as Class A office space. No problem: make it residential or Class B. So many choices.

someone123
May 8, 2013, 2:30 AM
The biggest challenge when it comes to running a government or running a city like Halifax is that you have to balance the disparate needs and desires of many different groups. Some people don't care about heritage buildings, but they are inherently valuable to others, so a balanced solution is for the government to put some amount of effort into saving them. The province can't afford to spend tons of money, but a creative solution might not cost much at all, and it could be a big win when you consider how unique the Dennis Building is. It's not true that Halifax has tons of buildings like this -- it really only has a few blocks of nice stone buildings centred around Province House. This area should be considered a very special heritage district. There is nothing else quite like it anywhere else in Canada.

The ceiling height issue seems like it would be less of a problem if the building were converted to residential, or maybe it could just become some sort of lower cost incubator space for new businesses downtown. There are lots of empty sites nearby for the province to build on, like the surrounding parking lot, the empty lot by the AGNS, the Queen's Landing lot, etc., and there is vacant space in some existing office buildings downtown.

Keith P.
May 8, 2013, 11:31 AM
I think you misread: Under "total cost" it said the cheapest were options 1 and 4--preserve with minimal changes to the structure, or preserve and remove every other floor to create higher (I guess way higher) ceilings.

Last page of the report summarizes the options. Cheapest per sq ft is demo & build new. They buried that nicely.

Low ceiling heights make it untenable as Class A office space. No problem: make it residential or Class B. So many choices.

Brilliant. Let's turn it into MLA apartments to appease the public who seem to want out-of-town MLAs to sleep in the back seat of their cars in the Province House parking lot rather than pay them a housing allowance. I can see it now: a penthouse on top for the Premier; the top floors for govt members; the middle floors for the official opposition; ground floors for the other parties. Perhaps they can construct a gaol in the basement for those MLAs who are convicted of expense fraud or other misdeeds. We would need to construct underground parking below the gaol to allow cars to be removed from Province House, but that should only be a few dozen million, unless they find historic artifacts, in which case the cost could cause the province to go bankrupt in the name of some 18th century broken bottles.

This is a fine adaptive reuse of an otherwise unusable heritage building and will have a payback of 200 years or so, which seems appropriate.

Antigonish
May 12, 2013, 7:15 PM
Check out this video from 1989. Driving tour through downtown from Gottingen all the way to Spring Garden Road. Lots of changes since then!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQ4hUuArFbs

Aya_Akai
May 13, 2013, 12:46 AM
Check out this video from 1989. Driving tour through downtown from Gottingen all the way to Spring Garden Road. Lots of changes since then!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQ4hUuArFbs

Lot's of changes for sure, however, there are lots of spots where other than the models of the cars driving around, everything is still pretty much the same.. and several of those are places where things should've progressed at least SOME in 25 years.. lol:shrug:

Drybrain
May 13, 2013, 1:48 AM
Was hoping to see the pre-fire NFB site, and the buildings on Barrington across from the Grand Parade that were demolished in 89, but the guy behind the camera pans away from them.

Music is amusingly bizarre though, especially with all the fast zooms into the harbour at the beginning.

someone123
May 13, 2013, 2:56 AM
Was hoping to see the pre-fire NFB site, and the buildings on Barrington across from the Grand Parade that were demolished in 89, but the guy behind the camera pans away from them.

It is frustrating -- like they were trying to avoid showing all the stuff that would be interesting in retrospect. One interesting corner they did show is Spring Garden and Queen (this video was posted here a while ago and some bigger pictures of the white corner Radio Shack building were posted back then).

It's actually pretty hard to find pictures of many sections of the downtown, particularly from the 1940-2000 period. 90% of the photos are of the same old landmarks that are mostly still there today.

someone123
May 22, 2013, 3:09 AM
Rare shot of Hollis Street from the 50's. I actually like the Bank of Canada building. I think there's a good chance that in 20 years people will look back and miss some modern buildings in the same way people today lament the loss of pre-war buildings.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/469022_562463767137141_1171551652_o.jpg
https://www.facebook.com/VintageHalifax

eastcoastal
May 22, 2013, 10:47 AM
Rare shot of Hollis Street from the 50's. I actually like the Bank of Canada building. I think there's a good chance that in 20 years people will look back and miss some modern buildings in the same way people today lament the loss of pre-war buildings.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/469022_562463767137141_1171551652_o.jpg
https://www.facebook.com/VintageHalifax

The Bank of Canada building is one of my low-key favourites in town.

Keith P.
May 23, 2013, 2:02 AM
There is a block that has not changed in nearly 60 years.

Aya_Akai
May 23, 2013, 2:52 AM
There is a block that has not changed in nearly 60 years.

...Except for the big stupid fence they put up in the middle of the sidewalk, and the big metal ties, to prevent chunks of the cladding of the Ralston Building from falling off the building and killing someone :shrug::uhh:

someone123
Jun 1, 2013, 10:00 PM
1991. You can see the Summer Gardens condo tower under construction. There were very few buildings below Barrington Street. At one point there were some brick buildings along Hollis on the same block as the Maritime Centre, but they are gone in this photo:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-i7cfySj2bpM/UadM92atbuI/AAAAAAAAOTY/FVjG0utnTRY/s1600/9107-10,+Aivik,+1991-02-23.jpg
http://shipfax.blogspot.ca/

HalifaxRetales
Jun 19, 2013, 11:48 AM
Some post WWII Halifax pics on my blog http://halifax.retales.ca/halifax-after-the-second-great-war/

and these of the building of the Fairview Overpass in the late 50s

http://halifax.retales.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/fairview-overpass-1957-1959.jpg
http://halifax.retales.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/fairview-overpass-1957-19591.jpg

JET
Jul 10, 2013, 7:19 PM
http://www.flickr.com/groups/1997529@N23/pool/

some nice old shots of Dartmouth; I particularly like the inkwell building and the stone house on North Street.

fenwick16
Jul 10, 2013, 9:59 PM
http://www.flickr.com/groups/1997529@N23/pool/

some nice old shots of Dartmouth; I particularly like the inkwell building and the stone house on North Street.

I like the picture of the old baseball park where the Dartmouth Holiday Inn is now located (next to the MacDonald Bridge). Based on the description it would have been torn down in the 1960's. It appears as though it would have sat 3000 to 3500 spectators - http://www.flickr.com/photos/rdb466/8273936516/in/pool-1997529@N23/

resetcbu1
Jul 11, 2013, 12:56 AM
I like the picture of the old baseball park where the Dartmouth Holiday Inn is now located (next to the MacDonald Bridge). Based on the description it would have been torn down in the 1960's. It appears as though it would have sat 3000 to 3500 spectators - http://www.flickr.com/photos/rdb466/8273936516/in/pool-1997529@N23/

Wow, that's quite impressive looking (for it's time)ball park and it looks like it was a football stadium as well...... That's quite a shame as I think the holiday inn and office building could have been better suited downtown Dartmouth.. And over the years that stadium could have been extensively renovated and we wouldn't be in such dire needs for a new stadium at this point...location was amazing to boot.

OldDartmouthMark
Jul 11, 2013, 1:32 PM
Wow, that's quite impressive looking (for it's time)ball park and it looks like it was a football stadium as well...... That's quite a shame as I think the holiday inn and office building could have been better suited downtown Dartmouth.. And over the years that stadium could have been extensively renovated and we wouldn't be in such dire needs for a new stadium at this point...location was amazing to boot.

That ball park was nicknamed "Little Brooklyn" and was the home of the Dartmouth Arrows baseball team, part of the Halifax and District League, I believe. Minor league baseball was a big deal in the area back in the '40s and '50s with some local players even making it to the major leagues.

I don't know why the park was razed to make way for the Holiday Inn, but this is motivating me to do a little research on the topic. :cheers:

EDIT: Did a little searching on the net and found this history lesson on the Halifax and District Baseball League. Really interesting if you're a baseball fan, or just a student of local history. The story doesn't spell it out, but I'm guessing that the field was taken down as a result of the demise of the league, after 1959.

Here's the link:
http://www.museevirtuel-virtualmuseum.ca/sgc-cms/histoires_de_chez_nous-community_memories/pm_v2.php?id=story_line&lg=English&fl=0&ex=00000562&sl=4440&pos=1

JET
Jul 11, 2013, 4:23 PM
also impressive is the view of the harbour from Brightwood golf course, too bad it's not public land.

someone123
Sep 8, 2013, 8:07 PM
A bunch of new photos have gone up on the Vintage Halifax page on Facebook.

This is Sackville and Hollis. I think it was torn down in the 80's -- too bad:
https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/602864_616125968437587_388907351_n.jpg

King Edward Hotel, built by the North End train station and destroyed in the explosion:
https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/1186277_616123581771159_1271335424_n.jpg

Moirs factory on Argyle Street:
https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/8562_613729272010590_639229239_n.jpg

Sugar refinery, possibly Northwest Arm? There were a couple in the city circa 1900:
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/547721_613040455412805_1627904122_n.jpg

Old city market and police offices circa 1960s. Seems a lot more interesting than the boring apartment building that replaced it, and less aggressively ugly than the 1980's-era police HQ:
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/1240557_612091292174388_954989247_n.jpg

Drybrain
Sep 8, 2013, 9:36 PM
Losing the King Edward doens't bother me because, you know, act of god or whatever. Too bad, but no one to blame, exactly.

But I've always kind've wondered with the Sackville and Hollis area used to look like, so THAT is a mighty shame.

someone123
Sep 8, 2013, 9:52 PM
But I've always kind've wondered with the Sackville and Hollis area used to look like, so THAT is a mighty shame.

The whole stretch of Hollis from about Buckingham/Duke down to Salter or Bishop was masonry buildings, mostly around 4-6 storeys. The Halifax Club for example was originally one of a row of ornate sandstone office buildings, and the Royal Bank building used to be a Victorian sandstone office as well. The blocks below Hollis toward the waterfront had a decent number of good quality buildings, like the long-gone 1830's-era granite Cunard building that I have only seen in sketches (Liverpool still has its Cunard HQ building -- http://www.rbiassets.com/GetImage.ashx/89911993212/image.jpg). The buildings were probably in rough shape by the 70's, but this would have been no different from old Montreal or Quebec's old town and if these blocks had been preserved they would have been great assets.

It's too bad Halifax's central office district didn't shift a little more than it did. The area below Barrington Street would have made a great heritage district had it been preserved in its ~1950's state, and the office towers might have worked a little better farther North. Most of the top-quality stuff like Province House, the Bank of NS, Granville, Barrington, etc. has survived, but I still think what happened was a pretty big disaster, and that people in Halifax don't really appreciate their city's history (see: Dennis Building, right next to Province House). I blame this a bit on neglect at a national level, and the fact that most of the history in the Maritimes (in particularly anything not fitting in with the rural fisher-folk image) tends to get ignored, and as a result people in Halifax and visitors/potential visitors never really appreciated what was there. Even some of Halifax's biggest attractions like Pier 21 tend to be oriented toward the rest of the country, while the city's archival materials are out in a warehouse in Burnside.

Drybrain
Sep 8, 2013, 10:36 PM
It IS too bad the financial district didn't shift somewhat--similar to the enormous number of old structures around King/Queen and Bay in Toronto that were knocked down for various 60s-era skyscrapers, or buildings in the St. Lawrence area lost for parking lots.

Halifax has enough old stuff to keep its reputation as a historic city (I know lots of people who visit and rave about the old buildings, not even realizing how much more substantive it used to be). But it's really been no better at preserving its past than any Canadian city, and I think the "knock down these rotting old things and make way for new investment" types should consider just how extensively that philosophy has already been attempted, and how badly it's failed. And consider the case of a city like Portland, ME: nearly identical in size, geography, architecture and history, but with a much more intact--and much livelier--downtown. (Though American cities tend to be a bit grander than their Canadian counterparts.)

someone123
Sep 10, 2013, 4:15 AM
I have never been to Portland ME but it is striking how different it looks from Halifax despite how close it is. I think it's a bit more like a twin of Saint John, and its economic trajectory has been almost the opposite of Halifax (part of that makes perfect sense, since the two cities were somewhat at odds as ports). The golden ages in Halifax were the war years, 1850's to 1870's, and the post-war period. Portland would have been a step down in 1860, but a step ahead in 1920. Halifax seems to have seen far more post-war development, but most of that was awful. The quality of new stuff is changing pretty quickly though, and eventually I think the city's relative openness to modern architecture (compared to the rest of Atlantic Canada and New England, which isn't saying much really) might become an asset.

Halifax has enough old stuff to keep its reputation as a historic city (I know lots of people who visit and rave about the old buildings, not even realizing how much more substantive it used to be). But it's really been no better at preserving its past than any Canadian city

Halifax can be a pretty schizophrenic town. It's arguably both old and new as far as North American cities go, and it has a lot of historical baggage and notoriety within Canada. Maybe that's why there are so many weird debates and stereotypes that are so disconnected from the modern reality on the ground.

Drybrain
Sep 10, 2013, 1:41 PM
I have never been to Portland ME but it is striking how different it looks from Halifax despite how close it is. I think it's a bit more like a twin of Saint John, and its economic trajectory has been almost the opposite of Halifax (part of that makes perfect sense, since the two cities were somewhat at odds as ports). The golden ages in Halifax were the war years, 1850's to 1870's, and the post-war period. Portland would have been a step down in 1860, but a step ahead in 1920. Halifax seems to have seen far more post-war development, but most of that was awful. The quality of new stuff is changing pretty quickly though, and eventually I think the city's relative openness to modern architecture (compared to the rest of Atlantic Canada and New England, which isn't saying much really) might become an asset.


Ah, yes. I don't know much of the historical or economic particulars. It certainly has more of the brick-and-stone vibe of Saint John, but I feel almost as if that's basically just like a better-preserved Halifax in some ways, with a more robust downtown. It essentially has two grand Victorian main streets, Commercial Street and Congress Street, separated by several blocks of less impressive but still quite nice old buildings. (Of course there are still chunks of unfortunate redevelopment or parking lots, but less frequently than in Halifax.)

I'd be curious to know more about the history, but my sense is just that American cities generally feel more robust than analogous Canadian ones.

Portland's east end seemed especially Halifax-y to me:A smaller version of the North End, full of similar Victorian wood-framed houses.

One advantage Halifax has is a more impressive natural features (Citadel, more parks) and what felt like a better-developed waterfront, commercially. And better universities. And Halifax is starting to generate better contemporary architecture. I can't recall seeing much decent new stuff in Portland.

Antigonish
Sep 10, 2013, 1:52 PM
I've been to Portland ME a few times. It has terrible sprawl outside of downtown. The downtown is decently preserved, but mainly because the city hasn't grown much in a number of decades.

And yes it looks VERY similar to Uptown Saint John. Much more comparable.

Drybrain
Sep 10, 2013, 2:13 PM
I've been to Portland ME a few times. It has terrible sprawl outside of downtown.

What city doesn't? Anyway, I'm not really interested in why it might have been better preserved (lack of growth) only the result today (better downtown. And notably, the population decline has stopped, and the city is growing again, and all those old buildings are full of businesses and people).

someone123
Sep 14, 2013, 2:50 AM
I'd be curious to know more about the history, but my sense is just that American cities generally feel more robust than analogous Canadian ones.

I find that it's all over the map. One trend I have noticed is that the nicest areas in the US tend to be really nice (but very conservative and generally low-density), while the worst areas are terrible slums. These differences tend to be flattened out in Canadian cities, so the nicest parts come off looking shabby.

One weird thing about Canada is that many cities here seem to be pretty laissez-faire about planning. HRM is changing a bit but up until very recently they did almost nothing deliberate to invest in the core. Meanwhile, in the US, many cities have been falling over themselves to build entertainment districts or even subsidize retailers. There's a happy medium between these two extremes, and it consists of investing carefully in practical, truly public infrastructure like transit and streetscaping.

Drybrain
Sep 14, 2013, 4:42 PM
I find that it's all over the map. One trend I have noticed is that the nicest areas in the US tend to be really nice (but very conservative and generally low-density), while the worst areas are terrible slums. These differences tend to be flattened out in Canadian cities, so the nicest parts come off looking shabby.



In rural areas too--I took a road-trip from Moncton down to New England this summer, and immediately after we crossed the border at Calais, into Aroostook County, Maine, everything felt a lot grimmer. Rural New Brunswick is ostensibly among the poorest parts of Canada, but it feels pretty cheerful and pleasant regardless. As soon as we entered Maine, it was dodgy as all hell. Crumbling old mansions with no electrical hookups, Dust Bowl-looking folks at the side of the road--really disconcerting. Granted, we took some weird back roads, but still.

ILoveHalifax
Sep 14, 2013, 4:46 PM
I find that it's all over the map. One trend I have noticed is that the nicest areas in the US tend to be really nice (but very conservative and generally low-density), while the worst areas are terrible slums. These differences tend to be flattened out in Canadian cities, so the nicest parts come off looking shabby.

One weird thing about Canada is that many cities here seem to be pretty laissez-faire about planning. HRM is changing a bit but up until very recently they did almost nothing deliberate to invest in the core. Meanwhile, in the US, many cities have been falling over themselves to build entertainment districts or even subsidize retailers. There's a happy medium between these two extremes, and it consists of investing carefully in practical, truly public infrastructure like transit and streetscaping.

When I lived in the USA, I used to say 'This is a very rich country but I've never seen such poverty'.

someone123
Sep 20, 2013, 3:54 AM
Former locations of the dockyard clock. This clock has been in the city since 1772:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/1269614_623336571049860_1010490906_o.jpg
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=623336571049860

The modern tower was built in 1996 and was already falling apart. Hopefully it will be replaced with something more suitable. Maybe it would even be worth it to recreate the original dockyard building as an attraction on the waterfront.

terrynorthend
Oct 6, 2013, 12:35 PM
This video has been floating around facebook. It runs about 3 minutes, and is a rare colour home film shot by someone crossing the Macdonald Bridge, starting on North Street and ending up at Victoria Road in Dartmouth. The post says it is from 1960. Of note are the 50's cars, the trolley crossing the bridge, no traffic lights at Wyse Road/Nantucket, and the giant ESSO sign up the hill in Dartmouth.

From facebook:

Macdonald Bridge 1960 (Halifax to Dartmouth, NS) (https://www.facebook.com/video/embed?video_id=10151944904743524)

"As we are talking about the ESSO sign on nantucket recently, and I got playing with my projector and video camera this evening, here's the silent film footage I have, circa 1960 of a trip across the Macdonald Bridge and up Nantucket. It's not perfect, as I don't have the proper facilities, but you can easily get the idea, especially the ESSO sign. The footage isn't totally silent....you hear the projector on the video. :0 enjoy. Thanks to my wife on her assistance with this." -- Scott Snailham

Credit Scott Snailham

someone123
Nov 13, 2013, 5:41 AM
Reposting from the Canada section:

Some archival Halifax photos from the WWII period. Originals can be found here (http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/).

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2891/10832260884_0d27bd07f0_o.png

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3781/10832420463_bb054804ef_o.png

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3757/10832421703_cdf53cb249_o.png

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5521/10832099325_4234985063_o.png

The ship off in the distance is the Queen Mary. Winston Churchill was one of the passengers -- he made a few secret visits across the Atlantic during WWII.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7433/10832261614_756cea4dab_o.png

ILoveHalifax
Nov 13, 2013, 11:18 AM
Quite amazing, there was residential at Sackville and Lower Water. I do remember the old Irving Oil building at the foot of Sackville.
I also remember Woods on Granville. They used to do a display of live baby chicks in their window for Easter.

Keith P.
Nov 13, 2013, 11:54 AM
Is that laundry on a clothesline on the roof of the Customs House? Were there residents there?

ILoveHalifax
Nov 13, 2013, 1:33 PM
Is that laundry on a clothesline on the roof of the Customs House? Were there residents there?

Very observant, maybe a janitor lived in the building.

beyeas
Nov 13, 2013, 2:06 PM
Is that laundry on a clothesline on the roof of the Customs House? Were there residents there?

Yeah I loved that photo for that reason. Interesting touch of "humanity" in a photo focused on historic architecture. Awesome.

Drybrain
Nov 13, 2013, 3:37 PM
The city looks so sooty and shabby back in that era. Still, can't help but think it would've been a pretty fascinating place during the wars, as the country's main Atlantic port.

OldDartmouthMark
Nov 13, 2013, 6:56 PM
Thanks for posting, someone123.

I really appreciate the interest you take in Halifax's historic buildings and neighborhoods. I truly enjoy the vintage pics that you post here!

:tup:

spaustin
Nov 14, 2013, 2:08 AM
Great photos! There very well could have been an apartment in the now gone Customs Building. A lot of old federal buildings had an apartment for the caretaker. Anyone know when the Customs Building came down? I know the addition to the Dominion Public Building was added in the 60s so my hunch is it would have been around then. Sad to see what use to stand on some of the long-standing vacant lots around Town.

resetcbu1
Nov 14, 2013, 2:38 AM
That ball park was nicknamed "Little Brooklyn" and was the home of the Dartmouth Arrows baseball team, part of the Halifax and District League, I believe. Minor league baseball was a big deal in the area back in the '40s and '50s with some local players even making it to the major leagues.

I don't know why the park was razed to make way for the Holiday Inn, but this is motivating me to do a little research on the topic. :cheers:

EDIT: Did a little searching on the net and found this history lesson on the Halifax and District Baseball League. Really interesting if you're a baseball fan, or just a student of local history. The story doesn't spell it out, but I'm guessing that the field was taken down as a result of the demise of the league, after 1959.

Here's the link:
http://www.museevirtuel-virtualmuseum.ca/sgc-cms/histoires_de_chez_nous-community_memories/pm_v2.php?id=story_line&lg=English&fl=0&ex=00000562&sl=4440&pos=1

Very COOL ! thanks for the link , OldDartmouthMark :cheers:

OldDartmouthMark
Nov 14, 2013, 7:04 PM
You're welcome! :tup:

mcmcclassic
Nov 29, 2013, 2:26 PM
Here's one I found at work sifting through some promo flyers for a company.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/c/12/j7p4.jpg (http://imageshack.com/i/0cj7p4j)

Jstaleness
Nov 30, 2013, 12:30 AM
Wow! we have been screaming for construction pics of the Purdy Buildings. Finally someone has delivered. Thank you

Aya_Akai
Feb 4, 2014, 3:14 AM
So- my grandfather has sold his home and has moved to one of the assisted living complexes in the city. One of the last things we found cleaning out the house was a box full of hundreds of old photos (my Grampy was a very avid camera enthusiast) I don't know how many more I'll find as this seems to be a bit of a "rejects" box (bad exposure, blurry developing errors etc) and a bunch seem to be family photos.. but I have found a few of around the city I've scanned, restored/touched up and would like to share with you guys! If you could help me maybe try and figure out what years these were taken.. it would be greatly appreciated!

(Click on the pictures if you'd like to see a larger image)
A couple from Dartmouth, first:

(looking down the large hill on Cole Harbour Road/Lawrencetown Road towards the beaches; exact year unknown)
http://i.imgur.com/3nFucyvl.jpg (http://i.imgur.com/3nFucyv.jpg)

(Looking Northbound on John Cross Drive towards the back of Prince Andrew/Akerley; exact year unknown)
http://i.imgur.com/okCYIayl.jpg (http://i.imgur.com/okCYIay.jpg)

http://i.imgur.com/6wBwRwll.jpg (http://i.imgur.com/6wBwRwl.jpg)


Now this is a quick panorama I whipped up using the following three photos after it. They were scanned at 1200dpi from an 8x10 contact sheet of 35mm proofs (the only one developed to a full picture was the last one above), so they aren't the highest of quality, but I think they turned out alright! (and they stitched together amazingly) I can't determine the exact year, but I think sometime around 1971.
http://i.imgur.com/09AQ8xD.jpg (http://i.imgur.com/09AQ8xD.jpg)

http://i.imgur.com/hvF9591l.jpg (http://i.imgur.com/hvF9591.jpg)

http://i.imgur.com/k3trEEJl.jpg (http://i.imgur.com/k3trEEJ.jpg)

http://i.imgur.com/LbGCxhdl.jpg (http://i.imgur.com/LbGCxhd.jpg)

I've got a couple taken from on the MacDonald Bridge (not sure an exact year on these, either):

http://i.imgur.com/uUvfBrTl.jpg (http://i.imgur.com/uUvfBrT.jpg)

http://i.imgur.com/zyQ1S1il.jpg (http://i.imgur.com/zyQ1S1i.jpg)

This one I found rather interesting with what's visible in the background, modelling credit to my Grandmother, and Uncle.. :haha:
http://i.imgur.com/tt2vrlul.jpg (http://i.imgur.com/tt2vrlu.jpg)

All photo credit goes to my Grandfather John Helliwell :haha: scans & retouching, and panorama done by me

Keith P.
Feb 4, 2014, 11:33 AM
Cool photos. The pano is no earlier than late 1973. The car in the right foreground is at earliest a 1974 model - you can tell by the large front bumper, which were required for the first time that year.

Wishblade
Feb 4, 2014, 2:13 PM
Cool photos. The pano is no earlier than late 1973. The car in the right foreground is at earliest a 1974 model - you can tell by the large front bumper, which were required for the first time that year.

And with the metro centre not even under construction yet, that would probably put the photograph around 1975.

OldDartmouthMark
Feb 4, 2014, 4:21 PM
Cool photos. The pano is no earlier than late 1973. The car in the right foreground is at earliest a 1974 model - you can tell by the large front bumper, which were required for the first time that year.

Actually 1973 was the first year for 5 mph bumpers - just getting nitpicky. The car in the foreground of the pano could be a 1973-75 Pontiac Lemans or Grand Am - front bumper corner, fender, sidemarker light were virtually the same for those 3 years.

The pic John Cross is likely early seventies. Foreground is a '71 - '73 fullsize GM (Pontiac?), a VW bug of unknown year, a couple of '69 Pontiacs, an unknown wagon, and a Ford Pinto (which was first built in 1971 - can't discern the year from the pic). :2cents:

To Halistreaks: Thanks for posting those! They are really neat to see. :tup:

fenwick16
Feb 23, 2014, 5:08 AM
I found this YouTube video showing downtown Halifax from the Citadel in the early 1960's before Scotia Square was built. Halifax looks much better today than it did back then. I first saw Halifax around 1969 - 1970 when I was very young and the ensuing modern architecture has made it a much nicer place to live, in my opinion.

I0aC3vAox5s

TheNovaScotian
Mar 1, 2014, 5:41 AM
I was digging around and found this and thought someone here might appreciate it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=mNAKpGV78R4

pblaauw
Mar 18, 2014, 4:07 AM
The first minute and a half, looping for a little over 6 minutes.

Halifax Nova Scotia 1970's (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RqM_DEE1yw)

Drybrain
Mar 18, 2014, 1:07 PM
The first minute and a half, looping for a little over 6 minutes.

Halifax Nova Scotia 1970's (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RqM_DEE1yw)

Around 1:20 you can see the old Bank of Nova Scotia building adjacent to the Provincial Building (AGNS gallery south), and the colour discrepancy is amazing. The Provincial Building was filthy.

OldDartmouthMark
Mar 18, 2014, 1:26 PM
Cool link - lots of buildings that I haven't seen in years, even in photos, such as:
- the old Irving station on Sackville St.,
- Citadel Motors with its neon Cadillac sign,
- the old St. Paul's rectory building on Argyle before it was reduced to part of a facade with a non-attractive office box built around it,
- the Moir's factory

Thanks! :tup:

someone123
Apr 1, 2014, 4:57 AM
A great old photo of the Neptune Theatre taken in the 60's:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/t1.0-9/10003996_729111870472329_1362870146_n.jpg
Source (https://www.facebook.com/VintageHalifax)

I like the building to the left next to the Tramway Building too!

Drybrain
Apr 1, 2014, 1:50 PM
I like the building to the left next to the Tramway Building too!

Yeah, what a great little narrow building. Too bad they didn't leave that when the built the new Neptune.

OldDartmouthMark
Apr 1, 2014, 6:08 PM
A great old photo of the Neptune Theatre taken in the 60's:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/t1.0-9/10003996_729111870472329_1362870146_n.jpg
Source (https://www.facebook.com/VintageHalifax)

I like the building to the left next to the Tramway Building too!

For the sake of accuracy, the photo is likely from the early '70s, from the '71 - '72 Mercury Comet in the photo.