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View Full Version : Wateridge Village development [Hemlock Rd, Codd's Rd] | U/C


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rocketphish
Jan 28, 2020, 12:41 AM
Mattamy can do better... their Bower Condos in Oakville are similar in scale, but far more pleasing to look at.

https://mattamyhomes.com/gta/closedcommunities/oakville-bower-condos-on-the-preserve.aspx

Marcus CLS
Feb 12, 2020, 1:08 PM
Ignore wrong thread

rocketphish
Mar 27, 2020, 10:17 PM
It looks like Uniform Urban Developments has picked up a few more blocks in Wateridge. "We are presently sold out at Wateridge Village, but Future Phases are COMING SOON in 2020 including towns, semis, and singles!".

https://i.imgur.com/kvNrzNH.png

https://uniformdevelopments.com/new-homes/wateridge-village-at-rockcliffe/#

rocketphish
Jun 14, 2020, 3:12 AM
Mattamy' 360 Condos have undergone some changes. Updated exterior designs, increased unit count (up from 357 to 421) and vastly reduced ground floor commercial spaces (down from 2088m2 to 786m2).

https://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__A2P3D2


Siteplan:

https://i.imgur.com/n2BkSNP.png


Renderings:

https://i.imgur.com/2N2ReW1.png

https://i.imgur.com/QTxMJ8n.png

https://i.imgur.com/CE4J9Z9.png

kwoldtimer
Jun 14, 2020, 1:51 PM
Condos?

rocketphish
Jun 14, 2020, 4:36 PM
Condos?

Yes. https://mattamyhomes.com/ottawa/communities/wateridge-360-condos-by-mattamy

Glenlivet Ave
Jun 15, 2020, 11:15 AM
I drove through this neighbourhood yesterday to get a sense of what's been built so far and it didn't feel urban to me. More like an extremely dense version of suburbia without direct access to retail and services you get in an urban setting.

I understand that it's in it's early phases still so I'll reserve judgement but the contrast between this neighbourhood and the adjacent Rothwell Heights or Manor Park are stark.

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 12:00 PM
I drove through this neighbourhood yesterday to get a sense of what's been built so far and it didn't feel urban to me. More like an extremely dense version of suburbia without direct access to retail and services you get in an urban setting.

I understand that it's in it's early phases still so I'll reserve judgement but the contrast between this neighbourhood and the adjacent Rothwell Heights or Manor Park are stark.

To be fair, none of the mixed-use or employment areas have yet been built, although I'm sceptical of how much commercial/retail the area will be able to support. It does seem to me to be destined to be very self-contained rather than any sort of "destination".

TransitZilla
Jun 15, 2020, 12:23 PM
I drove through this neighbourhood yesterday to get a sense of what's been built so far and it didn't feel urban to me. More like an extremely dense version of suburbia without direct access to retail and services you get in an urban setting.

I understand that it's in it's early phases still so I'll reserve judgement but the contrast between this neighbourhood and the adjacent Rothwell Heights or Manor Park are stark.

Isn’t something like the Glebe also basically a “dense version of suburbia”? In fact it was a suburb when first built.

Retail in a brand new neighborhood is tough- it’s a chicken and the egg thing. There needs to be residents to support it, but for early residents, there is no existing retail to attract them.

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 12:36 PM
Isn’t something like the Glebe also basically a “dense version of suburbia”? In fact it was a suburb when first built.

Retail in a brand new neighborhood is tough- it’s a chicken and the egg thing. There needs to be residents to support it, but for early residents, there is no existing retail to attract them.

I am suddenly reminded of the look of pure horror I got many years ago from a very proud new homeowner in the Glebe when I casually referred to the Glebe as "the suburbs" (Ottawa for me at the time was Centretown and Lowertown, full stop.). :haha:

OTownandDown
Jun 15, 2020, 3:03 PM
I drove through this neighbourhood yesterday to get a sense of what's been built so far and it didn't feel urban to me. More like an extremely dense version of suburbia without direct access to retail and services you get in an urban setting.

I understand that it's in it's early phases still so I'll reserve judgement but the contrast between this neighbourhood and the adjacent Rothwell Heights or Manor Park are stark.

You mean to tell me that when the developers marketed this area as a new village within a City with several shoehorned-in townhomes, that it was not feasible to have a fully fleshed out commercial district that was self supporting and that outsiders would want to visit?? I'm SHOCKED I tell you. SHOCKED.

Edit: Ok I'll give some credit for splitting this area into developable areas and letting different developers put their spin on it, and for going with a commercial mix in some areas. Its better than the 1960's megablocks we're still correcting elsewhere.

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 4:10 PM
I've forgotten, what is the population of the area expected to be, once it's fully built out?

phil235
Jun 15, 2020, 5:01 PM
I am suddenly reminded of the look of pure horror I got many years ago from a very proud new homeowner in the Glebe when I casually referred to the Glebe as "the suburbs" (Ottawa for me at the time was Centretown and Lowertown, full stop.). :haha:

The Glebe was definitely a suburb back in the day.

To be fair, there is a pretty big difference between a streetcar suburb from the turn of the century and what we normally call suburbia.

Uhuniau
Jun 15, 2020, 6:52 PM
Edit: Ok I'll give some credit for splitting this area into developable areas and letting different developers put their spin on it, and for going with a commercial mix in some areas. Its better than the 1960's megablocks we're still correcting elsewhere.

Where are we correcting any of our 60s mistakes?

Uhuniau
Jun 15, 2020, 6:53 PM
Isn’t something like the Glebe also basically a “dense version of suburbia”? In fact it was a suburb when first built.

The term "suburb" has developed such a different connotation in the past 70 years, that I'd be wary of comparing its use now to its use when "suburbs" like the Glebe developed.

Postmaster
Jun 15, 2020, 7:38 PM
Nothing but functional. Ottawa Style. They should leave a few acres of tree stumps to represent our architectural diversity in this city.

Multi-modal
Jun 15, 2020, 8:28 PM
It does seem to me to be destined to be very self-contained rather than any sort of "destination".

This development was always destined to be pretty isolated. They did geography and surrounding development basically limited them to 3 access points. And the low-density residential to the south really creates a barrier to walk to the existing Montreal Road "arterial mainstreet".

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 8:40 PM
The Glebe was definitely a suburb back in the day.

To be fair, there is a pretty big difference between a streetcar suburb from the turn of the century and what we normally call suburbia.

Indeed, although not in the late 1980s, when I made the comment (innocently, I swear!).

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 8:43 PM
This development was always destined to be pretty isolated. They did geography and surrounding development basically limited them to 3 access points. And the low-density residential to the south really creates a barrier to walk to the existing Montreal Road "arterial mainstreet".

I keep forgetting - is it the plan to eventually restore Hemlock as an access point?

rocketphish
Jun 15, 2020, 9:28 PM
I've forgotten, what is the population of the area expected to be, once it's fully built out?

10,000 to 15,000, according to most articles I've seen, going all the way back to the beginning:
http://www.skyscraperpage.com/forum/showpost.php?p=3194419&postcount=3

rocketphish
Jun 15, 2020, 9:28 PM
I keep forgetting - is it the plan to eventually restore Hemlock as an access point?

Yes, the most recent maps still show Hemlock as an access point:
http://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showpost.php?p=8386509&postcount=578

lrt's friend
Jun 15, 2020, 10:36 PM
Do we never learn?

All there needs to be is a square with a park in the middle with benches etc, and retail and services on the outside of the square, right in the centre of the community. Surely 10,000 to 15,000 could support a grocery store, drug store, a few restaurants (with outdoor patios), a community centre, a hairdresser, maybe a few professional offices. Make it pedestrian and bike oriented as possible to make it a pleasant place to visit without the need of a car and massive parking lots.

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 11:28 PM
Do we never learn?

All there needs to be is a square with a park in the middle with benches etc, and retail and services on the outside of the square, right in the centre of the community. Surely 10,000 to 15,000 could support a grocery store, drug store, a few restaurants (with outdoor patios), a community centre, a hairdresser, maybe a few professional offices. Make it pedestrian and bike oriented as possible to make it a pleasant place to visit without the need of a car and massive parking lots.

There is a rather nice park/playground/plaza already in place immediately to the west of the latest proposed mixed use project, and another small plaza is planned kitty corner to it, again in the mixed use area (I'm assuming this is the planned "town square"). Although the commercial space planned for the new project is limited (under 800sq metres), it is adjacent to those park areas. I assume that there will be a community centre, but I don't know where it will be located (co-located with one of the schools, perhaps?).

Multi-modal
Jun 15, 2020, 11:46 PM
I keep forgetting - is it the plan to eventually restore Hemlock as an access point?

Yes, I believe so. It appears to be part of Phase 2:http://www.wateridge.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Wateridge-Village-Phasing-Plan-Jan-4-2018.pdf

rocketphish
Sep 4, 2020, 1:31 AM
Mattamy' 360 Condos have undergone further changes. Updated exterior designs, decreased unit count (down from 421 to 399) and, thanks to community pressure, reinstated ground floor commercial spaces (from 786m2 back up to 2103m2).

https://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__A2P3D2

Siteplan:

https://i.imgur.com/36CPLMN.png


Renderings:

https://i.imgur.com/bgCQWbQ.png

https://i.imgur.com/pOVbCVz.png

FutureWickedCity
Sep 4, 2020, 12:56 PM
Reminds me of an 80s social housing project (e.g. Chapel/Mann Avenue)

OTSkyline
Sep 4, 2020, 5:26 PM
Yeah, this is barferoni. This prime land was supposed to be something special and had so much potential.

Lost opportunity for Ottawa again...

J.OT13
Sep 5, 2020, 12:22 PM
This whole development is basically Ottawa's version of Le Plateau on the Gatineau side; just a denser suburb.

eastcanman
Sep 8, 2020, 1:14 AM
Ugh, such a disappointment. This was supposed to be an easy and obvious open-net shot to get another proper urban neighbourhood in Ottawa. I know times are tough for commercial rentals, but it's not as though you need an absurd amount of new street-level walk-in commercial to really amplify the urbanity of a neighbourhood - see Old Ottawa East.

If I were one of people who purchased the first wave of homes finished in the Wateridge at premium expecting to be near the heart of a trendy new urban neighbourhood, I'd be absolutely livid.

TransitZilla
Sep 8, 2020, 1:23 AM
Architecture aside, I don't see the problem here. There are ground floor retail units there.

The commercial will come with time; it's a chicken-and-egg problem. Nobody is going to open a retail or service business in the middle of nowhere; there needs to be a critical mass of residents.

IIRC I think Hemlock is supposed to be the main commercial street, and I think this will be the first development to actually front onto Hemlock.

Jayday23
Sep 8, 2020, 1:41 AM
Ugh, such a disappointment. This was supposed to be an easy and obvious open-net shot to get another proper urban neighbourhood in Ottawa. I know times are tough for commercial rentals, but it's not as though you need an absurd amount of new street-level walk-in commercial to really amplify the urbanity of a neighbourhood - see Old Ottawa East.

If I were one of people who purchased the first wave of homes finished in the Wateridge at premium expecting to be near the heart of a trendy new urban neighbourhood, I'd be absolutely livid.

"A diversity of built form to reflect social diversity". Its actually embarrassing how far low this project has fallen.

http://wwuploads.googlepages.com/rockcliffedensityresize.jpg

Harley613
Sep 8, 2020, 2:36 AM
This whole development is basically Ottawa's version of Le Plateau on the Gatineau side; just a denser suburb.

I think Le Plateau is the best suburban development in the region so I'll take that as a good thing :haha:

J.OT13
Sep 8, 2020, 2:14 PM
I think Le Plateau is the best suburban development in the region so I'll take that as a good thing :haha:

I like some of the recent work in Le Plateau, like the Agora area, and I would love to see some of that in Ottawa, but the 2000-2015 walk-ups are horrendous; copy-paste the same 5-6 designs over and over again, surrounded by acres of parking.

I have a love-hate relationship with the area.

Uhuniau
Sep 9, 2020, 2:49 AM
This whole development is basically Ottawa's version of Le Plateau on the Gatineau side; just a denser suburb.

And not even that much denser. But you'll hardly be able to stand, from all that vibrant "green" space, vibrating away. So vibrant!

Harley613
Sep 9, 2020, 2:58 AM
I like some of the recent work in Le Plateau, like the Agora area, and I would love to see some of that in Ottawa, but the 2000-2015 walk-ups are horrendous; copy-paste the same 5-6 designs over and over again, surrounded by acres of parking.

I have a love-hate relationship with the area.

I agree about the appearance of those older walkups but I still think they are by far the nicest thing for the price anywhere within 30 minutes of downtown (and they are only 10 minutes away) so they have their place. Those are mostly located in just a single area centering on Boulevard d'Plateau and Des Grives. The majority of the older neighbourhood consists of rather nice single family homes for the price.

eastcanman
Sep 9, 2020, 8:05 AM
I think the positive talk about the Plateau misses the point; "Wateridge is nice for a sister-city commuter suburb" is a pretty dire description for a development that was supposed to represent a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for a brand-new, dense, walkable urban neighbourhood near the heart of the nation's capital. Maybe we can build the world's nicest Winners on the LeBreton Flats while we're at it.

Jokes aside... a lot of these ridiculous development letdowns could be avoided if the City of Ottawa would start drawing some hard lines on the quality of work it expects from developers and the degree of post-approval deviation from that quality bar that the City willing to tolerate (which should, ideally, be near-zero).

Acajack
Sep 9, 2020, 2:36 PM
I like some of the recent work in Le Plateau, like the Agora area, and I would love to see some of that in Ottawa, but the 2000-2015 walk-ups are horrendous; copy-paste the same 5-6 designs over and over again, surrounded by acres of parking.

I have a love-hate relationship with the area.

I feel the same way. In terms of the SFH areas the oldest easternmost area near St-Raymond is actually very nice for that type of suburban area. It's similarly nice to Rothwell Heights in Ottawa though quite a bit younger (30 years old vs. 50+ years old) or maybe Côte-d'Azur on the other side of the Gatineau River.

But the SFH areas that are newer going west... something bugs me about them. It's just a sea of cookie-cutter "similarity". It's a bit lusher, there is less vinyl siding visible and the colour palettes of homes are brighter but it reminds me too much of a Quebec version of Orleans-Barrhaven-Kanata-Stittsville.

Jayday23
Sep 11, 2020, 1:17 AM
interesting perspectives. The place is a bit of a archetictual wastland though if you ask me. Still hasn't changed.

rocketphish
Oct 9, 2020, 5:12 PM
Uniform Urban Developments is proposing to construct a planned unit development PUD) at 475 Wanaki Road in Wateridge Village, consisting of five (5) wood frame, lowrise (3-storey) apartment buildings, with the intent to create a residential-scaled neighbourhood on the site that contributes to the overall aesthetic of development in Wateridge Village.

Each of the five (5) apartment buildings will include 24 units, for a total of 120 units on the site. Each apartment building will include 1-bedroom, 1-bedroom + den, 2-bedroom, 2-bedroom + den, and 3-bedroom units, ranging in size from approximately 73 m2 to 130 m2 (784 ft2 to 1,400 ft2). The gross floor area per apartment building will be 2,183 m2 (23,500 ft2), for a total gross floor area of 10,915 m2 (117,500 ft2) on the site. The units are intended to be rental apartments, for which there is a need in the neighbourhood. The proposed apartment buildings will front on all four streets surrounding the site, with barrier-free entrances at grade. Each apartment building will include a generous lobby space, with elevators.

In addition, each apartment building will include three storeys of residential units, and a fourth level of underground parking for residents.

Architect: Hobin Architecture


Development application:
https://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__B0PBSL

Location:

https://i.imgur.com/lwhBOFM.png


Siteplan:

https://i.imgur.com/2iL3omo.png


Renderings:

https://i.imgur.com/uh9ABoL.png

https://i.imgur.com/Acy4f67.png

https://i.imgur.com/5u8J1Gt.png

https://i.imgur.com/zrdMwZ7.png

https://i.imgur.com/3Rd1Pzo.png

https://i.imgur.com/LVx2FWK.png

https://i.imgur.com/CEWeqAf.png

https://i.imgur.com/SMBoDBE.png

J.OT13
Oct 9, 2020, 5:32 PM
Very nice. And no surface parking! It can be done!

Dzingle Bells
Oct 9, 2020, 8:02 PM
This is great! The architecture is fine but as @J.OT13 pointed out, the limited surface parking is really what makes this. Kids growing up here are going to love running around that courtyard and parents will be able to let it happen without worrying about cars. This should be emulated in Kanata/Barrhaven/Orleans.

OTownandDown
Oct 13, 2020, 1:46 PM
The way this land is being divvied up with lax rules, resulting in these ridiculous blocks that will end up being a low-income ghetto in 15 years really points out the limitations of the real estate group at the City, the planning office, and all levels of government.

There's a difference between paying an architect $200k for a 'master plan' and implementing that plan. The planning gets dumbed down to the most basic level, and you end up with a group of separate development companies trying to profit as much as possible within the dumbed rules and their single blocks.

The City needs to actually get innovative when it comes to real estate and planning working 'as a team' with the public and developers. Other Cities have actually built Development Corporations with actors from every sector, and managed to design and build to a master plan. You set the parcels, you set their use and design limitations, and you stick to it. If the developer likes the idea for the parcel, they buy it and build. If they don't like what's proposed for that land, they move on.

In the end, it's the ultimate in socialism (or..communism? lol, I'm not sure), having the government design land, but if you have enough sectors on the larger committee setting the design, it sometimes works a bit better than a wide-open market for profiteers.

I'm mostly talking about Rive Gauche in Paris. WestSideAction did a good article about it and several other 'planned' european neighbourhoods a couple years ago.

kwoldtimer
Oct 13, 2020, 2:18 PM
I would have thought that the involvement of several developers was one of Wateridge's strong points. :shrug:

It may be many things, and I find the aesthetic a bit austere, but "low income ghetto" it most certainly ain't.

OTownandDown
Oct 13, 2020, 2:52 PM
I would have thought that the involvement of several developers was one on Wateridge's strong points. :shrug:

It may be many things, and I find the aesthetic a bit austere, but "low income ghetto" it most certainly ain't.

Nobody develops empty land into an out-of-the-way, super-dense, non-transparent (opaque) set of single-use residential buildings with the intention of it becoming a ghetto. It just happens naturally.

In 10 years these will transfer from owner-occupied into rentals for another 5-10, and from rentals into cheap rentals in the ensuing 5-10.

Mind you, I don't know that for sure, I'm just being pessimistic. You never know. I suppose the surrounding neighbourhoods have managed to keep it together over the years.

BenYOW
Apr 9, 2021, 5:21 PM
Aerial view of construction progress as of April 8, 2021:

https://i.imgur.com/MPLlyCa.jpg?1

phil235
Apr 9, 2021, 6:47 PM
Aerial view of construction progress as of April 8, 2021:

https://i.imgur.com/MPLlyCa.jpg?1

Little Barrhaven takes shape!

J.OT13
Apr 9, 2021, 7:39 PM
Massive lost opportunity.

Truenorth00
Apr 10, 2021, 12:24 AM
Massive lost opportunity.

Seriously. What they've done here is so gross. What they've squandered here is both offensive and heartbreaking. That much land, so close to the core and the water. And look what they did with it.

lrt's friend
Apr 10, 2021, 1:04 AM
Not really 'Little Barrhaven'. The real Barrhaven will be connected to rapid transit. This development will never be connected.

This project demonstrates that it is impossible to build a new 'urban' neighbourhood in the 21st century.

At least it will be close to the new Costco on Ogilvie. The new residents will be flooding there, by car of course.

TransitZilla
Apr 10, 2021, 2:03 AM
I think you are being too harsh. None of the blocks that are supposed to form the higher-density core of this neighbourhood have been built yet. Those blocks are supposed to be mixed-use as well, but there is a chicken-and-egg problem: you can't get commercial when you don't have any residents yet.

I have faith this will come together eventually, though it is taking longer than I would have hoped.

EDIT: The fist "core" block is in the works and it looks like the 1st building is sold out if Mattamy's website is to be believed: https://mattamyhomes.com/ontario/ottawa/ottawa/360-condos-by-mattamy

Jayday23
Apr 10, 2021, 2:07 AM
agreed

TransitZilla
Apr 10, 2021, 2:46 AM
Politicans in this city are so scared of zoning something as a traditional main street. Remember all the uproar about rezoning Bronson? If they actually wanted to hold these developers in check (they didn't), they would have had a guts to do it in at least one of the main roads in this place.

Hemlock is supposed to be the main street.

FWIW, the block at Hemlock/Codd's/Mikinak (e.g. Mattamy's 360 condos) has been redesigned from the original submission and they are now planning at-grade retail along all 4 frontages of the block.

https://devapps.ottawa.ca/en/applications/D07-12-18-0086/details

Truenorth00
Apr 10, 2021, 6:45 PM
Not really 'Little Barrhaven'. The real Barrhaven will be connected to rapid transit. This development will never be connected.

This project demonstrates that it is impossible to build a new 'urban' neighbourhood in the 21st century.


Urban neighborhoods are built all over the world without rapid transit connections.

What they should've have built here is a lot of mid-rise, three storey towns and enough mixed use to substantially be a 15 min neighbourhood. Bus service would have been just fine then.

rocketphish
Apr 10, 2021, 7:14 PM
Urban neighborhoods are built all over the world without rapid transit connections.

What they should've have built here is a lot of mid-rise, three storey towns and enough mixed use to substantially be a 15 min neighbourhood. Bus service would have been just fine then.

I agree with bradnixon. The vast majority of this site is planned to be between 3-story and high-rise residential (the whole red-shaded area of the site map) including a substantial area of mixed-use in the centre, but that's not what they started building first. I think you just need to give it some time. This is probably a 20-year project.

https://i.imgur.com/Z8Wy0RJ.png

phil235
Apr 10, 2021, 7:28 PM
I agree with bradnixon. The vast majority of this site is planned to be between 3-story and high-rise residential (the whole red-shaded area of the site map) including a substantial area of mixed-use in the centre, but that's not what they started building first. I think you just need to give it some time. This is probably a 20-year project.


I hope you’re right. Right now it feels like those semi-dense development in a field projects that you see at the edge of town, that are totally disconnected from anything around them. I have my doubts that this will ever be well-integrated into the city, either by foot or by transit.

Truenorth00
Apr 10, 2021, 10:00 PM
I agree with bradnixon. The vast majority of this site is planned to be between 3-story and high-rise residential (the whole red-shaded area of the site map) including a substantial area of mixed-use in the centre, but that's not what they started building first. I think you just need to give it some time. This is probably a 20-year project.


I'm suspicious of developers who put down all or most of their single family homes first. How long before they start pressuring the city for a break on zoning?

They could have built the denser bits first and had a whole community present, getting them a substantial premium on their single family homes later. Their choice to go with the towns first says a lot.

rocketphish
Apr 10, 2021, 10:39 PM
I'm suspicious of developers who put down all or most of their single family homes first. How long before they start pressuring the city for a break on zoning?

They could have built the denser bits first and had a whole community present, getting them a substantial premium on their single family homes later. Their choice to go with the towns first says a lot.

This site isn't owned by a single developer. It's owned by Canada Lands, who are selling off blocks, with specific minimum residential densities, in a particular order. The developers are just building what they have agreed to build (for the most part) on the blocks they purchased. Mattamy, in fact, successfully increased (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showpost.php?p=8586984&postcount=579) the density on their second (and largest) parcel after realizing the demand for their smaller denser back-to-back stacked townhomes.

So you should be suspicious of Canada Lands' master plan, if you need to be suspicious of anything.

rocketphish
Apr 10, 2021, 11:12 PM
Here's a closeup view of Mattamy's Wateridge towns and stacked towns, from CLC's website. This certainly isn't my cup of tea, but it does seem pretty dense for low-mid rise.

And incidentally, they seem to be selling like hotcakes on the resale market:
https://www.redfin.ca/on/ottawa/533-Ozawa-Pvt-K1K/home/174771662
https://www.redfin.ca/on/ottawa/520-Ozawa-Pvt-K1K/home/174779918

https://i.imgur.com/Lit6Yod.png (https://www.clc-sic.ca/sites/default/files/styles/16_9_scale_and_crop_large/public/images/Real-estate---Wateridge-Village---aerial-view.jpg)

https://www.clc-sic.ca/real-estate/wateridge-village

YOWetal
Apr 12, 2021, 8:37 AM
I'm suspicious of developers who put down all or most of their single family homes first. How long before they start pressuring the city for a break on zoning?

They could have built the denser bits first and had a whole community present, getting them a substantial premium on their single family homes later. Their choice to go with the towns first says a lot.

I'm not sure I follow. You think developers prefer SFH where they can build towns or apartments? Of course developers want to put as many units as they can to maximize profit. This site is already very dense for its location and access to transit.

It will be interesting to see what it looks like in 20 years. I think there is a high probability it becomes very much run down as those small town houses and apartments become lower priced rentals as they degrade. This is why communities fight to keep their neighbourhoods only SFH. Well and classism racism, but not only.

lrt's friend
Apr 12, 2021, 8:33 PM
I'm not sure I follow. You think developers prefer SFH where they can build towns or apartments? Of course developers want to put as many units as they can to maximize profit. This site is already very dense for its location and access to transit.

It will be interesting to see what it looks like in 20 years. I think there is a high probability it becomes very much run down as those small town houses and apartments become lower priced rentals as they degrade. This is why communities fight to keep their neighbourhoods only SFH. Well and classism racism, but not only.

I will need to have a close look and have a walk around. It depends on build quality and the public amenities and the overall community design.

There is a tendency to cheap out on the details. I would hope for quality walkways and good landscaping including opportunities for individual home owners. If everything is pretty well paved over, there is a good chance of degradation over time.

danduc
Apr 12, 2021, 11:58 PM
Looks like Philadelphia Row house. Will be fun next snowstorm. Where do you blow the snow?

Uhuniau
Apr 16, 2021, 4:01 AM
Massive lost opportunity.

There is no opportunity too massive for this city to lose.

rocketphish
Apr 16, 2021, 9:08 PM
Newly opened Veterans' House receives additional $1.5M in government funds
“Veterans' House is a safety net for those willing to put their lives on the line for our country."

Jon Willing, Ottawa Citizen
Publishing date: Apr 16, 2021 • 56 minutes ago • 2 minute read

https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/ottawacitizen/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/ab7o8927_83710280-w.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=750

A newly opened building in Ottawa providing affordable rental units and support services to homeless veterans received another $1.5 million from the upper governments on Friday.

Local federal cabinet minister Mona Fortier and Ontario cabinet minister Lisa MacLeod appeared at a virtual funding announcement for Veterans’ House with Mayor Jim Watson and Coun. Matthew Luloff, the army veteran who co-chairs a local veterans task force.

Also at the announcement was Bill Beaton, who was a corporal in the air force. He started moving into Veterans’ House at the end of February after falling in and out of homelessness over the past two years.

“Veterans’ House is a safety net for those willing to put their lives on the line for our country,” Beaton said, highlighting the theme of “teamwork” at the facility and drawing a parallel to the teamwork required in military life. He said he was grateful to have a home again.

Watson pointed out that a 2018 analysis of the homeless population in Ottawa discovered that five per cent, or 65 people, were military or RCMP veterans.

The not-for-profit Multifaith Housing Initiative runs Veterans’ House, which has been named the Andy Carswell Building, located at 745 Mikinak Rd. in the redeveloped lands of the former CFB Rockcliffe.

Suzanne Le, executive director of Multifaith Housing Initiative, said the building, a first of its kind in Canada, opened in February after an eight-year planning and construction period. Le said it’s a model that she anticipates will be replicated across the country.

Donations have also supported the creation of Veterans’ House. Le said government support is critical since the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the project’s fundraising campaign.

The 40 apartments are fully furnished and the facility has on-site mental health and addiction support services. Tenants can stay for as long as they need to.

Le said about half of the units were rented so far, with another 10-15 people going through the intake process.

The new funding comes from the Canada-Ontario Community Housing Initiative.

The federal government previously provided $6.5 million for the $11.5-million Veterans’ House project. The feds also provided the land for the project and the municipal government has contributed $760,000.

jwilling@postmedia.com
twitter.com/JonathanWilling

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/newly-opened-veterans-house-receives-additional-1-5m-in-government-funds

lrt's friend
Apr 16, 2021, 10:27 PM
Looks like Philadelphia Row house. Will be fun next snowstorm. Where do you blow the snow?

Truck it out at great expense. If they are public streets, then we all pay. If they are private streets, up go the condo fees.

Mikeed
Apr 17, 2021, 3:26 PM
I actually don't think that's to bad. If the price is right.

It's actually pretty high density, but I get a garage and I'm living in the city.

Isn't the density of most cities built on townhouses and terraced housing?

Snow looks like a concern but there's actually a fair amount of space assuming no curbside parking.

J.OT13
Apr 17, 2021, 4:29 PM
Happy to see these Vets housing blocks go up. Long time coming.

TransitZilla
Apr 18, 2021, 2:13 AM
Looks like Philadelphia Row house. Will be fun next snowstorm. Where do you blow the snow?

Hard to please this forum, eh?

"Lost opportunity!! Not dense enough!!!!!"

"Hey, were do you put the snow? No setbacks!!!"

:haha:

Richard Eade
Apr 18, 2021, 2:34 PM
But both concerns are real. There needs to be density, but it can’t be a ‘Designed for the Southern-States’-type of density. Reality needs to be taken into account.

Perhaps, the designers need to be a bit more creative to solve both problems. Perhaps only make narrow, one-way streets, so that there is snow storage space on the side. Maybe use a peripheral parking structure and only pedestrian pathways within a dense housing group.

There are ways to get (relatively) low-cost density while still designing for the environment.

Of course, as we are seeing now, that environment needs to also have enough outdoor space for the number of people being housed. One solution for that might be to take low-level (probably only single story) parking structures and cover them with dirt and grass. Add shrubs, too. And, while you are at it, take a few of the parking spots and make them large ‘planters’ for some full-sized trees. Play structures and open space are both needed.

Density is desirable, but the design must also be practical and livable.

waterloowarrior
Apr 18, 2021, 2:52 PM
Wish they made Mattamy stick with the original vision
https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showpost.php?p=7954619&postcount=480

Wateridge Village Phase 1B (Mattamy)

Mattamy Homes has acquired four Blocks in Wateridge Village Phase 1B at Rockcliffe Subdivision, developed by Canada Lands Company. The Blocks are identified as Block 15, Block 19, Block 22, and Block 24. Mattamy is currently pursuing Site Plan Control approval for the development of Block 15, Block 22, and Block 24

Mattamy has designed these Blocks with middle housing types of rear lane townhouse (RLT) and stacked townhouse dwellings. These housing types will form a community that provides a gradual transition of the housing landscape and densities between the existing residential areas and the Wateridge Village core.


Site:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4502/23891275988_812e809fbb_h.jpg


Elevations:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4493/37712296782_c028a22728_h.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4496/23891276228_ba7eb8d4c8_h.jpg


Renderings:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4461/23891276358_d2ace142d4_o.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4474/37712296252_2899c4e2bc_o.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4461/23891275688_3077242ba6_o.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4473/37712296642_f05c1b1b2b_o.jpg


From: http://webcast.ottawa.ca/plan/All_Image Referencing_Site Plan Application_Image Reference_2017-09-29 Urban Design Review Panel Formal Submission1.PDF

J.OT13
Apr 18, 2021, 3:13 PM
That was far better. That's the original proposal they won the right to develop with?

rocketphish
Apr 18, 2021, 4:08 PM
That was far better. That's the original proposal they won the right to develop with?

Yes, and it's exactly what they delivered on their first development block, outlined in red, though the landscaping isn't complete yet. I went and checked it out.

It's the blue block, which is nearing completion, where they sought and received a 50% density increase, and in the process eliminated the two planned pedestrian mews features. Mattamy was probably fine with that as they appear to be tricky and expensive amenities to install. Makes for a less friendly neighbourhood though.

It looks like they've just started site prep on the yellow block.

https://i.imgur.com/6soUyMp.png

J.OT13
Apr 18, 2021, 4:32 PM
With more density, it should have increased thenpedestrian streets' feasibility. When CanLands or the NCC awards development rights, they should include conditions protecting architectural styles and pecestrian/cyclist areas.

Catenary
Apr 19, 2021, 5:41 PM
Mattamy was probably fine with that as they appear to be tricky and expensive amenities to install. Makes for a less friendly neighbourhood though.

They look like a nightmare from a snow removal perspective. Just imagine what it will look like after the contractor's sidewalk plow has been there a few dozen times backing into everything as they try and navigate the tight corners, the blade catching on the pavers and decking.

rocketphish
Apr 30, 2021, 12:49 AM
Cleared for landing — Ottawa Veterans' House receives donated Canso cockpit
The cockpit's new home is a fitting one as Veterans’ House is located on the grounds of the former CFB Rockcliffe airbase.

Zachary Delaney, Ottawa Citizen
Publishing date: Apr 29, 2021 • 1 hour ago • 2 minute read

https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/ottawacitizen/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/ab7o9415_83928644-w.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=850

A partial cockpit from a famed Canso aircraft landed Thursday morning at the Ottawa Veterans’ House as the first-of-its-kind facility continues to welcome new residents.

The half-ton piece of aviation history — transported by truck to Ottawa from California and donated by the Carswell family and Canso Investment Council Ltd. — was carefully loaded into place at the front of the housing facility by a crane and guided by a small crew.

The cockpit’s new home is a fitting one as Veterans’ House is located on the grounds of the former CFB Rockcliffe airbase, which was used in both world wars.

“I’ve been excited to see this,” said Suzanne Le, executive director of the Multifaith Housing Initiative, the group behind Veterans’ House, as she watched the crane lift and place the section of the airplane onto a slab of concrete near the back patio. As it sits in place, it looks as if the plane is flying out of the building.

Opened in February, Veterans’ House provides housing for veterans experiencing homelessness, with residents also enjoying access to rehabilitative services, gathering spaces, an indoor gym and dog park. The facility is also known as the Andy Carswell Building, in honour of the Royal Canadian Airforce pilot and veteran of the Second World War.

John Carswell, Andy’s son, is the president and chief investment officer of Canso Investment — the area at Veterans’ House is named the Canso Campus.

The donated cockpit comes from a PBY-5A aircraft, now popularly in Canada as a Canso, which Andy flew regularly during his time in the service.

Cansos were used by several different air forces around the world, including Canada, the U.S. and Britain. They were used in the Second World War to help in the Battle of the Atlantic to seek out and destroy enemy U-boats. But they were also used to help with search and rescue missions around the world, a legacy the campus hopes to tap into.

In fact, Andy was a well renowned Canso search and rescue pilot, carrying out several challenging post-war missions in British Columbia that earned him an award for bravery presented by Queen Elizabeth.

The Veterans House project has been in the making since 2013, with construction starting in September 2019. The pandemic delayed completion but the house is now open and already half full.

“People didn’t realize it was an issue,” Le said of veterans experiencing homelessness in Canada.

“Once people realize[d] that we have veterans living on our streets, there really [was] a strong support for doing something about it.”

Le, who has worked on the project since its inception in 2013, credited the community and all three levels of government for coming together to build Veterans’ House.

It’s expected to house 40 veterans when full.


M_RklmjaeCA


Canso Investment Council is an investor in Postmedia, which owns this newspaper.

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/cleared-for-landing-ottawa-veterans-house-receives-donated-canso-cockpit

rocketphish
Jun 4, 2021, 10:21 PM
Ottawa Community Housing Corporation (OCH) is proposing the development of their parcel in Wateridge Village, municipally known as 715 Mikinak Road, which is bound by Hemlock Road to the north, Bareille-Snow Street to the west, Mikinak Road to the south, and Michael Stoqua Street to the east.

The proposed development consists of two seven-storey buildings (Buildings A & B) fronting onto Hemlock Road and Barielle- Snow Street, as well as a four-storey building (Building C) fronting onto Mikinak Road. The proposed use is primarily residential (271 units), with additional community-focussed non-residential space allocated on the ground floor of each building. The triad of buildings are arranged to provide an active street frontage on Hemlock Road and Mikinak Road. Building A is “L-shaped” and steps down to three-storeys on the Barielle-Snow Street frontage, whereas Building B is a block of seven-storeys and steps down to six-storeys as it approaches Mikinak Road and Building C. Buildings A and B both have a 2-meter step back at the fourth storey facing the street to provide building articulation and a visual base.

A total of 122 parking spaces are proposed on the subject property: 96 residential spaces and 26 visitor spaces. A total of 6 barrier-free parking spaces are provided. A total of 210 bicycle parking spaces are proposed on site, including 206 residential spaces (116 indoor and 90 outdoor spaces), as well as 4 outdoor commercial spaces.

Not the Architect: RLA Architecture
Architect: IBI Group


Development application:
https://devapps.ottawa.ca/en/applications/D07-12-21-0068/details

Location:

https://i.imgur.com/BhtdZvA.png


Siteplan:

https://i.imgur.com/0lw2v9V.png


Renderings:

https://i.imgur.com/QJKawR5.png

https://i.imgur.com/I6XrWCN.png

https://i.imgur.com/zVQxDEA.png

https://i.imgur.com/Ca1vIIm.png

https://i.imgur.com/pNGiVw9.png

https://i.imgur.com/gtERKMq.png

https://i.imgur.com/CIh9UUU.png

https://i.imgur.com/wYlqdEk.png

https://i.imgur.com/fyAJLyM.png

https://i.imgur.com/d2uddyk.png

https://i.imgur.com/HsObcnX.png

https://i.imgur.com/D1dNjSY.png

https://i.imgur.com/Pv6mVvK.png

https://i.imgur.com/nwMUa1o.png

https://i.imgur.com/4kEg913.png

J.OT13
Jun 5, 2021, 7:12 AM
Colour!? Not RLA!? Has the world gone mad!!!!???

Proposed total of 271 units, so parking ratio is not completely off. Good to see more bike parking than car parking (though again, should be 2:1 for bike parking).

Overall, good proposal. OCH is on a roll. We need to keep this up.

YOWetal
Jun 5, 2021, 7:28 AM
Colour!? Not RLA!? Has the world gone mad!!!!???

Proposed total of 271 units, so parking ratio is not completely off. Good to see more bike parking than car parking (though again, should be 2:1 for bike parking).

Overall, good proposal. OCH is on a roll. We need to keep this up.

I don’t think the bike parking ratio matters so much. You can put a bike in your unit.

I’m not sure if we are working to eliminate cars why people who can’t afford to pay for their own housing are getting any parking spots. I know there are cheap vehicles and people with far flung jobs and enough kids to make them eligible but given how many working poor have to schlep on the bus from their distant rental apartments it always is surprising to see some very nice cars parked in community housing.

khabibulin
Jun 5, 2021, 1:13 PM
I don’t think the bike parking ratio matters so much. You can put a bike in your unit.

I’m not sure if we are working to eliminate cars why people who can’t afford to pay for their own housing are getting any parking spots. I know there are cheap vehicles and people with far flung jobs and enough kids to make them eligible but given how many working poor have to schlep on the bus from their distant rental apartments it always is surprising to see some very nice cars parked in community housing.

Based on locations of gang activity I think it is safe to say that many of the owners of those nice cars parked in community housing have income that is "off the books".

McDonald's Racoon
Jun 5, 2021, 6:03 PM
Everyone always complains about the black and white bricks and cries out for more colours but is this really what you were looking for? Personally I feel like there's no rhyme or reason to the placement or the colours used, making the entire complex look like a childrens hospital or something... It may grow on me overtime but my initial opinion is that it looks odd.

rocketphish
Jun 5, 2021, 10:58 PM
Everyone always complains about the black and white bricks and cries out for more colours but is this really what you were looking for? Personally I feel like there's no rhyme or reason to the placement or the colours used, making the entire complex look like a childrens hospital or something... It may grow on me overtime but my initial opinion is that it looks odd.

I doubt that this is what most people want either. The seemingly random over-use of colour here is clearly an attempt to disguise the fact that these are low-budget boxes of buildings with little architectural merit. Sadly, very few architects seem to have figured out how to make a classy-looking social housing project.

J.OT13
Jun 6, 2021, 12:26 PM
Everyone always complains about the black and white bricks and cries out for more colours but is this really what you were looking for? Personally I feel like there's no rhyme or reason to the placement or the colours used, making the entire complex look like a childrens hospital or something... It may grow on me overtime but my initial opinion is that it looks odd.

They could tone it down a bit, but I'm happy with this. It's a refreshing change. Just as long as we don't see dozens all over the city.

McDonald's Racoon
Jun 7, 2021, 1:26 AM
I doubt that this is what most people want either. The seemingly random over-use of colour here is clearly an attempt to disguise the fact that these are low-budget boxes of buildings with little architectural merit. Sadly, very few architects seem to have figured out how to make a classy-looking social housing project.

I don't think it's that difficult to use colour effectively, especially in this contemporary, cost effective design style. This trend of colour blocking has been quite popular in recent years and the best looking designs seem to always have a distinct colour pallet and they keep the use of colour simple yet effective. In the design rational for the Wateridge buildings they talk about creating circles by connecting their values with those colours but that isn't present at all in the design... Anyways here are a few effective uses of colour blocking for affordable housing: https://architizer-prod.imgix.net/mediadata/projects/292012/5dd29796.jpg?fit=max&w=1680&q=60&auto=format&auto=compress&cs=striphttps://architizer-prod.imgix.net/mediadata/projects/492012/1a30990a.jpg?fit=max&w=1680&q=60&auto=format&auto=compress&cs=strip

https://architizer.com/blog/inspiration/collections/affordable-housing/

J.OT13
Jun 24, 2021, 6:32 PM
Fleury Twitter thread.

#ArrivProperties, the development brand of
@OCH_LCO
having its first public meeting for #Mikinak in #WateridgeVilage - rental, mix-uses, green and affordable buildings.

#PropriétésArriv, le bras pour les nouveaux développements d'
@OCH_LCO
de #Mikinak au Village des riverains.

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E4hrmtJXwAApozx?format=jpg&name=small

Glad to join colleague and board member
@rawlsonking
for tonight's consultation.

Des propriétés locatives, abordables, durables et à usages variés,

Un plaisir de me joindre à mon collègue et membre du conseil d'administration d'LCO - Rawlson.

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E4hsGL1X0AIL6CH?format=jpg&name=small

3 buildings, over 270 mixed size and mixed income units.

3 bâtiments avec plus de 270 unités ayant une grandeur variées et qui ciblent un éventail de niveau de revenu

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E4hsWpcX0AoHN7p?format=jpg&name=small

Centrally located within #WateridgeVillage

Au coeur du Village des riverains

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E4hsYmxXEAI2tjD?format=jpg&name=small

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E4hsbj1XMAQSk3S?format=jpg&name=small

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E4hsgHbXIAQMf5F?format=jpg&name=small

https://twitter.com/MathieuFleury/status/1407495060275568647

drizzo_613
Jun 30, 2021, 7:32 PM
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51270121972_4f9ce08237_b.jpg

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51271894220_0450d470d9_b.jpg

McDonald's Racoon
Jul 2, 2021, 9:15 PM
Ouf, looks dreary....

Admiral Nelson
Jul 13, 2021, 11:25 PM
Ouf, looks dreary....

Wait 5 years and the trees will add a nice green canopy.

Harley613
Jul 14, 2021, 12:02 AM
Ouf, looks dreary....

It looks especially dreary compared to the rather funky similar format buildings going up all over the Plateau.

rocketphish
Aug 26, 2021, 2:25 AM
Updated renderings for 715 Mikinak Road. Goodbye primary colours... hello tertiary colours. Still looks like a children's hospital.

https://i.imgur.com/AmBN4RO.png

https://i.imgur.com/uiVN5MG.png

https://i.imgur.com/clAHiEt.png

https://i.imgur.com/Q59IJcK.png

https://i.imgur.com/cOJl8LV.png

http://webcast.ottawa.ca/plan/All_Image%20Referencing_Site%20Plan%20Application_Image%20Reference_2021-08-24%20-%20Architectural%20Package%20-%20D07-12-21-0068.PDF

OTownandDown
Aug 26, 2021, 3:18 PM
Good on them for going all-out with the colours. I hate half-way, single panels of colour (red panels at Claridge on Nepean that look like the building is injured...). Why not just coat the thing in wild shades. .

What we don't see enough of in Canada is gradient colour. Why do we have to go with a mish-mash?


https://c8.alamy.com/comp/2AHAC4M/11052018-berlin-berlin-germany-panel-building-with-colour-gradient-on-the-facade-in-the-auersbergstrasse-in-berlin-marzahn-00p180511d294caroex-2AHAC4M.jpghttps://c8.alamy.com/comp/2AHAC4M/11052018-berlin-berlin-germany-panel-building-with-colour-gradient-on-the-facade-in-the-auersbergstrasse-in-berlin-marzahn-00p180511d294caroex-2AHAC4M.jpg

Updated renderings for 715 Mikinak Road. Goodbye primary colours... hello tertiary colours. Still looks like a children's hospital.

OTSkyline
Aug 27, 2021, 1:56 PM
GOD that is ugly. Thank god it's in a forgettable area where it will most likely be out-of-sight, out-of-mind.

Agreed, it looks like a children's hospital or some type of homeless shelter / housing which tend to go overboard with colour or designs like this to try and scream "Guys this is a happy place! This is not depressing at all! Happy Happy Happy here!" :yuck:

McDonald's Racoon
Aug 27, 2021, 7:03 PM
All children's hospital jokes aside, it's an improvement. The transitions are well done and look planned, I'd remove the floating colour panels and leave certain areas white so that the sides with the colour stand out.

movebyleap
Aug 29, 2021, 6:45 PM
Wow! I am LOVING the colours!! Enough of the greige!!!

I did love the primary colours but the slightly altered ones are still passable. My only fear is that, this being Ottawa, the final product will actually turn out to be 50 shades of beige!

lrt's friend
Aug 29, 2021, 7:14 PM
Got to fit in with grey of Ottawa's long winters.

kwoldtimer
Aug 29, 2021, 8:23 PM
Got to fit in with grey of Ottawa's long winters.

Bright colours in winter can look like a bloody gash ...

rocketphish
Nov 25, 2021, 1:03 AM
I thought I'd check out Mattamy's 360 Condos in Wateridge this week and see if there's a crane up yet. There isn't, but it can't be far off.

https://i.imgur.com/CFSw8Yu.png

https://i.imgur.com/gK5JbdH.png

November 2021
Photos by me

J.OT13
Jan 28, 2022, 2:11 PM
Short video discussing the OCH project at 715 Mikinak.

BUC1yyMaT4M

kwoldtimer
Jan 28, 2022, 2:58 PM
Any sign of progress on the mixed-use condo buildings to the west of this project?

rocketphish
Feb 10, 2022, 11:01 PM
Any sign of progress on the mixed-use condo buildings to the west of this project?

Yes. I went by earlier this week, and they are still working on the parking garage for the first of the four buildings.

https://i.imgur.com/EVC6Gq2.png

rocketphish
Feb 10, 2022, 11:07 PM
Also, Mattamy has picked-up yet another block of land in Wateridge Village where they intend to build a low-rise residential planned unit development consisting of 176 units in 9 4-storey back-to-back stacked dwellings.

The elevations resemble the stacked townhomes that Mattamy built at the other end of Wateridge.

Development application:
https://devapps.ottawa.ca/en/applications/D07-12-21-0231/details

https://i.imgur.com/7avVA1H.png

https://i.imgur.com/r55R5aW.png

https://i.imgur.com/AVZxuXe.png

GeoNerd
Feb 10, 2022, 11:14 PM
Also, Mattamy has picked-up yet another block of land in Wateridge Village where they intend to build a low-rise residential planned unit development consisting of 176 4-storey back-to-back stacked dwellings.

The elevations resemble the stacked townhomes that Mattamy built at the other end of Wateridge.

Development application:
https://devapps.ottawa.ca/en/applications/D07-12-21-0231/details



Woof! What in the Barrhaven is that?? So much surface parking. Also the subject site doesn't match the land use map. They must be changing the road network somehow.