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rocketphish
Jan 28, 2020, 12:33 AM
It looks like it should be, but is the pricing known yet?

Oh yes, the pricing has been available for quite a while now:
https://mattamyhomes.com/ottawa/communities/wateridge-360-condos-by-mattamy.aspx

rocketphish
Jan 28, 2020, 12:41 AM
Mattamy can do better... their Bower Condos in Oakville are similar in scale, but far more pleasing to look at.

https://mattamyhomes.com/gta/closedcommunities/oakville-bower-condos-on-the-preserve.aspx

Marcus CLS
Feb 12, 2020, 1:08 PM
Ignore wrong thread

rocketphish
Mar 27, 2020, 10:17 PM
It looks like Uniform Urban Developments has picked up a few more blocks in Wateridge. "We are presently sold out at Wateridge Village, but Future Phases are COMING SOON in 2020 including towns, semis, and singles!".

https://i.imgur.com/kvNrzNH.png

https://uniformdevelopments.com/new-homes/wateridge-village-at-rockcliffe/#

rocketphish
Jun 14, 2020, 3:12 AM
Mattamy' 360 Condos have undergone some changes. Updated exterior designs, increased unit count (up from 357 to 421) and vastly reduced ground floor commercial spaces (down from 2088m2 to 786m2).

https://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__A2P3D2


Siteplan:

https://i.imgur.com/n2BkSNP.png


Renderings:

https://i.imgur.com/2N2ReW1.png

https://i.imgur.com/QTxMJ8n.png

https://i.imgur.com/CE4J9Z9.png

kwoldtimer
Jun 14, 2020, 1:51 PM
Condos?

rocketphish
Jun 14, 2020, 4:36 PM
Condos?

Yes. https://mattamyhomes.com/ottawa/communities/wateridge-360-condos-by-mattamy

Glenlivet Ave
Jun 15, 2020, 11:15 AM
I drove through this neighbourhood yesterday to get a sense of what's been built so far and it didn't feel urban to me. More like an extremely dense version of suburbia without direct access to retail and services you get in an urban setting.

I understand that it's in it's early phases still so I'll reserve judgement but the contrast between this neighbourhood and the adjacent Rothwell Heights or Manor Park are stark.

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 12:00 PM
I drove through this neighbourhood yesterday to get a sense of what's been built so far and it didn't feel urban to me. More like an extremely dense version of suburbia without direct access to retail and services you get in an urban setting.

I understand that it's in it's early phases still so I'll reserve judgement but the contrast between this neighbourhood and the adjacent Rothwell Heights or Manor Park are stark.

To be fair, none of the mixed-use or employment areas have yet been built, although I'm sceptical of how much commercial/retail the area will be able to support. It does seem to me to be destined to be very self-contained rather than any sort of "destination".

bradnixon
Jun 15, 2020, 12:23 PM
I drove through this neighbourhood yesterday to get a sense of what's been built so far and it didn't feel urban to me. More like an extremely dense version of suburbia without direct access to retail and services you get in an urban setting.

I understand that it's in it's early phases still so I'll reserve judgement but the contrast between this neighbourhood and the adjacent Rothwell Heights or Manor Park are stark.

Isn’t something like the Glebe also basically a “dense version of suburbia”? In fact it was a suburb when first built.

Retail in a brand new neighborhood is tough- it’s a chicken and the egg thing. There needs to be residents to support it, but for early residents, there is no existing retail to attract them.

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 12:36 PM
Isn’t something like the Glebe also basically a “dense version of suburbia”? In fact it was a suburb when first built.

Retail in a brand new neighborhood is tough- it’s a chicken and the egg thing. There needs to be residents to support it, but for early residents, there is no existing retail to attract them.

I am suddenly reminded of the look of pure horror I got many years ago from a very proud new homeowner in the Glebe when I casually referred to the Glebe as "the suburbs" (Ottawa for me at the time was Centretown and Lowertown, full stop.). :haha:

OTownandDown
Jun 15, 2020, 3:03 PM
I drove through this neighbourhood yesterday to get a sense of what's been built so far and it didn't feel urban to me. More like an extremely dense version of suburbia without direct access to retail and services you get in an urban setting.

I understand that it's in it's early phases still so I'll reserve judgement but the contrast between this neighbourhood and the adjacent Rothwell Heights or Manor Park are stark.

You mean to tell me that when the developers marketed this area as a new village within a City with several shoehorned-in townhomes, that it was not feasible to have a fully fleshed out commercial district that was self supporting and that outsiders would want to visit?? I'm SHOCKED I tell you. SHOCKED.

Edit: Ok I'll give some credit for splitting this area into developable areas and letting different developers put their spin on it, and for going with a commercial mix in some areas. Its better than the 1960's megablocks we're still correcting elsewhere.

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 4:10 PM
I've forgotten, what is the population of the area expected to be, once it's fully built out?

phil235
Jun 15, 2020, 5:01 PM
I am suddenly reminded of the look of pure horror I got many years ago from a very proud new homeowner in the Glebe when I casually referred to the Glebe as "the suburbs" (Ottawa for me at the time was Centretown and Lowertown, full stop.). :haha:

The Glebe was definitely a suburb back in the day.

To be fair, there is a pretty big difference between a streetcar suburb from the turn of the century and what we normally call suburbia.

Uhuniau
Jun 15, 2020, 6:52 PM
Edit: Ok I'll give some credit for splitting this area into developable areas and letting different developers put their spin on it, and for going with a commercial mix in some areas. Its better than the 1960's megablocks we're still correcting elsewhere.

Where are we correcting any of our 60s mistakes?

Uhuniau
Jun 15, 2020, 6:53 PM
Isn’t something like the Glebe also basically a “dense version of suburbia”? In fact it was a suburb when first built.

The term "suburb" has developed such a different connotation in the past 70 years, that I'd be wary of comparing its use now to its use when "suburbs" like the Glebe developed.

Postmaster
Jun 15, 2020, 7:38 PM
Nothing but functional. Ottawa Style. They should leave a few acres of tree stumps to represent our architectural diversity in this city.

Multi-modal
Jun 15, 2020, 8:28 PM
It does seem to me to be destined to be very self-contained rather than any sort of "destination".

This development was always destined to be pretty isolated. They did geography and surrounding development basically limited them to 3 access points. And the low-density residential to the south really creates a barrier to walk to the existing Montreal Road "arterial mainstreet".

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 8:40 PM
The Glebe was definitely a suburb back in the day.

To be fair, there is a pretty big difference between a streetcar suburb from the turn of the century and what we normally call suburbia.

Indeed, although not in the late 1980s, when I made the comment (innocently, I swear!).

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 8:43 PM
This development was always destined to be pretty isolated. They did geography and surrounding development basically limited them to 3 access points. And the low-density residential to the south really creates a barrier to walk to the existing Montreal Road "arterial mainstreet".

I keep forgetting - is it the plan to eventually restore Hemlock as an access point?

rocketphish
Jun 15, 2020, 9:28 PM
I've forgotten, what is the population of the area expected to be, once it's fully built out?

10,000 to 15,000, according to most articles I've seen, going all the way back to the beginning:
http://www.skyscraperpage.com/forum/showpost.php?p=3194419&postcount=3

rocketphish
Jun 15, 2020, 9:28 PM
I keep forgetting - is it the plan to eventually restore Hemlock as an access point?

Yes, the most recent maps still show Hemlock as an access point:
http://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showpost.php?p=8386509&postcount=578

lrt's friend
Jun 15, 2020, 10:36 PM
Do we never learn?

All there needs to be is a square with a park in the middle with benches etc, and retail and services on the outside of the square, right in the centre of the community. Surely 10,000 to 15,000 could support a grocery store, drug store, a few restaurants (with outdoor patios), a community centre, a hairdresser, maybe a few professional offices. Make it pedestrian and bike oriented as possible to make it a pleasant place to visit without the need of a car and massive parking lots.

kwoldtimer
Jun 15, 2020, 11:28 PM
Do we never learn?

All there needs to be is a square with a park in the middle with benches etc, and retail and services on the outside of the square, right in the centre of the community. Surely 10,000 to 15,000 could support a grocery store, drug store, a few restaurants (with outdoor patios), a community centre, a hairdresser, maybe a few professional offices. Make it pedestrian and bike oriented as possible to make it a pleasant place to visit without the need of a car and massive parking lots.

There is a rather nice park/playground/plaza already in place immediately to the west of the latest proposed mixed use project, and another small plaza is planned kitty corner to it, again in the mixed use area (I'm assuming this is the planned "town square"). Although the commercial space planned for the new project is limited (under 800sq metres), it is adjacent to those park areas. I assume that there will be a community centre, but I don't know where it will be located (co-located with one of the schools, perhaps?).

Multi-modal
Jun 15, 2020, 11:46 PM
I keep forgetting - is it the plan to eventually restore Hemlock as an access point?

Yes, I believe so. It appears to be part of Phase 2:http://www.wateridge.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Wateridge-Village-Phasing-Plan-Jan-4-2018.pdf