HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2007, 11:04 PM
LostInTheZone's Avatar
LostInTheZone LostInTheZone is offline
Do you like... Huey Lewis
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Phila.
Posts: 3,062
Bauhaus!

I'm a big fan of 30s-40s bauhaus-style cantelevered windows. I like the proportions of the window frames. The attention to detail and proportion is what distinguishes early high modernism from the later, streetscape-destroying garbage it enabled.

Sasso pics from Germantown:





The always-classic PSFS building- built in 1932. Is this the only bauhaus skyscraper?







original Cartier clock:



33rd floor penthouse- jaw-droppingly gorgeous:







more pics on phillyskyline.
__________________
"I'm exceedingly pro-growth, but I have to respectfully dissagree. Growth is not the holy grail, smart growth is. Uncontrolled, careless growth which ends up creating problems in the long run is called cancer." -Eigenwelt

Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2007, 11:17 PM
LostInTheZone's Avatar
LostInTheZone LostInTheZone is offline
Do you like... Huey Lewis
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Phila.
Posts: 3,062
Girard Estate garage:



Charles Cushman said of this place in 1952: "The very last word in San Francisco dwellings. Washington at Maple [3800 West]."



__________________
"I'm exceedingly pro-growth, but I have to respectfully dissagree. Growth is not the holy grail, smart growth is. Uncontrolled, careless growth which ends up creating problems in the long run is called cancer." -Eigenwelt

Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2007, 11:54 PM
Evergrey's Avatar
Evergrey Evergrey is offline
Eurosceptic
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 24,339
that PSFS penthouse just screams urban chic!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 12:08 AM
BTinSF BTinSF is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: San Francisco & Tucson
Posts: 24,088
Compare this:



to this:

San Francisco's Moscone West Convention Center (building in the right foreground)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 12:22 AM
BTinSF BTinSF is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: San Francisco & Tucson
Posts: 24,088
I'm not too clear on what makes something definitively bauhaus, but how about these San Francisco buildings:



Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 12:28 AM
LostInTheZone's Avatar
LostInTheZone LostInTheZone is offline
Do you like... Huey Lewis
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Phila.
Posts: 3,062
that first one I'd call more International Style, but I don't know what the distinction is either. I'd say that anything built after ~1950 doesn't count.
__________________
"I'm exceedingly pro-growth, but I have to respectfully dissagree. Growth is not the holy grail, smart growth is. Uncontrolled, careless growth which ends up creating problems in the long run is called cancer." -Eigenwelt

Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 12:39 AM
LostInTheZone's Avatar
LostInTheZone LostInTheZone is offline
Do you like... Huey Lewis
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Phila.
Posts: 3,062
Starrett-Lehigh building, 1931: This might not be bauhaus per se, but it's certainly built on bauhaus principles. I'm hesitant to call it deco because there's almost no decoration.

ARCHITECTS: this is what is meant by ribbon windows. If your structural columns are stuck against the glass, you're doing something wrong:

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/CHE/...20Building.htm











http://www.lightningfield.com/2006_01.html





__________________
"I'm exceedingly pro-growth, but I have to respectfully dissagree. Growth is not the holy grail, smart growth is. Uncontrolled, careless growth which ends up creating problems in the long run is called cancer." -Eigenwelt

Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.

Last edited by LostInTheZone; Mar 9, 2007 at 1:30 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 12:44 AM
seaskyfan seaskyfan is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,751
I've always heard the PSFS Building referred to as the first International Style skyscraper in the US. My understanding is that the Bauhaus begat the International Style.

Thanks for posting, that's one of my favorite Philly buildings and my favorite built in the last 100 years.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 1:13 AM
LostInTheZone's Avatar
LostInTheZone LostInTheZone is offline
Do you like... Huey Lewis
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Phila.
Posts: 3,062
These are from the Art Deco! thread. Bauhaus or deco?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LostInTheZone View Post
The streamlined moderne 1360 Montgomery Street, San Francisco:

I noticed this building last month when I was going up Telegraph Hill. I just came across the name of it now, looking for info on how high the hill was. The murals are silvery foil against white stucco:





See the view of the Bay Bridge, mirroring the mural?

The apartments were built in '38-'39, at a time when the Hill was changing from a difficult-to-reach working-class enclave to a place appreciated by wealthier people who moved there for the views. The murals celebrate the newly opened Bay Bridge, as well as reflecting the areas's character and the 1930s preoccupation with workers and socialist themes in art.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Pacho View Post


__________________
"I'm exceedingly pro-growth, but I have to respectfully dissagree. Growth is not the holy grail, smart growth is. Uncontrolled, careless growth which ends up creating problems in the long run is called cancer." -Eigenwelt

Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 3:38 AM
Arriviste's Avatar
Arriviste Arriviste is offline
What we play is life.
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Calgary, Canada
Posts: 1,524
Um, there are a few glaring errors on this page. Not much of it is true Bauhaus, for the Bauhaus was a small faction that only produced for a very brief pre-war period. Most of what is being shown is Art Moderne, or Deco. There are some really nice examples thought hat Ig uess could fallunder the larger umbrella of Bauhaus influence.
Personally I think that with a small group of exceptions such as Gropius' own residence in Mass. that the BH is limited to Germany. It kind of translates into the Int'l style once it leaves Germany.
Heres Walters pad:


__________________
I shut my eyes in order to see.

Last edited by Arriviste; Mar 9, 2007 at 3:43 AM. Reason: Good lord that pic was huge.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 3:43 AM
Arriviste's Avatar
Arriviste Arriviste is offline
What we play is life.
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Calgary, Canada
Posts: 1,524
And the Bauhaus itself:


Revolutionary for many reasons, one of which being it was one of the first buildings to actively engage the the street (in a time when cars were still somewhat rare). The structure spans the road leading to it, which was revolutionary for the time.
__________________
I shut my eyes in order to see.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 3:47 AM
LSyd's Avatar
LSyd LSyd is offline
Red October standing by
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Columbia/Sumter, SC
Posts: 16,854
there seems to be a fine line b/w some bauhaus, international, deco and moderne buildings, especially the shorter the building. eh, i'll post some examples later.

-
__________________
"The vapors! The fainting couch! Those heartless elitists are burning down the plantation with their logic and arithmetic!"

-fflint
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 3:55 AM
seaskyfan seaskyfan is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arriviste View Post
Um, there are a few glaring errors on this page. Not much of it is true Bauhaus, for the Bauhaus was a small faction that only produced for a very brief pre-war period. Most of what is being shown is Art Moderne, or Deco. There are some really nice examples thought hat Ig uess could fallunder the larger umbrella of Bauhaus influence.
Personally I think that with a small group of exceptions such as Gropius' own residence in Mass. that the BH is limited to Germany. It kind of translates into the Int'l style once it leaves Germany.
Heres Walters pad:


The Gropius House is open to the public and worth a visit if you're in the Boston area (hours vary - call ahead). Aside from the Bauhaus influence Gropius also incorporated a lot of vernacular New England elements.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 4:24 AM
B4burgh's Avatar
B4burgh B4burgh is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 30
If your looking for Bahaus go to Tel Aviv. According to Wikipedia over 4,000 of the buildings are either Bahaus or early International. Recently it was made a Unesco World Heritage Site.

http://www.holidayinisrael.com

[/IMG]


[/IMG]

http://www.telecom-israel.com/travel.../whitecity.jpg

[/IMG]
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 4:34 AM
LostInTheZone's Avatar
LostInTheZone LostInTheZone is offline
Do you like... Huey Lewis
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Phila.
Posts: 3,062
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arriviste View Post
Um, there are a few glaring errors on this page. Not much of it is true Bauhaus, for the Bauhaus was a small faction that only produced for a very brief pre-war period. Most of what is being shown is Art Moderne, or Deco. There are some really nice examples thought hat Ig uess could fallunder the larger umbrella of Bauhaus influence.
Personally I think that with a small group of exceptions such as Gropius' own residence in Mass. that the BH is limited to Germany. It kind of translates into the Int'l style once it leaves Germany.
see, I feel that architects are to dogmatic in adhering to a cannon of what is considered "bauhaus", which leads to us always seeing the same set of examples from the high priests. With this thread, I wanted people to share more common examples. To me these buildings operate under the functionalist principles of the movement, and still have solid walls.

To me, "International Style" brings to mind the glass and steel, greater emphasis on pure forms and rationalism that came after 1950 or so, vs the more solid, eccentric geometries of earlier the earlier 1930s buildings.
__________________
"I'm exceedingly pro-growth, but I have to respectfully dissagree. Growth is not the holy grail, smart growth is. Uncontrolled, careless growth which ends up creating problems in the long run is called cancer." -Eigenwelt

Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 4:39 AM
Arriviste's Avatar
Arriviste Arriviste is offline
What we play is life.
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Calgary, Canada
Posts: 1,524
Quote:
Originally Posted by LostInTheZone View Post
Starrett-Lehigh building, 1931: This might not be bauhaus per se, but it's certainly built on bauhaus principles. I'm hesitant to call it deco because there's almost no decoration.

ARCHITECTS: this is what is meant by ribbon windows. If your structural columns are stuck against the glass, you're doing something wrong:

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/CHE/...20Building.htm











http://www.lightningfield.com/2006_01.html





Such a great post. One of my top 10 fav's all time.
__________________
I shut my eyes in order to see.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 4:41 AM
LostInTheZone's Avatar
LostInTheZone LostInTheZone is offline
Do you like... Huey Lewis
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Phila.
Posts: 3,062
__________________
"I'm exceedingly pro-growth, but I have to respectfully dissagree. Growth is not the holy grail, smart growth is. Uncontrolled, careless growth which ends up creating problems in the long run is called cancer." -Eigenwelt

Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 4:55 AM
LostInTheZone's Avatar
LostInTheZone LostInTheZone is offline
Do you like... Huey Lewis
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Phila.
Posts: 3,062
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arriviste View Post
And the Bauhaus itself: The structure spans the road leading to it, which was revolutionary for the time.
see, as you might gather, I have a genuine appreciation for good modern architecture. The movement produced some truly great buildings and had a lot of ideas that were worth adding to the architectural vocabulary. The thing is though, statements like this are infuriating to people who don't like modernism, and the modernist crowd tends to think a bit too highly of itself a little too often.

__________________
"I'm exceedingly pro-growth, but I have to respectfully dissagree. Growth is not the holy grail, smart growth is. Uncontrolled, careless growth which ends up creating problems in the long run is called cancer." -Eigenwelt

Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 5:04 AM
STERNyc's Avatar
STERNyc STERNyc is offline
Landmark Restored
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 1,407
NYC's best example of Bauhaus architecture is a building in Hunter College designed by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, the same architects as the Empire State Building in 1940.

Unfortunately this is the best picture I could find of it, online:

__________________
Somewhere between Child's clarity and Libeskind's dazzle lies the future.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 5:15 AM
Arriviste's Avatar
Arriviste Arriviste is offline
What we play is life.
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Calgary, Canada
Posts: 1,524
Quote:
Originally Posted by LostInTheZone View Post
see, as you might gather, I have a genuine appreciation for good modern architecture. The movement produced some truly great buildings and had a lot of ideas that were worth adding to the architectural vocabulary. The thing is though, statements like this are infuriating to people who don't like modernism, and the modernist crowd tends to think a bit too highly of itself a little too often.

Touche. This modernist can admit to being wrong technically, but I guess I was referring more specifically to the Bauhaus as being the first to consider the emerging car culture, and react to it. But yes, I guess there have been MANY buildings that have spanned a road, but they were originally not spanning roads per se... and our argument spirals into a semantic game after this. We could argue it to death. I totally see your point, and agree that Modernism does come with a certain intrinsic "confidence" for better or more likely worse.
__________________
I shut my eyes in order to see.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 7:42 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.