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  #54941  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:57 PM
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odinthor odinthor is offline
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That book is simply (and no doubt inadvertantly) wrong, I'm sure. Here's the beginning of my own notes on Spring St., gathered from various sources over the years. It was probably only playfully called "Danger St." due to what's detailed in the latter part of this:

"Spring Street, the sometime “Calle Primavera” said to have been named by surveyor Ord for his beloved Maria de la Trinidad Serafina Ortega (married name de la Guerra), whom he referred to as his “Springtime” (“Primavera”); before realignment in the 1920s, it followed a diagonal running between close to its 1st St. corner and the intersection of Temple St./Main St., which was the path of the original Native American trail skirting the hills; 1846, the residence of Narciso Botello was on this street; January 2, 1858, published (Los Angeles Star): “Owing to inattention to the state of the sewerage, a row of houses on Spring street were inundated by the flood, causing considerable annoyance but no serious damage”; January 16, 1858, published (Los Angeles Star): “On Wednesday we were visited by a very heavy rain, which lasted for several hours. It fell in torrents, causing a flood in our streets, and almost inundating a row of buildings on the west side of Spring street, creating no little consternation among the inhabitants. This is a most unfortunate block of buildings, as the water from the adjacent hills flows down on them, and keeps the inmates on the look-out during each heavy rain."

Edit add: It might be worth adding that it wasn’t until the 1840s that the city began to look into the interesting question of giving the streets names--not naming streets was not unusual in California; Davis mentions that neither did San Francisco’s streets have any names in the mid-1840s (William Heath Davis, Seventy-Five Years in California, p. 115).

Last edited by odinthor; Yesterday at 11:07 PM. Reason: Add pertinent data.
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  #54942  
Old Posted Today, 3:25 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
Stream of consciousness...It's an intriguing photo because there's so little in the way of clues. All the readable store signs are pretty generic, Discount Drugs, Cutrate, Sells for Less. There are no other people in the photograph on the street. The bicycle on the left has a lot of things hanging from it. The boy seems more contemporary than usually seen in a 40's photograph, maybe it's that hat. Or the collared polo-type shirt? The car one can see in the reflection in the store windows looks modern to my eyes, but it's a reflection. At the end of the street, is that a truck in the road? Is that white line in the picture a crease in it? What's on the crate by the boy's feet? At the end of the walk it looks like a pole in the middle of the sidewalk? I'm assuming the Miss Liberty Dolls advertised are paper dolls? Why is someone from Cambridge Springs, PA, selling this photograph and where did it come from?
Interesting to hear your different ideas and questions, Martin_Pal


Here is a newstand photograph, with a glimpse of a newsboy, that we may (or may not) have seen on NLA.....The photograph was taken by Ida Wyman in 1950.


Monroe Gallery of Photography

....................................................................................................... Does anyone have that issue of Life Magazine?



. . .did most newstands in L. A. have a liquor license back then?...(I see bottles)

The pages tacked up at the left are. . .(I used to know). . .racing forms? ...(but weren't they illegal?)
.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Today at 3:38 AM.
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  #54943  
Old Posted Today, 3:59 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Here is another Ida Wyman photograph.....I find this one especially interesting.

"A man selects a song on the jukebox at the Vera Cruz Cafe in Los Angeles, 1950."


Monroe Gallery of Photography



So was the Vera Cruz Cafe in the Vera Cruz Hotel?


1942 Directory / LAPL








Just for fun. Here's a closer look.


Ida Wyman, 1950

.
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  #54944  
Old Posted Today, 6:23 AM
Lorendoc Lorendoc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
.

Here is another Ida Wyman photograph.....I find this one especially interesting.

"A man selects a song on the jukebox at the Vera Cruz Cafe in Los Angeles, 1950."


Monroe Gallery of Photography





So was the Vera Cruz Cafe in the Vera Cruz Hotel?


1942 Directory / LAPL
416 N. Main is the address of the Masonic Lodge Building next to the Pico House. Michael Ryerson made a post about the Vera Cruz Cafe 7 years ago, but the link is gone :[
Someone posted his image on Pinterest, though, so here it is:




But, wait, there's more:

News-Pilot 6/29/57 via newspapers.com

Since this was a San Pedro newspaper, the address of the cafe in the ad would be there, not DtLA

Here's a Sanborn:

lapl.org

A block from the waterfront, a rough neighborhood dive one would imagine...

Last edited by Lorendoc; Today at 7:49 AM.
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  #54945  
Old Posted Today, 7:36 AM
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This undated photo shows the Vera Cruz Cafe on N Spring. The "El Nuevo Ver[a Cruz] Cafe" window text seems to match the image above.

"View of Macy and Spring Streets. The Vera Cruz Cafe and a Chop Suey restaurant are at right across Spring Street. In the background is the Terminal Annex Post Office.".



LAPL

(Sorry, I had to hotlink the image because Photobucket won't display my upload!)
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  #54946  
Old Posted Today, 9:52 AM
Noir_Noir Noir_Noir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post


Here is a newstand photograph, with a glimpse of a newsboy, that we may (or may not) have seen on NLA.....The photograph was taken by Ida Wyman in 1950.


Monroe Gallery of Photography

....................................................................................................... Does anyone have that issue of Life Magazine?

The picture must have been taken in 1949 and not 1950 as labeled.


This is the edition of Life (July 11th 1949) that card was promoting.



Google Books - Life, 11 July 1949


It has an eight page spread "City Against Auto" on Los Angeles' traffic problems - starts on page 78.



The edition of The Ring magazine on the stand is also from July 1949.



boxrec.com

Last edited by Noir_Noir; Today at 10:28 AM.
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  #54947  
Old Posted Today, 1:41 PM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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The Alger Hiss trial ended with a hung jury on July 7, 1949.

Cheers,

Earl
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  #54948  
Old Posted Today, 6:49 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is online now
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A lot of the magazine names in that photo seem awfully generic, but I guess you knew what you were getting! I'm getting an "Eyeful".

I had to look up what that magazine was: EYEFUL. Here's the edition on the news stand in that photograph:

It's the August 1949, "Women Are Wacky" edition. (It was published every other month.)

KokoJim

If I collected a huge stack of them I'd have an Eyeful Tower .
_____________

If one is curious about what's in an edition of EYEFUL Magazine, this link HERE will take you through the April 1949 edition page by page. My favorite was Bubble Gum Baby in which "we have a model entertaining herself with the 'latest fad' – chewing gum. And she blows a bubble so big, that when it pops, it blows all her clothes off. Yep. That happens."

Right before the back cover there is an ad that has a height/weight chart for men and women, your height and what you should weigh. (Each height should exactly weigh the same thing?) I'm guessing it might be different today than the one in 1949? There's also a reader comment section and photos submitted by readers, too.

Last edited by Martin Pal; Today at 7:21 PM.
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  #54949  
Old Posted Today, 7:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Scott Charles View Post

It was always my understanding that the street formerly known as Charity Street was our modern-day Grand Avenue.

However, the linked book gives that legacy to two different streets - Grand and Spring:





Is the second paragraph simply in error? My understanding is that Spring Street used to be called Beware (or Lookout) Street....
USC has two Ord maps dated August 29, 1849. The first has the streets labeled in English, with Charity Street between Hope and Olive. The second is labeled in English and Spanish, so it has Charity Street between Hope and Olive and Calle de Caridad between Calle de las Esperanza and Calle Acey Zuna [sic]. I can't post new images at the moment, but you can check them out at the links.
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