HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2021, 6:55 PM
Dariusb Dariusb is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Belton, TX
Posts: 741
Shipping containers used for affordable housing in Dallas

Interesting. Has this concept had positive results in other areas of the country?
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.dal...outputType=amp
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2021, 9:35 PM
MolsonExport's Avatar
MolsonExport MolsonExport is online now
The Vomit Bag.
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Otisburgh
Posts: 35,384
I've seen a lot of containers used for housing in Germany, notably on my recent trips to Hamburg and Berlin.

Barcelona makes use of them: https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2...ontainer-homes
__________________
"If you can convince the lowest white man he's better than the best colored man, he won't notice you're picking his pocket. Hell, give him somebody to look down on, and he'll empty his pockets for you." -President Lyndon B. Johnson
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2021, 9:59 PM
The North One's Avatar
The North One The North One is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 4,732
I don't understand this, there is no way in hell shipping containers are cheaper than wood frame construction. Especially since they're heavy as fuck.
__________________
Spawn of questionable parentage!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2021, 10:23 PM
dubu's Avatar
dubu dubu is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: bend oregon
Posts: 1,369
Quote:
Originally Posted by The North One View Post
I don't understand this, there is no way in hell shipping containers are cheaper than wood frame construction. Especially since they're heavy as fuck.
they last longer then wood. china built a lot of containers and they need to be used somehow, instead of siting around taking up space.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2021, 10:31 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,094
And subway cars are repurposed in the same way.
__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2021, 12:02 AM
MonkeyRonin's Avatar
MonkeyRonin MonkeyRonin is offline
¥ ¥ ¥
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 8,162
Quote:
Originally Posted by The North One View Post
I don't understand this, there is no way in hell shipping containers are cheaper than wood frame construction. Especially since they're heavy as fuck.

Depends on the climate and what has to be done to make them livable. An 8x40 ft. container costs around $4,000-5,000, for a product that is fully framed, sheathed, and waterproofed. That's cheaper than what materials + labour would be for a comparable wood-framed structure built on site. Just add windows, electrical, and a plumbing connection and you're set.

On the other hand, if you're in a colder climate and need to add insulation you're losing valuable floor space and adding to the cost. Building complex multi-unit structures that require additional structural systems further complicate things.

So they can be cheaper, but more often than not end up being a wash compared to wood framing. The one advantage that they do still have though is that they're quick to assemble.
__________________

Last edited by MonkeyRonin; Jan 23, 2021 at 9:41 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2021, 12:18 AM
memph memph is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,574
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin View Post
Depends on the climate and what has to be done to make them livable. An 8x40 ft. container costs around $4,000-5,000, for a product that is fully framed, sheathed, and waterproofed. That's cheaper than what materials + labour would be for a comparable wood-framed structure built on site. Just add windows, electrical, and a plumbing connection and you're set.

On the other hand, if you're in a colder climate and need to add insulation you're losing valuable floor space and adding to the cost. Building complex multi-unit structures that require additional structural systems further complicate things.

So they can be cheaper, but more often than not end up being a wash compared to wood framing. The one advantage that they do still have though
Wouldn't they also heat up like a car parked in the sun in a hotter climate?

What's the sound insulation like?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2021, 12:40 AM
The North One's Avatar
The North One The North One is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 4,732
Quote:
Originally Posted by dubu View Post
they last longer then wood. china built a lot of containers and they need to be used somehow, instead of siting around taking up space.
How would they last longer than wood?? Wood frame buildings don't slowly deteriorate over time opposed to other buildings. And these container homes would need the same amount of maintenance.

Pretty sure shipping containers still have a use, since the entire world still depends on shipping and that's not about to ever change.
__________________
Spawn of questionable parentage!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2021, 2:35 AM
dubu's Avatar
dubu dubu is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: bend oregon
Posts: 1,369
Quote:
Originally Posted by The North One View Post
How would they last longer than wood?? Wood frame buildings don't slowly deteriorate over time opposed to other buildings. And these container homes would need the same amount of maintenance.

Pretty sure shipping containers still have a use, since the entire world still depends on shipping and that's not about to ever change.
you are talking about a old fashion good built wood house/ building, not the new cheep built houses/ buildings now. if you make a container building cheep then it wont last long, if you spend a lot then its like a car that is 100 years old thats been in a garage.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2021, 4:05 AM
memph memph is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,574
Quote:
Originally Posted by dubu View Post
you are talking about a old fashion good built wood house/ building, not the new cheep built houses/ buildings now. if you make a container building cheep then it wont last long, if you spend a lot then its like a car that is 100 years old thats been in a garage.
idk, I rented in a 50 year old cheaply built wood frame house for a few years. There were some issues with the plumbing and the inside could've done with a new paint job but the structure itself seemed fine.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2021, 3:49 PM
Boisebro's Avatar
Boisebro Boisebro is offline
All man. Half nuts.
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Boise, Idaho
Posts: 3,092
These things have been popping up in Boise for a couple of years now. There's a company based in Boise that builds them:

https://www.indiedwell.com


Seems like they're primarily for affordable housing:

https://www.ktvb.com/article/news/lo...7-1e684928d6e9


But the College of Idaho in Caldwell (Boise suburb) also used shipping containers to create new dorms:

https://www.ktvb.com/article/news/ed...5-1b4b2f768d11
__________________
“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.”―Mark Twain
“The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page.”―Saint Augustine
“Travel is the only thing you buy that makes you richer.”―Anonymous
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2021, 5:11 PM
dc_denizen's Avatar
dc_denizen dc_denizen is online now
Selfie-stick vendor
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: New York Suburbs
Posts: 9,073
^ those are cool
__________________
Joined the bus on the 33rd seat
By the doo-doo room with the reek replete
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2021, 9:46 PM
MonkeyRonin's Avatar
MonkeyRonin MonkeyRonin is offline
¥ ¥ ¥
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 8,162
Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
Wouldn't they also heat up like a car parked in the sun in a hotter climate?

What's the sound insulation like?

Good point, ideally anything should be insulated. Though it would theoretically be easier (and cheaper) to block sun rays than to protect from the cold.
__________________
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2021, 8:11 AM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 7,478
those will make good ovens in the dallas summers. are they trying to bake the poor? seems like opposite in cold weather too. like they would retain cold problematically. maybe it doesnt matter with good insulation? i dk.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2021, 5:45 PM
eixample eixample is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by dubu View Post
they last longer then wood. china built a lot of containers and they need to be used somehow, instead of siting around taking up space.
Isn't the answer of what to do with old containers just sell them for scrap to make usable new containers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin View Post
An 8x40 ft. container costs around $4,000-5,000, for a product that is fully framed, sheathed, and waterproofed. That's cheaper than what materials + labour would be for a comparable wood-framed structure built on site. Just add windows, electrical, and a plumbing connection and you're set.
And an HVAC system. Doing all that seems like a good deal more effort on a steel shipping container as compared to doing it before you seal up the wood framed structure? When you say $4-$5k for a shipping container, do you mean full framed with studs, insulation and drywall on the inside? I guess what I'm getting at is, it may be the structure is far cheaper, but all the modifications to make it into a home seem like they'd be far more expensive than in a purpose-built wood-framed structure of comparable size.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2021, 9:03 PM
R1070 R1070 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 390
I think the point is that they are trying to make housing for those in need and repurpose these containers to reduce an environment footprint. There are other container structures around that are insulated and have done well.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2021, 10:22 PM
muertecaza muertecaza is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,729
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrnyc View Post
those will make good ovens in the dallas summers. are they trying to bake the poor? seems like opposite in cold weather too. like they would retain cold problematically. maybe it doesnt matter with good insulation? i dk.
they must know what they're doing to insulate them because there are a number of completed and in progress container projects in Phoenix. This is the latest one that I know of:

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 12:42 AM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 7,478
^ yeah no doubt and that one is interesting!

i think these are much better for temporary uses than for housing.

this guy’s family business was shipping containers and thats basically what he sez too:

https://www.treehugger.com/does-ship...-sense-4854091
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 2:28 AM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 32,041
Quote:
Originally Posted by muertecaza View Post
they must know what they're doing to insulate them because there are a number of completed and in progress container projects in Phoenix. This is the latest one that I know of:

That looks really cool! Do you have more info?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2021, 1:31 AM
ocman ocman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Burlingame
Posts: 2,354
A few are happening in LA.

https://www.latimes.com/homeless-hou...-vignes-street


And a module hotel based on shipping containers:

https://www.latimes.com/business/sto...es-coronavirus
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 2:53 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.