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  #101  
Old Posted May 22, 2007, 1:58 AM
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Originally Posted by vid View Post
What is it with TV stations occupying crappy buildings in the boonies?

We actually have a radio station here that has it's studio located more than 20km north of the city, in a community of about 50. You really have to wonder what they're thinking when they pick those locations.
Braodcasting centres are not used to impress customers, so they pick a very cost effective location. With that said there does seem to be a trend to locate them in downtown cores, in order to increase visibility.
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  #102  
Old Posted May 22, 2007, 1:08 PM
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Also, it makes sense to be close to all the action...city hall, provincial/state legislative buildings, etc. A central location enables crews to get to a story quicker (for the most part anyway)....
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  #103  
Old Posted May 26, 2007, 2:31 PM
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Eureka! A successful business is born
University's incubator turns research-based ideas into reality

Sat May 26 2007

By Martin Cash
DEAN CLARKE had such a positive experience at the Smartpark incubator that when his company was ready to operate on its own, it continued to lease office space at the University of Manitoba research park.

The business incubator at Smartpark at the university's Fort Garry campus has a new name -- the Eureka Project -- and a new way of doing business, but the same goal -- to grow research-based ideas into self-sustaining companies.

It's now managed by Gary Brownstone, a former serial entrepreneur who provides full-time on-site management support for the new companies. Smartpark is Brownstone's employer and it runs the incubator on a modest $280,000 annual budget after a three-year agreement with a couple of third-party management groups expired at the end of last year.

Clarke's company, Apptius Computer Solutions, is the poster child for the incubator concept -- going in more than three years ago with a concept and a very small number of customers and leaving with a fully functioning business.

"It was fantastic to be able to operate out of such a great facility with boardrooms and equipment to properly show potential customers what we could do and having the affiliation with the university has been great for us," says Clarke, whose company now employs 20 people and counts Smartpark and the University of Manitoba as customers in his information technology consulting business.

There are eight companies installed, some of them carry-overs from the former incarnation of the incubator at Smartpark. There are several more young companies preparing to move in.
Click here to find out more!
The companies being incubated pay a modest $50 to $150 a month for a small office space that includes access to a full range of office equipment, including computer and high-speed Internet connection. But the real value comes from networking -- with each other and the larger university community. Companies receive mentoring services and expert feedback on everything from business-plan development, marketing, intellectual property development through to connecting with financing from angel investors and venture capital.

Alan Simms, president of Smartpark, says an incubator was always envisioned to be part of the U of M research park.

"We really think an incubator can help evolve some of the research being done in Winnipeg into stand-alone entities," says Simms.

Now that the research park includes some incubated companies that are on their own, as well as research organizations and new high-tech companies, there are even more resources the incubator start-ups can draw on to help launch their new ideas into commercial viability.

Profit Master Canada, the specialty retail information technology company, was one of the first companies to move to Smartpark. Last year, company founder and former CEO Neil Dueck sold the business to a Bell subsidiary, freeing up some of his time to help the Eureka companies.

"I think it is a very valuable experience for young companies to have the ability to share ideas and live collectively," he says. "As a group of young entrepreneurs they can feed off each other."

The trick is to find the right formula to pull that off.

Smartpark, a subsidiary of the university, is the real estate developer of the research park and owns the building that houses the 10,000-square-foot Eureka offices.
The original incubator was run by a couple of management groups that took equity positions in each of the companies that entered the program. The Eureka Project is now operated by Smartpark and becomes part of a larger community effort to develop a knowledge-based industry cluster.

"Incubators are a proven model for economic development," says Brownstone, adding there are plenty of studies that show companies that go through an incubator are far more likely to succeed.

martin.cash@freepress.mb.ca

Incubators R Us

The Eureka Project may be just starting life after taking over from a previous iteration of a business incubator at Smartpark, but it is not the only game in town.

* The National Research Council's Centre for the Commercialization of Biomedical Technology (NRC-CCBT) opened a new $11-million, 55,000-square-foot building last year that is designed to be a mammoth incubator (see below).

* Winnipeg biotech entrepreneur Albert Friesen runs Genesys Ventures Inc., an incubator that has become a veritable biotech company factory. Well-known Winnipeg drug discovery and medical device companies including Medicure Inc., Miraculins Inc., Kane Biotech and DiaMedica Inc. were all partially managed by GVI and some continue to receive its management services.
* The province through its small business development branch offers a range of business development services that compliment work at other incubators and whose sum total could be equal to an incubator.

* The YMCA has been delivering the federally sponsored Self-Employment Program for more than 10 years. It provides an intensive training program for people on employment insurance who have a viable business idea.

High End Incubator

The NRC's operation, called BCC (Business Commercialization Coaching or BizComCoaching), has four companies in place and is looking for more.

The four companies at BCC are:

* Fermion Inc. -- a novel detection system that differentiates chemical, radiological and biological materials;

* Health Media Network Inc. -- a digital health media network designed to deliver timely health information in waiting rooms of clinics, hospitals and other medical facilities;

* PrintObjects Inc. -- a video game development company designing unique software for the schools; and
* R4 Software -- a business process software company looking to double its business over the next two years.

The businesses in the Eureka Project:

By Myron Love

THE INFORMATION FORGE

Principals: David Robinson, Irvin Boschmann

Business: Data management for non-profits

Joined: More than two years ago

The Information Forge was one of the first start-ups to sign on to the Eureka Project.
"Our software program is intended to serve the non-profit sector," Robinson says. "The typical non-profit is good at delivering service, but has trouble with information systems. For a monthly fee, we look after all of the technical load. All the non-profit client needs is a computer with a web browser. They won't need any technical staff."

Robinson says The Information Forge is in transition.

"It took us a couple of years to design and build our system. Now we're into the marketing phase. We have 20 paying clients in Manitoba and a couple in Saskatchewan. We are now trying to build up our client base."

SMT RESEARCH

Principal: Gamal Mustapha

Business: Designs electronics used to monitor building structures

Joined: September

Gamal Mustapha is a University of Manitoba computer engineering grad (1994) who started his company about a year ago.

"Moisture buildup is a major issue in British Columbia where there have been problems with leaking condos," he says. Mould-related issues such as structural damage and health problems can be attributed to undetected moisture accumulation.
SMT's moisture sensor consists of a patented moisture detection tape that can be placed inside a building wall. SMT's computers keep track of moisture buildup and can automatically alert building managers to problems.

Mustapha says he is experimenting with detecting moisture in concrete and different roofing applications. He is also working with the National Research Council to develop wireless sensors to assist in advanced building research.

"I started SMT in an office in Transcona," he says. "Being part of the Eureka Project has allowed us to be near other researchers at the university and other companies that complement our research."

ANNP

Principals: Suzhen Li and Ron Marquardt

Business: Nutraceutical food additives

Joined: December.

"This is perfect for us right now," says Ron Marquardt, a retired professor of animal sciences. "It's a prestigious location. Our rent is subsidized for the first few months. We are near the Richardson Nutraceutical Centre. And we have access to the university library and other facilities."
Li came here from China in 1991 to work on her PhD. Marquardt was her professor/faculty adviser. After graduation and work for a nutrition company, Li decided she wanted to go into business for herself and wanted Marquardt as her partner.

"Since Suzhen is from China, she is aware of Chinese herbal medicine. There seemed to be some commercial opportunities there for the North American market," Marquardt says.

Isoflavins reduce symptoms of menopause, Li notes, and by replacing estrogen in post-menopausal women, reduce the incidences of breast cancer, heart disease and osteoporosis. In men, isoflavins seem to reduce the incidence of lung and prostate cancer.

"We have registered six products as supplements so far," Marquardt says. "The isoflavins also can be added to yogurts, cereal bars and orange juice.

"We think we will be able to initiate our first sales by September."

PROJECT WHITECARD

Principal: Khal Shariff

Business: Interactive educational software

Joined: Last summer.
Khal Shariff brings a varied background to his work, including theatre though the Winnipeg Shakespeare Company and Manitoba Opera, and programming at Manitoba Telecom Services, where he developed aroundmanitoba.com and the MTS online directory. He also worked as a senior developer for the CBC in Toronto.

"I have come by my skill sets naturally," he says. "I did take some courses at the University of Winnipeg to firm up my skills, especially in database application."

Shariff is developing interactive, web-based applications as well as educational games. One of his projects is Project Moonwalk, an online recreation of the Apollo moon mission. "My science adviser is Ron Creel, who was one of the NASA engineers who worked on the lunar rover."

Another is the Northern Lights Project, an interactive game that educates players about indigenous culture and stories.

Shariff is hoping to open several offices across the country. "I already have a partner in Toronto," he says.

R4 SOFTWARE

Principal: Jeff Butler

Business: Software for the remanufacturing industry
Joined: Last July

The company's main product -- R4 Binders -- automates manual business processes.

"I worked in the remanufacturing industry for a couple of years," says Jeff Butler, a chartered accountant. The company I was with asked me to build a custom system because there was nothing out there that matched their needs. After that, I decided to test the wider market on my own."

The R4 software incorporates all aspects of the client's business, including invoicing, inventory, receivables, production schedules, sales orders, sales analyses and many other functions.

"We are still adding to our software program," Butler says. "It takes time to build up a client base. People need to become confident in what we're selling before they buy our product and service."

He expects to be moving out of the incubator soon. "We have signed a contract with a major customer to install our software," Butler says. "We are going to be moving into the customer's premises to implement our program."

VANTAGE INNOVATIONS

Principal: Dean Clarke
Business: Shipping and mailing software

Joined: September

Vantage Innovations is Dean Clarke's second go-round in the Eureka Project.

Clarke was one of the first tenants and graduates of the incubator program. He moved his Apptius Computer solutions into another building in Smartpark just last April. Apptius provides IT consulting service and work flow products.

"We had originally built our shipping module for the mail-order pharmacy business when it was beginning to take off in Manitoba," Clarke says. "Now we're adapting it for use for other businesses."

He describes the new product as a shipping tool that eliminates the need for manual re-entry of address information required before shipping. It can batch labels for processing multiple orders at one time.

ISO POLAR

Principals: Barry Prentice, Henry Lasslo
Business: Promotion of airship technology

Joined: March 2005

ISO Polar's goal is to encourage the development of airship technology for sustainable transportation and logistics applications in northern latitudes.

"We are unique among start-up companies in the Eureka Project and in the Smartpark as a whole in that we are the only venture here that is not-for-profit," says Barry Prentice, who has been associated with the U of M's Transport Institute and/or transportation education for more than 20 years.

"Our purpose is to deal with regulatory issues around the use of airships as well as technology challenges such as cold-weather testing. We are trying to build a business case for the airships' use in the North."

Prentice says ISO Polar is planning to bring an airship to Manitoba this summer for a trial run delivering supplies to a remote community,

"The Eureka Project is very good for start-up companies," Prentice says. "It gives us the opportunity to grow."

KNOWLEDGEBUILDER
Principal: Roy Schellenberg

Business: Internet program that teaches English as a second language

Joined: Two years ago

Knowledgebuilder offers Internet courses to help foreign students improve English writing skills with lessons in grammar, text structure and putting sentences together.

The company was founded by Otto Toews of Vancouver, who is responsible for product development. Research and development has been ongoing since 1991.

Roy Schellenberg, a former school trustee in St. Boniface and Riel school divisions with a background in financial services, joined Knowledgebuilder six years ago, and oversees sales and marketing.

"Colleges in Western Canada and the north-central United States have tested our program and there seems to be quite a bit of interest," Schellenberg says. "A couple of colleges have started using our software. We are working with those colleges on follow-up processes."

The company's initial term in the Eureka Project ends this year. "Gary Brownstone is working with us now on developing sales and moving to the next level."
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  #104  
Old Posted May 26, 2007, 4:43 PM
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brilliant.


Encouraging innovative entrepeneuralship is a great move. In the long term some of these will prove to be growth businesses.

This type of business developement is more common on some American universities. Infact these types of university business parks are very large on some american campuses.

I think the UofW should also have a form of incubation centre in the downtown. Wouldn't it be nice to fill another building with small developing businesses?
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Last edited by newflyer; May 27, 2007 at 2:01 AM.
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  #105  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 6:46 PM
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Manitoba chiefs want cellphone revenue

Last Updated: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 | 9:41 AM CT

CBC News


Manitoba First Nations are seeking compensation from Manitoba Telecom Services for every cellphone signal that passes through First Nations land, saying the airspace should be considered a resource like land and water.

At a recent economic development summit, the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs resolved to negotiate revenue sharing with MTS for transmissions signals that cross the land, water and air space of their reserves and traditional territories.
"[The request is] based on the understanding that we do have some fundamental rights as indigenous people to land, water and airspace," said Chief Ovide Mercredi of the Grand Rapids First Nation.
"When it comes to using airspace, it's like using our water and simply because there's no precedent doesn't mean that it's not the right thing to do," he said.
Mercredi says that signals over a significant area of the province would be affected, noting that the Cree Nations claim rights to a large portion of the north.
Proposal may inspire more negotiations

Anna Hunter, a University of Saskatchewan professor of political studies specializing in aboriginal governance, says the AMC's request is unique but she says other First Nations groups across the country will likely follow suit.

"On a provincewide basis, this is definitely an innovative approach but I think it's an approach that other provinces' First Nations groups will probably take forward," she said.
MTS officials have declined to comment on the issue until they see the group's proposal.
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  #106  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 5:22 PM
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"Manitoba First Nations are seeking compensation from Manitoba Telecom Services for every cellphone signal that passes through First Nations land, saying the airspace should be considered a resource like land and water."

Normally I'm on their side, but that's just a money grab on their part. The signals aren't hurting anyone, and if they're like First Nations here, they use the cell phones too.
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  #107  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 7:50 PM
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I'm with you on that one Vid. Airspace isn't tangible, it's not a resource you can quantify like water or lumber. Do they also want compensation for the satellites passing through their "airspace"? It does appear to be somewhat of a cash grab.
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  #108  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 7:54 PM
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it probly would get tossed outa court since there was a court ruling about airspace above 50 belonging to the feds
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  #109  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 8:04 PM
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I could understand compensation for MTS towers build on native land, but signals?? why not radio stations too, then? or walkie-talkies? or CB radios?
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  #110  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 8:10 PM
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yea its stupid
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  #111  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 9:18 PM
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and i can go after mts for the signal passing though my lot in winnipeg?
it's a ridiculous suggestion

http://news.com.com/8301-10784_3-972...g=2547-1_3-0-5
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  #112  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 9:41 PM
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This reminds me of the hilarious case that went to the Supreme Court about how the Manitoba AG tried to get liqour tax that was served on air planes that fly over Manitoba. THe ruling was that air space was a Federal juristiction above a certain level. I wonder if this precident will apply.

Also, I believe it was England who auctioned off the G3 band of Airspace to providers. The economist Joesph Stiglitz also suggest that "air waves" should be sold rather than used for free.
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  #113  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 10:31 PM
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Hey if they don't want cell phone service I am sure those fequencies can be blocked, as well as radio and TV.

Talk about a completely backwards bunch of morons... maybe they'd like power and water removed as well.

How about instead of trying to screw the system at every turn, how about embracing modern technology and building something positive.
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  #114  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 11:17 PM
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(wp posted this artical on ssc)

Getting fresh, at the Fresh Cafe

By James Turner


May 31, 2007



The Watson sisters aren’t afraid to take chances in life – except when has to do with your diet, and your time.

On May 14, the three Crescentwood-area women swung open the door to Fresh Café – their independent Corydon Avenue eatery geared toward keeping people eating well.

Judging by the initial response (the restaurant took in an estimated 150 customers in its first three days), the Watson sisters, each an equal partner in the venture, are filling a demand from people willing to walk the talk when it comes to a healthy diet.

The brightly lit and cheerfully painted open-plan restaurant, near Arbuthnot St., is open for breakfast and lunch only, from 6:30 a.m, to 4 p.m. – something the sisters say residents of the neighbourhood have said they are happy about.

The seasonal menu offers a range of healthy fare ranging from unrefined steel-cut oatmeal to whole grain tabouleh salad.

A prominent (and judging by the line up of people waiting on May 15) popular feature however, is the café’s assortment of smoothies, fruit shakes and fresh juices.

It’s what fits best with Cassandra Watson’s idea to serve what she calls “healthy, whole, life-giving food” in a way that’s convenient for people.

“There’s some breakfast restaurants where you kind of feel sick for the rest of the day – there’s a lot of grease,” she said.

This is the first business venture for the trio – Cassandra, 31, Katrina, 28 and Becky, 26 – all hailing from Pine Falls, Manitoba – they have been pouring and polishing for the grand opening of their café since early February.

Cassandra Watson said she and her sisters have a combined 45 years of service experience in restaurants – it’s been a dream for each of them to run one of their own.

“We’ve gone to school…traveled here and there, but always knowing we’ve always wanted to do something along these lines,” she said.

Watson added it was her experience working 17-hour days, seven days a week in Calgary as the manager of a restaurant undergoing a $3-million renovation which proved to her she had the stomach for the challenges of opening her own one day.

“After doing that…if I’m willing to work for myself a quarter as hard as I work for someone else, I can do anything,” Watson said.

That’s not to say the renovations to what used to be a simple, yet popular coffee shop (aside from its last, short-lived incarnation as a restaurant) were easy.

But a shiny new kitchen, directed by the talents of local chef Mandel Hitzer have proven to be worth it so far.

Asked if there are long-term plans to expand the business, (the initial silence of each sister in answering gave off the distinct impression this could be their future aspiration) – the answer is for now, their focus is on getting the original Fresh Café running on all cylinders.

That doesn’t mean there’s nothing in the oven for the future.

“People are starting to really care about what they eat…there’s going to keep being a demand for it,” Katrina Watson said.

If there is any future expansion, it would likely include a bakery and grocery store, Cassandra Watson said.

In the interim, the Watsons say they have it in mind to set the Corydon Avenue café apart by more than its menu.

The trio is considering holding morning yoga classes on the restaurant’s front patio, and perhaps even holding a farmer’s market during a weekday over the summer.

As would befit an area teeming with bars and night-owl haunts, the most popular fresh juice item on the menu has been a curious mixture of ginger root, beets, lemon and cayenne pepper, dubbed the Liver Cleanse, said Cassandra Watson.
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  #115  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2007, 11:05 PM
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CIBC Capital Markets released a study ranking the 24 largest cities in Canada for economic attractiveness.

Winnipeg was suspiciously abscent, becuase they refused to release the required data. The only city choose to be omitted from the study.

This study was published in both national papers as well as many local papers across the nation, as well as released to many financial institutions. Winnipeg was either too ashamed to be published, or they just missed an amazing opportunity to promote itself.
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  #116  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2007, 1:23 AM
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Yes the taxes are high and educated youth are leaving, while there are record amounts of private investment flooding cities across the world ... but Winnipegers have proudly re-elected the NDP for another term. Lets hope another government office building to constructed so we can pretend to be in the game.
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  #117  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2007, 4:16 AM
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Saskatoon job market No. 1 in nation
Derek Abma, CanWest News Service
Published: Friday, June 01, 2007

OTTAWA -- Calgary has again emerged as the metropolitan area in Canada with the most economic momentum, according to a report by CIBC Worlds Markets.

In its semi-annual Metro Monitor, CIBC says Calgary topped the list of 24 of the most populated areas in Canada. It is the second time in a row the Alberta city has been No. 1.

Calgary was assigned a score of 33.2, which is based on indicators such as employment, housing and bankruptcy rates.

Another Alberta city benefiting from the oil boom, Edmonton, was a close second with 31.4. Among other things, Edmonton had the fastest rising residential property values in the country.

Rounding out the top five spots are Canada's three largest cities, Vancouver, Montreal and Toronto, in that order in terms of economic momentum.

Saskatchewan's two biggest cities were listed high, with Saskatoon at No. 6 and Regina at No. 7. Saskatoon was cited as having the best job market and resale-housing market in the country.

The report says that while "Vancouver did not excel in any of our sub-categories, it was able to perform above average in many of them."

Montreal was said to have a "notable improvement in labour-market activity," but still lagging in non-residential building permits and housing starts.

Ottawa-Gatineau, which has been one of the better-ranked areas in previous surveys, is in the middle of the pack this time at No. 12. The national capital region's momentum has declined do to a slowing housing market, less robust technology industry and struggling manufacturing sector.

Windsor was near the bottom of the list at 22nd with a score of 3.4. The city was hurt by the state of the automotive sector, manufacturing in general and the struggling U.S. economy that it borders on.

Two areas -- Thunder Bay, Ont., and Saguenay, Que. -- were assigned negative scores. The high-valued Canadian dollar and struggling manufacturing industries were cited as factors with each..

Conspicuous by its absence in the survey was Winnipeg, which was left out because officials there were unwilling to disclose necessary information.

THE METRO MONITOR:

economic momentum scores by city:

Calgary 33.2

Edmonton 31.4

Vancouver 22.3

Montreal 22.3

Toronto 17.9

Saskatoon 17.7

Regina 16.3

Victoria 16.2

Sherbrooke 15.2

Halifax 12.3

Kitchener 12.2

Ottawa-Gatineau 10.9

Quebec City 10

Greater Sudbury 9.7

St. John's 9.5

London 9.4

Hamilton 7.1

St. Catharines-Niagara 6.8

Trois-Rivieres 6.5

Saint John 5.1

Kingston 4.9

Windsor 3.4

Thunder Bay 0.9
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  #118  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2007, 6:11 AM
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Thunder Bay: Leading the Economy in Economic Stagnation since 2001.

Sudbury got 9.5? Holy crap. We need to move south.
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  #119  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2007, 3:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post
Thunder Bay: Leading the Economy in Economic Stagnation since 2001.

Sudbury got 9.5? Holy crap. We need to move south.
Congrats to Thunder Bay on their distinction.
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Last edited by newflyer; Jun 4, 2007 at 3:15 AM.
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  #120  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2007, 12:28 AM
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Their distinction.
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