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  #41  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2018, 6:27 PM
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It has no retail, a surface level parking lot with an F-U fence, AND it removes a street. What a waste.
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  #42  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2018, 7:12 PM
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Originally Posted by JACKinBeantown View Post
It has no retail, a surface level parking lot with an F-U fence, AND it removes a street. What a waste.
No street was removed and the parking lot is temporary and it’s an H-E-B parking lot, not the parking lot for this development. It is temporary as H-E-B cobstructes their new parking garage nearby.
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  #43  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2018, 8:17 PM
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No street was removed and the parking lot is temporary and it’s an H-E-B parking lot, not the parking lot for this development. It is temporary as H-E-B cobstructes their new parking garage nearby.

Thank you for clearing this up sirkingwilliam

The latter post is a fine example of people not finding out the FACTS FIRST, before spewing it out into social media. One wonders, is this how FAKE NEWS came to be part of our daily lives now.

But, moving on..... love this new downtown development
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  #44  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2018, 12:51 AM
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Thank you for clearing this up sirkingwilliam

The latter post is a fine example of people not finding out the FACTS FIRST, before spewing it out into social media. One wonders, is this how FAKE NEWS came to be part of our daily lives now.

But, moving on..... love this new downtown development
This post is a fine example of someone on social media saying, "I was wrong."

I based my response on images posted by others which I guess I misread:
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Originally Posted by txex06 View Post

A quick shot of how this project is progressing.
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Originally Posted by deeger View Post
The Ken's Goodyear building at S. Flores and Chavez was torn down last Friday. The rest of that block is a surface lot. Anyone know of any plans for that block? I know it's not the HEB parking lot as that's a block over off of Dwyer Ave. [IMG][/IMG]
Will the next post be you apologizing for overreacting before even giving someone a chance to make amends for a mistake?

And correct me if I'm wrong, but there seems to be no retail, which is a waste of opportunity in a downtown. A huge waste... I mean, look at the size of that block with no retail.
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A few pics from my Bird Scooter Tour today.
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  #45  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2018, 1:24 AM
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Originally Posted by JACKinBeantown View Post
This post is a fine example of someone on social media saying, "I was wrong."

I based my response on images posted by others which I guess I misread:




Will the next post be you apologizing for overreacting before even giving someone a chance to make amends for a mistake?

And correct me if I'm wrong, but there seems to be no retail, which is a waste of opportunity in a downtown. A huge waste... I mean, look at the size of that block with no retail.
I agree, you obviously misinterpreted the pictures posted. No worries, it happens.

However, I don’t think it’s a waste that there’s no retail. Not every residential development has to have retail, if it did, then you’re just creating a lot of unnecessary vacancies that will not get filled or take a lot longer to fill. Empty store fronts is not a pretty visual. The developers obviously did their due diligence and probably saw there wasn’t enough demand for retail to outset any costs or loss of residential space.

If building retail meant a higher profit potential, they’d have built it into the development.

Again, would it have been nice to have retail, sure. But the absence of retail is not a waste in my opnionX
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  #46  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2018, 2:45 AM
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Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post
I agree, you obviously misinterpreted the pictures posted. No worries, it happens.

However, I don’t think it’s a waste that there’s no retail. Not every residential development has to have retail, if it did, then you’re just creating a lot of unnecessary vacancies that will not get filled or take a lot longer to fill. Empty store fronts is not a pretty visual. The developers obviously did their due diligence and probably saw there wasn’t enough demand for retail to outset any costs or loss of residential space.

If building retail meant a higher profit potential, they’d have built it into the development.

Again, would it have been nice to have retail, sure. But the absence of retail is not a waste in my opnionX
I respectfully disagree. On a lot that big and that close to downtown (it actually is downtown) to not even have one retail space on one of the corners is a waste.

And I don't mean to sound snarky, but I don't know how else to communicate this in response to your POV, so I apologize for the seeming snarkiness in advance. It isn't obvious that the developers did their due diligence if they "probably" saw there wasn't enough demand. If you show me their study results, I'll believe it's a fact. Even then, it's not just about how much demand there is now; its about how much demand there will be when they create it, and when others create more after seeing their results. As it is, this is just going to create more traffic and more need for the residents to go elsewhere. Maybe they only studied San Antonians' opinions, and as most people on this forum have indicated they are aware of, San Antonio is a very car-centric city in which most people just aren't aware of another way to live because they haven't experienced it. Whereas people who might move there from New York, Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Miami, Seattle, or any other more expensive city whose people get transferred to less expensive city such as San Antonio, would likely prefer to have a cafe and dry cleaner in their building. If 500+ people live in this building, that's plenty of daily business for a diner, corner store, etc.

Forgive me, but I get tired of people making excuses for the lack of retail in urban residential buildings. Anybody who has ever lived in one of the cities I mentioned is well aware of the need and demand for it. Yeah, it might sit empty for a few months, but the building will be there for 100+ years. That's 100+ years without retail. That's the loss of a golden opportunity to create a more livable setting and eventually triple the rent on the retail establishment as so often happens in those cities I mentioned. That's a waste. That's many different kinds of wastes.

Anyway, that's my blah blah. Please take it in a good light.
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  #47  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2018, 12:44 PM
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Yeah, it might sit empty for a few months, but the building will be there for 100+ years.
If it's going to be here for that long, they should have built out of concrete. Tilt-wall would have been quick and economical for a project like this. They would have been mostly done already!
Suspended slabs would have been cool, but a bit more expensive.

A 100 years out of wood, probably not. Just look at any old apartment complex that's been around for 40+ years...they look like crap! Granted, maybe the management company will be proactive and do maintenance to take care of the building before things fall apart...
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  #48  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2018, 1:15 PM
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If it's going to be here for that long, they should have built out of concrete. Tilt-wall would have been quick and economical for a project like this. They would have been mostly done already!
Suspended slabs would have been cool, but a bit more expensive.

A 100 years out of wood, probably not. Just look at any old apartment complex that's been around for 40+ years...they look like crap! Granted, maybe the management company will be proactive and do maintenance to take care of the building before things fall apart...
So there will be no retail in that entire large city block until at least the year 2058.
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  #49  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2018, 6:58 PM
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Originally Posted by JACKinBeantown View Post
I respectfully disagree. On a lot that big and that close to downtown (it actually is downtown) to not even have one retail space on one of the corners is a waste.

And I don't mean to sound snarky, but I don't know how else to communicate this in response to your POV, so I apologize for the seeming snarkiness in advance. It isn't obvious that the developers did their due diligence if they "probably" saw there wasn't enough demand. If you show me their study results, I'll believe it's a fact. Even then, it's not just about how much demand there is now; its about how much demand there will be when they create it, and when others create more after seeing their results. As it is, this is just going to create more traffic and more need for the residents to go elsewhere. Maybe they only studied San Antonians' opinions, and as most people on this forum have indicated they are aware of, San Antonio is a very car-centric city in which most people just aren't aware of another way to live because they haven't experienced it. Whereas people who might move there from New York, Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Miami, Seattle, or any other more expensive city whose people get transferred to less expensive city such as San Antonio, would likely prefer to have a cafe and dry cleaner in their building. If 500+ people live in this building, that's plenty of daily business for a diner, corner store, etc.

Forgive me, but I get tired of people making excuses for the lack of retail in urban residential buildings. Anybody who has ever lived in one of the cities I mentioned is well aware of the need and demand for it. Yeah, it might sit empty for a few months, but the building will be there for 100+ years. That's 100+ years without retail. That's the loss of a golden opportunity to create a more livable setting and eventually triple the rent on the retail establishment as so often happens in those cities I mentioned. That's a waste. That's many different kinds of wastes.

Anyway, that's my blah blah. Please take it in a good light.
No offense taken. That is your opinion and I respect it, however, I just can not understand your obsession with every urban development having big ground floor retail. It’s not realistic nor is its absence in a residential development unique to San Antonio. Also, that building will not be there for 100 years, that’s a claim I will whole hardedly disagree with you on.
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  #50  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2018, 8:19 PM
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Originally Posted by JACKinBeantown View Post
I respectfully disagree. On a lot that big and that close to downtown (it actually is downtown) to not even have one retail space on one of the corners is a waste.

And I don't mean to sound snarky, but I don't know how else to communicate this in response to your POV, so I apologize for the seeming snarkiness in advance. It isn't obvious that the developers did their due diligence if they "probably" saw there wasn't enough demand. If you show me their study results, I'll believe it's a fact. Even then, it's not just about how much demand there is now; its about how much demand there will be when they create it, and when others create more after seeing their results. As it is, this is just going to create more traffic and more need for the residents to go elsewhere. Maybe they only studied San Antonians' opinions, and as most people on this forum have indicated they are aware of, San Antonio is a very car-centric city in which most people just aren't aware of another way to live because they haven't experienced it. Whereas people who might move there from New York, Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Miami, Seattle, or any other more expensive city whose people get transferred to less expensive city such as San Antonio, would likely prefer to have a cafe and dry cleaner in their building. If 500+ people live in this building, that's plenty of daily business for a diner, corner store, etc.

Forgive me, but I get tired of people making excuses for the lack of retail in urban residential buildings. Anybody who has ever lived in one of the cities I mentioned is well aware of the need and demand for it. Yeah, it might sit empty for a few months, but the building will be there for 100+ years. That's 100+ years without retail. That's the loss of a golden opportunity to create a more livable setting and eventually triple the rent on the retail establishment as so often happens in those cities I mentioned. That's a waste. That's many different kinds of wastes.

Anyway, that's my blah blah. Please take it in a good light.
You're right.
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  #51  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2018, 1:14 PM
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Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post
No offense taken. That is your opinion and I respect it...
Thanks.

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Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post
however, I just can not understand your obsession with every urban development having big ground floor retail.
Here's one of the coolest neighborhoods around. Look at the retail.
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7253...7i16384!8i8192

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Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post
It’s not realistic
Wha?

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Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post
...nor is its absence in a residential development unique to San Antonio.
Correct. San Antonio is full buildings without retail. That's a shame.

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Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post
Also, that building will not be there for 100 years, that’s a claim I will whole hardedly disagree with you on.
As someone pointed out earlier, this building is built to last maybe 40 years. So that's 40 years without retail on this large urban block, and that's a shame.


Go visit a great city and look around at the retail in its urban center. Have fun on your trip.

Last edited by JACKinBeantown; Jun 27, 2018 at 4:00 PM. Reason: link
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  #52  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2018, 6:22 PM
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Originally Posted by JACKinBeantown View Post
Thanks.


Here's one of the coolest neighborhoods around. Look at the retail.
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7253...7i16384!8i8192


Wha?


Correct. San Antonio is full buildings without retail. That's a shame.


As someone pointed out earlier, this building is built to last maybe 40 years. So that's 40 years without retail on this large urban block, and that's a shame.


Go visit a great city and look around at the retail in its urban center. Have fun on your trip.
I don’t want to reply to each breakdown, so I’ll just keep it at this. We both disagree regarding this topic. You and I will both have people who agree and disagree with our positions. Nothing wrong with any of that.

Also, I’ve been to many a great city and explored them, which is how I know San Antonio isn’t the only city where, within their urban area, have residential developments that do not have retail on the ground level. I’ve even seen it in your current city of Boston.
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  #53  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2018, 7:07 PM
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All I got to say is that if your in San Antonio, your already in a great city!
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  #54  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2018, 7:07 PM
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Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post
I don’t want to reply to each breakdown, so I’ll just keep it at this. We both disagree regarding this topic. You and I will both have people who agree and disagree with our positions. Nothing wrong with any of that.

Also, I’ve been to many a great city and explored them, which is how I know San Antonio isn’t the only city where, within their urban area, have residential developments that do not have retail on the ground level. I’ve even seen it in your current city of Boston.
But have you lived in any of those great cities? It's one thing to visit, and another to live with/without retail. You may live in San Antonio, but I bet you don't go to the Alamo every day as the visitors do.

Of course you've seen it in Boston. Boston isn't perfect. And of course you've seen it in other cities. No city is perfect. With all due respect to you as another human being, I don't understand how you can seem to prefer no retail vs. having retail. I realize that's an oversimplification, which is rampant these days, but that's what you seem to be saying in general terms.

All other things being equal, I prefer retail in an urban development. Especially in one that encompasses such a large swath of land as this one does.

Side note: If we were having this conversation in person, I'd buy you a beer. It just wouldn't be on the block where this building is being built. We'd have to go somewhere else.
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  #55  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2018, 9:15 PM
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But have you lived in any of those great cities? It's one thing to visit, and another to live with/without retail. You may live in San Antonio, but I bet you don't go to the Alamo every day as the visitors do.

Of course you've seen it in Boston. Boston isn't perfect. And of course you've seen it in other cities. No city is perfect. With all due respect to you as another human being, I don't understand how you can seem to prefer no retail vs. having retail. I realize that's an oversimplification, which is rampant these days, but that's what you seem to be saying in general terms.

All other things being equal, I prefer retail in an urban development. Especially in one that encompasses such a large swath of land as this one does.

Side note: If we were having this conversation in person, I'd buy you a beer. It just wouldn't be on the block where this building is being built. We'd have to go somewhere else.
Well, you said visit in the quote I was responding to, not sure why you’re not saying live in the cities. Besides that, my point is, developments get built without retail at ground level. I have never once said I prefer a development without retail. I would love ground floor retail with every development, however, it doesn’t erk me as much as it does you when it doesn’t have the retail component nor do I let it affect my opinion of a development in a negative ways sit seems to do to you.

That was my point in all this.

As for the offer, sadly I’d have to decline it as I don’t drink beer. Perhaps a coffee or tea instead!
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  #56  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2018, 11:40 PM
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Well, you said visit in the quote I was responding to, not sure why you’re not saying live in the cities. Besides that, my point is, developments get built without retail at ground level. I have never once said I prefer a development without retail. I would love ground floor retail with every development, however, it doesn’t erk me as much as it does you when it doesn’t have the retail component nor do I let it affect my opinion of a development in a negative ways sit seems to do to you.

That was my point in all this.

As for the offer, sadly I’d have to decline it as I don’t drink beer. Perhaps a coffee or tea instead!
Fair enough. Yes, I do judge the lack of retail because I know from living in New York City, Boston, Los Angeles (Manhattan Beach), and spending time in plenty of others that it makes the neighborhood. That's why I specified living in one of the places. Visitors end up going to restaurants near their hotel or they order room service, so it's a different experience, and a short one.

Mmm... coffee.
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  #57  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2018, 5:13 PM
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  #58  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2018, 5:54 PM
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That area is going to be super dense. With the site being cleared for the Mixed Use project, then the two garages.

Something Tells me HEB is going to redevelop the parking lot on Flores and Cesar to a bigger HEB or more retail.
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  #59  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2018, 8:00 PM
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The lack of retail is astounding.
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  #60  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2018, 8:40 PM
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That area is going to be super dense. With the site being cleared for the Mixed Use project, then the two garages.
Not to mention UTSA.
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