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  #41  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2008, 7:27 PM
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As an example, Waterfront Park Place in Louisville is 22 stories and 264 ft/80 meters tall and is a residential tower. That would work out to 12 ft/floor.

Also, in Louisville, the E on U.S. Tower is one floor taller, at 23 stories and 328 ft/100 meters tall and is not a residential tower. That works out to 14.26 ft/floor. National City Tower is 40 stories, it is 512 ft/156 meters tall and is also an office tower. That works out to 12.8 ft/floor. I have also read, however that NCT is 38 floors above ground and 2 below. I think it was on their website that listed floor 38 as the top floor but can't recall for sure. If it is 38, that would work out to 13.47 ft/floor. The Meidinger Tower is 26 stories and 363 ft/111 meters and again is an office tower. That works out to 13.96 ft/floor.
Lastly, PNC Plaza is 30 stories and 420 ft/128 meters tall and is an office tower. That works out to 14 ft/floor.

In Nashville, the Viridian Tower is 31 floors, 115 meters, 378 ft tall and that works out to 12.19 ft/floor. The Cumberland Tower is 23 stories 236 ft/72 meters tall, and that works out to 10.26 ft/floor.

Between all the residential towers listed, the avg is 11.483 ft. The avg w/out Cumberland is 12.095 ft.

Between the office towers, the avg floor height would be 13.755 ft. So there is definitely a difference from residential to office towers. One of the ones that really comes to mind as being tall with a low floor count is the Bank of America Tower in Atlanta. That tower is 1023 ft and only 55 floors. I know it has the spire at the top, but I don't know how much of the height that takes up. It looks to me to be between 200-300 ft. That would make each floor between 13.15 ft & 14.96 ft.

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  #42  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2008, 7:57 PM
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Nice project for Lexington. I hope this goes ahead.
     
     
  #43  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2008, 12:27 AM
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I agree that the floor height seems low even for residential standards. Evanston (just North of Chicago) has a 49 story all residential proposal that will top out at 523 feet. In fact, I'm not aware of a current proposal that uses such small floor heights. I'm sure there is something somewhere though.

Then again, It is possible to have this height. The 800 in Louisville has 29 floors and a total height of 290 feet. Then there is Chicago's Lake Point Tower which has 70 floors crammed into 645 feet. Of course, these are all older buildings and I wonder how much cost is actually saved by making the floors shorter.
     
     
  #44  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2008, 12:06 AM
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Interesting.

With high-rise, Dudley Webb is back
BROTHERS BUILT ON LARGE SCALE IN 1980S
By Jim Jordan
JJORDAN1@HERALD-LEADER.COM
Brothers Donald and Dudley Webb gave Lexington its modern skyline in the 1980s with 14 buildings that include the city's tallest, the 30-story Lexington Financial Center.

Then the bulldozers stopped. Changes in federal tax laws, a real estate recession and the loss of financing from Kentucky Central Life Insurance Co. ended the Webb building spree.

The lawsuits that followed the collapse of Kentucky Central pushed the brothers into the courtroom and out of the limelight for a dozen years.

Donald Webb retired, but Dudley Webb returned to downtown redevelopment Tuesday when The Webb Cos. and partners announced a $250 million hotel, condominium, retail and office project that would reshape West Main Street between Limestone and Upper Street.

CentrePointe would be one of the city's tallest buildings, at 40 stories and 406 feet, and also one of its largest, with 77 condos, 243 hotel rooms, 85,000 square feet of offices and 1,100 parking spaces, mostly underground.

From almost any window on CentrePointe's south side, observers would be able to look across West Vine Street and contrast CentrePointe with the six-story First Federal Plaza.

First Federal, built in the 1970s and containing just 44,000 square feet, was the Webb brothers' first office project in downtown Lexington.

Dudley and Donald Webb were born in the coal-mining town of Hot Spot near Whitesburg in Letcher County, but they came to Central Kentucky for higher education. Both graduated from Georgetown College and the University of Kentucky College of Law.

Donald joined state government and Dudley began practicing law in Lexington. Donald later served as a special assistant at the White House during the Johnson administration and practiced law with a Louisville firm.

In 1971, Donald and Dudley formed their own Lexington law firm, and the following year, a real estate investment and development firm that would become The Webb Cos. in 1979.

In the meantime, the brothers met Lexington financier Garvice D. Kincaid, who controlled Kentucky Central, Central Bank & Trust Co. and other banks and businesses.

Kincaid began financing Webb developments. That source of funds continued after Kincaid's death in 1975 when W.E. "Bud" Burnett became president of Kentucky Central.

The brothers' other downtown projects include The Woodlands, Vine Center, Triangle Center, Victorian Square and the Commerce Lexington building.

The Webb Cos. was also active in Lexington's growing suburbs, building Corporate Center and other office parks; warehouses and distribution centers; and shopping centers, including The Mall at Lexington Green, Tates Creek Centre and Palomar Center.

They eventually built 5.5 million square feet of structures in Fayette County that are now assessed for a total of $250 million, according to The Webb Cos.

Most of Donald Webb's projects were in the Lexington area, but Dudley branched out with developments in many parts of the country, including New England, New York, Florida, Louisiana, Texas, Colorado and California. Donald participated in some of those developments.

Most of the Webbs' Lexington projects were successful. But at least one, Victorian Square, struggled financially for years, and another, Festival Market, failed.

Built for $16 million, Festival Market was owned 80 percent by Kentucky Central and 20 percent by the Webbs.

The site at West Main and North Broadway was purchased with $1.675 million from the federal government. The local government lent $500,000 from a community development block grant as the required match for the federal funding.

Festival Market opened in 1986 as an entertainment, restaurant and retail center, but it never made a profit. The building was sold for $600,000 in 1994 in an auction that was intended to pay off the holders of $8 million in local government bonds that had been sold to help finance the project.

Festival Market reopened in 1999 as Triangle Center, a successful retail, restaurant and office center.

By that time, Kentucky Central had disappeared.

In 1993, a year after suffering the largest loss in its history, Kentucky Central invited state regulators to take control to protect its policyholders. The insurer was later declared insolvent, and regulators began selling off its assets.

In 1994, the state insurance commissioner filed suit against the Webbs to collect $108.9 million in loans they had received from Kentucky Central.

The lawsuit resulted in 10 Webb-related limited partnerships filing Chapter 11 bankruptcies, but The Webb Cos. and the Webb brothers were never in bankruptcy.

The brothers stopped commenting publicly on most issues, and they started only a few minor projects until CentrePointe. The Webb Cos. focused largely on managing properties for themselves and others.

After Donald retired and Dudley became chairman of The Webb Cos., Donald's son, Woodford, became the company president.

Finally, the Kentucky Central shadow lifted.

After years of victories and defeats in court, out-of-court settlements were reached in 2005. Donald Webb settled his part of the lawsuit for $2.85 million and Dudley settled three months later for $1 million.

In April 2007, The Webb Cos. won a $5 million contract to build a marina at Dale Hollow Lake State Resort Park near Burkesville.

Dudley Webb was back in the game.
     
     
  #45  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2008, 2:52 PM
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Digg it del.icio.us AIM Views could change
Downtowners fear new building will block vistas
By Michelle Ku
MKU@HERALD-LEADER.COM

David Perry | Staff
Charles Coyle stood on his 20th floor balcony at Park Plaza Apartments. He and his late wife were the first residents there when the building opened in 1989. Photo by David Perry | staff
Comments The view of Lexington's cityscape from Charles Coyle's home in Park Plaza Apartments includes the Lexington Financial Center, Phoenix Park and the city's twin courthouses.

But Coyle's view of the Financial Center would be blocked by the proposed 40-story CentrePointe hotel development. Phoenix Park would also be obstructed by a five-story parking garage directly in front of Park Plaza.

Coyle's not thrilled by the possible change. He said the proposed hotel is a bit too tall and he doesn't like the parking garage in the park at all. "I enjoy the view that I have now."

Residents of Park Plaza and others who live near the CentrePointe block are closely watching the hotel development. While some have focused on the look and size of the building, or the fate of existing buildings on the block, others worry about the project's effect on Phoenix Park at the corner of Main and Limestone.

For years, Phoenix Park has been the site of community events, protests, concerts and downtown races. It has also been a gathering spot for the city's homeless.

"The residents of Park Plaza are in an uproar," said Dennis Anderson of Anderson Communities, which owns Park Plaza. "That's our most popular side of the building. Looking down from the building onto the park and the fountains is what people want. It's part of the ambience of living downtown with the convenience, lifestyle and the view."

The Webb Cos., the developers of the hotel, are proposing to take about one-third of Phoenix Park for a garage that would have two levels of underground parking, 15,000 square feet of ground-level retail and a four-level parking garage above ground. The remainder of the park would be landscaped and include public art.

The garage is critical because the proposed development requires 1,100 parking spaces. About 650 of those would be in an underground parking garage on the site of the hotel.

The view from the Park Plaza apartments won't change, said Dudley Webb, chairman of the board of The Webb Cos. "They haven't seen it yet, so I don't know if they would know. But again, that's part of the selling process. We have to sell it to them as well."

When completed, the garage would be a "win-win for them," Webb said. "They (would) have great restaurants, shopping -- everything up there that they don't have now -- and a beautiful park."

Phoenix Park stands on the site of the former Phoenix Hotel, which was razed in 1982 to make way for the World Coal Center. The coal center was never constructed, and the park was built in 1984 as Lexington prepared to host the NCAA finals in 1985.

Before construction on either the hotel or the parking garage can begin, the city and the state must first approve financing for the development. Once the financing is in place, "we can come back and fine-tune the details," Webb said.

Those details include getting approval from the state, which owns the land where the garage would sit, and city approval to build a garage on part of the park. The city's deed for the park includes a "perpetual easement" to use the state's land as a park.

Webb also wants to get Anderson to sign off on the garage. "I don't want them to be unhappy about it."

Anderson supports the redevelopment of the block bounded by Vine, Main and Upper streets and Limestone, where most of CentrePointe will sit. It will bring a spark of new energy to downtown, he said.

But the hotel development, including the parking garage, should be contained on that single block, he said. "I don't think we should do it at the sacrifice of another block ... They can come up with a design that's better that fits that site."

Besides Park Plaza, others that would be affected by the parking garage include park users, the Lexington Public Library and the Downtown Lexington Corp., which holds events in the park.

A reconfigured Phoenix Park with a proposed Jumbotron screen on the parking structure will bring "people to that space in a way that hasn't been done and will have a great benefit to the library," said Kathleen Imhoff, library executive director.

The current configuration of the park with its steps and water feature makes it difficult to put up tents for larger events, Imhoff said.

The Artists Market, which is held in Phoenix Park on Saturdays in June, July and August, will have to be moved, said Renee Jackson, executive director of the Downtown Lexington Corp. "We will definitely continue the market somewhere."

Options include Triangle Park or a couple of sites on Manchester Street, Jackson said.

Some downtown residents worry about what the project might mean for the homeless who often gather in the park.

In taking away a third of the park, the city needs to be cognizant of the homeless population, said Park Plaza resident Janet Corum. "This has been sort of a safe haven for homeless people to be in. I would hate for it to be a place that people didn't feel like they could come freely.

Still, taking part of the park for a hotel parking garage could be a good thing, said James Baker, who spends about an hour or two at the park nearly every day. "People do need a place to stay," he said of the proposed hotel.

Once the park is rebuilt "it will be a really good spot," Baker said.

Joan Lyons, a Park Plaza resident, walks her dog, Daisy, through Phoenix Park and the Courthouse Plaza three times a day. She likes the greenspace that Phoenix Park provides.

The apartment residents understand that things change, but they don't want to lose the park, Lyons said. "It's hard for me and several of us to like the concept of the parking garage."
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  #46  
Old Posted Mar 13, 2008, 3:43 PM
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Nice! Hope it gets built, they deserve one....a long time coming.
     
     
  #47  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2008, 7:23 PM
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http://www.kentucky.com/454/story/362836.html

I guess people in Lexington really don't like the design. I think the design is awesome. I think with all the glass, it will complement the LFC quite well. I'm surprised the design is being debated as so. I guess some of the reason could be the fact of 'smart growth'. I'd have to read a little more about what's going on to make my decision regarding that. I guess this article is good news to say the least. Still planning on building it and working things out.
     
     
  #48  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2008, 10:45 PM
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This building will give the downtown an update after a long time. I feel to go ahead with the project.
     
     
  #49  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2008, 10:56 PM
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While I don't think it's a top 10 building as far as design or excitement for me, I do like it quite a bit from what I've seen of it and hope it gets built if it is a good fit for the rest of the area.

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  #50  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2008, 11:07 PM
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I do agree that design is not everything of a building. When I first saw the building at a computer generated model, it did look akward. However, the building will provide a 4star (i believe) hotel and as a result, will provide a boost in economy in Lexington.
     
     
  #51  
Old Posted May 25, 2008, 9:53 AM
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I used to live in Lexington, so I was excited to hear about this project. Most of downtown Lexington is badly in need of something new and exciting. I think this building will look a little out of place, just because it's reasonably attractive and modern. lol. Every time there is any sort of new proposal in Lexington the "historic preservationists" come out in force. The buildings they are concerned about saving are nothing unique or remarkable and actually quite rundown looking. Lexington is a very conservative/cautious town and change scares a lot of people.

I do wonder if Lexington can support a building of this size. I know downtown is still struggling mightily and I wonder if one building is enough to turn things around and generate excitement. Many people in Lexington still take a skeptical view of anything they would consider as "big city". I'd be interested to hear what type of economic research has been done. What are the occupancy rates of other hotels in the downtown area (is there a need for another)? How will this draw people, conventions and money to downtown? What is the current demand for high-priced, downtown living? How many businesses would be interested in paying the high rent to occupy a space like this?

I think these are all legitimate concerns. Hopefully this can get built and be successful. I'd really like to see downtown Lexington start moving forward a bit. It's currently a very quiet, stodgy place for a major college town with a growing metro.
     
     
  #52  
Old Posted Jun 10, 2008, 3:27 AM
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The rendering link nor article link work anymore. Any new news?
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  #53  
Old Posted Jun 23, 2008, 9:26 PM
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lexington will now have 5 skyscrapers in its syline if this does get approved.
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  #54  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2008, 3:05 AM
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It was approved. Yay!

Webbs get permission to begin demolition
By Beverly Fortune
bfortune@herald-leade4r.com

The city's Division of Building Inspection gave the go-ahead Friday for the Webb Companies to take down four properties on South Limestone to begin clearing the block for construction of the CentrePointe luxury high-rise hotel, condominium and retail complex.


The buildings are 109, 117, 119-121 South Limestone.


Approval was not given to immediately raze 111 South Limestone because of asbestos concerns.


“They can start tearing them down tomorrow,” said Susan Straub, spokeswoman for the city, when asked about a timetable for demolition.


Diversified Demolition, a Lexington company, has the contract to raze the buildings.


Code Inspection roped off one-third of the parking lot next to the Rite Aid building on Friday because of concerns that the building's wall was unstable and could collapse.


Also on Friday, a request to demolish the remaining buildings on the block was submitted to Building Inspection office. There will be a 30-day hold on getting the permit while the Office of Historic Preservation conducts a historical study of the buildings and weighs an appeal to the Planning Commission.


“This starts the 30-day clock ticking,” Straub said.


Developer Dudley Webb's company owns the Rite Aid building at 100 West Main and 152 West Main that formerly housed the Mad Hatter hat shop.


Webb said businessman Joe Rosenberg's family owns the remaining buildings.


Among those owned by the Rosenbergs is 126 South Upper Street, the Rosenberg jewelry store and pawn shop.Dating back to 1826, it is considered the oldest commercial building in downtown Lexington that has been in continuous use since it was built.


All of those buildings will come down.
     
     
  #55  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2008, 3:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lex75 View Post
I used to live in Lexington, so I was excited to hear about this project. Most of downtown Lexington is badly in need of something new and exciting. I think this building will look a little out of place, just because it's reasonably attractive and modern. lol. Every time there is any sort of new proposal in Lexington the "historic preservationists" come out in force. The buildings they are concerned about saving are nothing unique or remarkable and actually quite rundown looking. Lexington is a very conservative/cautious town and change scares a lot of people.

I do wonder if Lexington can support a building of this size. I know downtown is still struggling mightily and I wonder if one building is enough to turn things around and generate excitement. Many people in Lexington still take a skeptical view of anything they would consider as "big city". I'd be interested to hear what type of economic research has been done. What are the occupancy rates of other hotels in the downtown area (is there a need for another)? How will this draw people, conventions and money to downtown? What is the current demand for high-priced, downtown living? How many businesses would be interested in paying the high rent to occupy a space like this?

I think these are all legitimate concerns. Hopefully this can get built and be successful. I'd really like to see downtown Lexington start moving forward a bit. It's currently a very quiet, stodgy place for a major college town with a growing metro.
It's still a damn shame that World Coal Center wasn't built, but at least Big Blue was. I remember seeing that in the distance at 5 years old and thinking how big Lexington was because of that building.
     
     
  #56  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2008, 5:11 AM
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  #57  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2009, 6:33 PM
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Look like construction on this might be about 6-8 weeks away. Apparently some permitting issues need to be cleared up first. By the way, this will top out at 550' making it the new tallest in the state of KY. I know there are a lot of doubters on this project, but it seems a lot of money has already been committed it's coming from a private source. Don't look for this one to fail with the 2010 Equestrian games coming to town--those games are worth $1 Billion+ even in a bad economy.
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  #58  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2009, 8:21 PM
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Thank you for that DB, that's the most positive news I've heard on this forum (not just this thread, but the whole damn forum) in a while. What a treat to see a state's new tallest actually come to fruition amdist so much economical turmoil.
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  #59  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2009, 6:03 PM
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Centrepointe: fast-tracked and now stalled

As a side note, the Centrepointe article has been updated regarding the latest delays. I think that the thread can be modified to list "Centrepointe" instead of "Hotel" and that the floor numbers can be modified to 35.

Centrepointe: fast-tracked and now stalled
Authored by Sherman Cahal on July 15, 2009 at UrbanUp

Centrepointe, proposed on March 3, 2008, is a $250 million, 35-story skyscraper in downtown Lexington, Kentucky. Bounded by Main, Vine, Limestone and Upper streets, the development consisted of a four-star, 243-room hotel, 77 residential condominium units, retail and restaurant space, and offices. The tower would also incorporate LEED features, including green roofs and energy-efficient windows along with other sundries.

The rendering of Centrepointe was criticized from nearly the beginning, with the most vocal cheerleaders coming from Vice Mayor Gray and numerous bloggers, calling the skyscraper out of synchronization with the harmony of the downtown core -- dominated by small- to mid-rise mixed-use structures. Gray pointed out that the Downtown Master Plan, which was completed only several years prior and involved input from hundreds of citizens, called for a maximum building height of 15 stories in the downtown core. Others also lashed out at the generic design and the partial removal of Phoenix Park across the street that would make way for additional retail and parking.

Centrepointe's proposal called for the removal of one entire block of unused and active buildings, some of which were historically significant. Included were two of Lexington's oldest commercial structures -- the Rosenberg structure.

You can read and comment on the latest UrbanUp blog post here.
     
     
  #60  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2009, 8:28 PM
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LEXINGTON | CentrePointe | 550FT | 35 FLOORS
     
     
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