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  #53041  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 5:55 AM
nealberke nealberke is offline
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Originally Posted by CaliNative View Post
Does aging improve beer like wine and liquor? Old beer turns stale, especially if unrefrigerated. I'll stick with unaged Brew 102. Delish.
I quickly poked around the internet for an answer to your question.
1 Beer can get "skunky" with age. So, fresher is better
2 Some beer drinkers will intentionally age cans of beer and drink those cans after pull date.
3 Beer might have a metal taste if it's in the can too long.
4 "High alcohol" beers (9% Alcohol per volume) are designed for aging.
5 I personally would not age cans of beer on a bet. I've had thin aluminum cans of both pop and beer open up on me while stored in a garage closet. What a mess. And I would not bet that the pop or beer was wholesome prior to spraying all over the garage cabinet. I leave the lagering to the pros and drink what they create without improving on it. Few things improve with freezing or aging at home.
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  #53042  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 6:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir_Noir View Post

The Phoenix Bakery and South China Gifts in 1941.



Google Books - Chinatown in Los Angeles by Jenny Cho

Here is the original drawing for that corner of the New Chinatown. [1936-37]


huntington

Buildings for Mr. You Chung Hong by architects Erle Webster & Adrian Wilson made for the rebuilding of Los Angeles’ New Chinatown (1936-40s). In the mid-1930s, all of Old Chinatown was torn down to make way for Union Station. Many of the displaced families and businesses went to the nearby 900 block of North Broadway and developed New Chinatown. The drawings by Webster & Wilson show the development of this historic area of Los Angeles through survey records, street plans and drawings for buildings for Y. C. Hong.




And here are two alternative designs for the same corner.


huntington






huntington



..............................................................................The client, You Chung Hong








.
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  #53043  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 10:39 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
.

I imagine most of the attractive young women are ingenues & starlets from First National Pictures.



It would be so great to go back in time and meet some of these people.

.
I wonder what these people from almost 100 years ago would think of our times? What would amaze them the most? I would guess pocket supercomputers posing as a phone, instant worldwide communications and the internet, more than even jet and space travel. Would they choose to live in our times, or go back to theirs? It would be nice to be a time tourist and go on a vacation in the past or future, but there's no place like home. Couple of good "Twilight Zone" episodes on this topic. It boggles my mind when I realize that my high school graduation in 1969 was closer to 1927 than to today. 42 years to 1927, 50 years from today. My birth year, 1952, was only 23 years after the 1929 crash. Time flies and one day you look in the mirror and see an old man.

Last edited by CaliNative; Nov 21, 2019 at 10:57 AM.
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  #53044  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 11:12 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Originally Posted by nealberke View Post
I quickly poked around the internet for an answer to your question.
1 Beer can get "skunky" with age. So, fresher is better
2 Some beer drinkers will intentionally age cans of beer and drink those cans after pull date.
3 Beer might have a metal taste if it's in the can too long.
4 "High alcohol" beers (9% Alcohol per volume) are designed for aging.
5 I personally would not age cans of beer on a bet. I've had thin aluminum cans of both pop and beer open up on me while stored in a garage closet. What a mess. And I would not bet that the pop or beer was wholesome prior to spraying all over the garage cabinet. I leave the lagering to the pros and drink what they create without improving on it. Few things improve with freezing or aging at home.
As I suspected. Old beer is generally bad beer, except possibly for the higher alcohol brews. I guess the alcohol (and refrigeration) keeps the bad microbes away. As far as aluminum cans goes, I prefer bottled beer over canned beers. Some of the aluminum and can lining polymers must leach into the beer. Plastic even worse. Thankfully I'm not aware of any beer in plastic bottles like soda pop and bottled water.
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  #53045  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 7:35 PM
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At a dinner party I was given an old Michelob that tasted rather funky so I held it up to a light and could see 'sea monkeys' swimming around. ...
After that, I make sure to check the date on any beer I am about to drink.


.......................................................................................

..............................................................................................It was actually sediment floating around.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Nov 21, 2019 at 9:52 PM.
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  #53046  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 7:49 PM
riichkay riichkay is offline
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A general question on uploading from Photobucket, in a recent post of mine the images were far too large, and a scroll bar appeared....

I asked Photobucket support about the issue, they suggested the following:

"You can add ?width="1024" height="768" at the end of your image links. You can adjust the width and height to your preference."

Anyone else have this issue?...the Photobucket solution is really not that much of an imposition, just wondering if there is a way to change the settings where the images would appear properly sized, as they had in the past.
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  #53047  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 8:19 PM
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I've been using Photobucket for years (and have the scars to prove it!). You used to be able to display larger images by having the suffix ~original on the filename (otherwise they were scaled to 1024px wide or high), but I think that stopped in one of the last site overhauls. To be honest, since then I've been scaling my images to 1024x768 or smaller, and wasn't sure whether I could still display larger files. I'll have to experiment with your suggestion over the weekend. Thanks for the tip, riichkay.
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  #53048  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 9:58 PM
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.

Original snapshot - Chinatown, Los Angeles c 1946

There's the mural again!


eBay

It looks like it might be a special occasion for the couple. The lady is wearing a corsage.




By the look on their faces it must be their anniversary.


detail


.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Nov 21, 2019 at 10:11 PM.
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  #53049  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 10:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
At a dinner party I was given an old Michelob that tasted rather funky so I held it up to a light and could see 'sea monkeys' swimming around. ...
After that, I make sure to check the date on any beer I am about to drink.


.......................................................................................

..............................................................................................It was actually sediment floating around.


Ha E.R. Are you sure it wasn't those four shots of tequila you had before the beer that helped you see the sea monkeys?


My skunky beer story - When I was stationed in Taiwan in 1974, the military brought the beer in on ships. That meant that the beer was kept warm for the slow trip over. All the beer in cans was skunky. The only beer in bottles was Michelob, which wasn't too bad. Not much skunk taste and no sea monkeys either.

Last edited by FredH; Nov 21, 2019 at 10:52 PM.
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  #53050  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2019, 12:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FredH View Post
Ha E.R. Are you sure it wasn't those four shots of tequila you had before the beer that helped you see the sea monkeys?


My skunky beer story - When I was stationed in Taiwan in 1974, the military brought the beer in on ships. That meant that the beer was kept warm for the slow trip over. All the beer in cans was skunky. The only beer in bottles was Michelob, which wasn't too bad. Not much skunk taste and no sea monkeys either.

ltr

SS Lane Victory....one of those beer transport ships sits in LA Harbor ...She's open to visitors daily.

Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Nov 22, 2019 at 5:25 AM.
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  #53051  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2019, 12:25 AM
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Here is a truly phenomenal photograph of the Swanfeldt Tent & Awning Co. at 220 S. Main in downtown Los Angeles.....eBay


eBay

What's up with the string?....Who's dat upstairs? . . .the young Swanfeldt family?
As you asked many a question in this and subsequent post, I thought I'd zoom in on a few interesting tidbits.

First of all, thought I'd float a theory. Why all the patriotic bunting? Well, here's a May 1901 ad for the Fiesta de las Flores, and it's Swanfeldt's for all your patriotic bunting needs, especially since we have an "honored guest":



Thus maybe they were all turned out for the Presidential visit. I think that also answers the question of "what's with the string?" — though it was not string, but wire. Here is a snippet that talks about McKinley's parade cruising along Main Street, and about the wires that were erected to keep parade-watchers back:



Anyway, let's take a look at that baby—or is it?



Guess we'll never know! Check out mysterious inviso-face guy:



And this lady, who totally did it with Martin Van Buren when she was sixteen:



There's this incredible Odd Fellows lamp in the doorway—



And this one above, of the "Friendship, Love & Truth" interlocking oval rings symbol of the order, done with incandescent bulbs—



But mostly I love these two fellows, who apparently have fashioned sleeves for themselves out of awning material—



Guy on the right is like an even more badass version of Lee Marvin in the Wild One, which you wouldn't think possible, but there you are

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  #53052  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2019, 1:51 AM
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You really brought the photograph to life for us, Beaudry. ...Thanks so much!
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  #53053  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2019, 4:35 AM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is online now
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Ah, Lee Marvin in The Wild One. What a performance, playing somebody who was thrown out of Marlin Brando's motorcycle gang as a social undesirable.

Cheers,

Earl
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  #53054  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2019, 2:33 PM
Noir_Noir Noir_Noir is offline
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Swanfeldt Tent & Awning Co.

A man walks into Swanfeldt Tent & Awning Co. in 1915.

Store Assistant : What kind of tent have you in mind Sir?

Man: Oh no ... tents are way too easy to get out of ... I'm thinking more along the lines of ...





christies.com


Sold for 30,000 Sterling in 2011.
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  #53055  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2019, 9:10 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Originally Posted by Beaudry View Post
[...]

Anyway, let's take a look at that baby—or is it?


________________________________________________________________

And "Thing" is there, too!

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  #53056  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2019, 6:46 PM
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Tragedy mystery.

I have been looking through some of my old files and happened upon this rppc showing a damaged, truncated bridge in Long Beach.



"Seaside Foot Bridge......Scene of fatal tradgedy [sic] March - 1938............................................................................................................................................Hoffman Photo Service, Long Beach, Calif. E"


There's no doubt that the damage was caused by the infamous flood of 1938.... Does anyone know what "fatal tragedy" happened on this bridge?

.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Nov 23, 2019 at 7:30 PM.
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  #53057  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2019, 7:20 PM
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Okay folks, here's one more mystery for this Saturday afternoon.

I have this one labeled. . ."Mystery Boxcar, Topanga Canyon."


ethereal_files

As you can see, the railcar appears to be spanning a small chasm leading to (and attached to) a ramshackled house.

This took quite an effort!






Sorry, but I can't remember where I found the photograph.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Nov 24, 2019 at 7:41 AM.
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  #53058  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2019, 7:55 PM
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It's still there (see link below image).


GSV

There are many pictures of the house at realtor.com. I also found the following text by Scott Stevens on flickr.com:
"In 1973 this freight car bridge was the only access to my home in Topanga Canyon. Foot access only. It was a rental which had the dubious distinction of having the worst flea infestation I've ever come across. Loved the house and location so fought the fleas and won. I took a trip to Calcutta and Nepal for about a month and left the house in the hands of a fellow we called Boston Bert who was helping a great band of our friends called Country. Michael Fondiler, Steve Fondiler, Ian Espinoza, Tom DeSimone and Tom Snow were creating awesome music together. When I returned from Nepal I found the living room floor moldings lined with empty Jack Daniels bottles, 2 deep in some places, as Bert always did enjoy a party. Good house, good friends and good times."
There are plenty of other photos online.
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  #53059  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2019, 11:14 PM
Lwize Lwize is offline
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Originally Posted by LATIMES.COM

Old L.A. is rapidly disappearing. We have to honor our past and fight blandness

By Nita Lelyveld City Beat Columnist

Maybe it’s the shortening of the days, the way darkness now is falling so fast. But I find myself especially wistful lately as I watch old Los Angeles being torn down all around me.

I am grateful for every effort to preserve our better-known city treasures — historically significant architecture, landmarks like Angels Flight. But the quaint century-old homes, the homegrown, one-of-a-kind small storefronts, the low-slung vernacular architecture that to me so represents the city is getting disappeared fast by developers with barely a word in its defense.

In Hollywood, where I live, on some residential streets, it seems every other modest bungalow built in the early years of the last century now is tucked behind a green construction fence. Usually when I come upon one, a “Notice of Demolition” already is up.

When I pass by next, I think, I may just see a pit or a pile of dirt.

So what do I do when there is nothing left to do?

I stand still and soak up a gently pitched roof, decorative shingles that look like the scales on a fish, an old porch built to be friendly and inviting. I let each little detail soak in. And then, because this is the modern age and I am ever equipped, I pull out my iPhone and record an image or two of the condemned.

I am a Los Angeles memory keeper. I know I am far from alone. Since I first wrote about my fear that Los Angeles was losing too much of its texture, I have been hearing from others in the clan.

We who love the L.A. we are losing are especially enamored of its lack of uniformity, its many different styles rubbing shoulders — emphasis here on styles. We tend not to feel much affection for the new generic apartment boxes popping up everywhere as if all out of the same catalog. I wonder whether we can come together and make our feelings known in a way that matters before too much is erased.

I recently walked around Historic Filipinotown with photojournalist Lexis-Olivier Ray, who is documenting the demolitions and new building in his own fast-changing neighborhood. He and I stood staring at a large white, brown and beige apartment complex rising up. We looked at homes over a century old that people have made their own, surrounding them with jungles of tropical plants. We peered over a green construction fence at a large Craftsman-style dwelling about to come down. A couple of weeks later, he sent me a shot of the bulldozing.

Housing, housing, we need housing. I haven’t missed the message. I know we need a lot more affordable places for people to live. But I can’t help feeling that in the name of trying to stem a crisis they don’t really care about, too many developers are being given license to get away with whatever they please, regardless of what it does to our communities.

Right now, speculators are free to trample characterful neighborhoods in which they have no stake to try to cash in quickly on characterless buildings in which they’ve invested no care and no heart. They rarely are stopped from pushing out renters of lesser means to try to woo buyers of greater means. They build boxes and bait them with the latest in smart lighting and gleaming stainless steel not for the people who have roots in the surrounding streets but for the ones who will soon push them out.

It seems to me that we should fight the argument that any talk of preservation is anti-housing. Because it doesn’t have to be. We can be for affordable housing but against the kind of utter freedom to tear down and put up just about anything at all anywhere in the name of it that on the block just east of mine has produced the kind of development that makes neighborhood people cry.

Two nicely preserved Craftsman homes now find themselves stuck on either side of a taller, ugly fourplex that was built on spec and sits empty, for sale, where another fine Craftsman in a lovely row of them once stood.

Nathan Marsak, a local historian, has been so saddened by the speed and the thoughtless nature of the development of late that in September he started a blog he calls R.I.P. Los Angeles.

On the city’s planning website, he finds places that are being knocked down and then takes a moment to say a word in memoriam.

Recently, he showcased 933 S. Gramercy Place in Koreatown — a “7 room, 1,840sf Craftsman bungalow ... built in the spring of 1912.”

“There are precious few Craftsmans left in this part of the world; they’ve been nearly exterminated east of Wilton,” he wrote. “Look closely at the expressive use of brick on the chimney and porch.”

History is Marsak’s love. It isn’t what pays the bills. He says he only wishes he had time to do more than just mention a few of the many buildings on the way out. And he hopes he can find ways to get some attention while there still is a chance to save them. He also hopes he can at least jumpstart an important conversation.

“The fabric of our city is woven together by communities and neighborhoods who no longer have a say in their zoning or planning so it’s important to shine a light on these vanishing treasures, now, before the remarkable character of our city is wiped away like a stain from a countertop,” he wrote in an explanation of the blog’s purpose.

Photographer Ashley Noelle records Los Angeles for posterity with a large view camera — the old-fashioned-looking kind with the accordion pleats known as a bellows. She calls the camera Henry and takes it with her as she travels the city. In a minute or two, she can pop out of her Prius, put Henry on a tripod and capture a striking facade. She does it head on, from across the street, usually on cloudy days to eliminate shadow.

Like me, Noelle is an L.A. transplant who fell head over heels for this city. She grew up in a small town in Florida. She arrived here 26 years ago and says she felt instantly, completely at home.

“It was kind of like if you try on a coat at a thrift store and it’s been broken in by somebody else but it just fits perfect and you just feel it,” she told me.

She is drawn most especially to mom-and-pop storefronts. She loves the ones with the sweet, corny names you can just tell someone thought up in their living room. Where else, she says, do you find little apartment buildings built to look like castles? Or a garage specializing in Cadillacs with a pink Cadillac on the roof?

Like me, she often looks at a place and sees stories.

“Can you imagine all the generations that have gone through that door?” she’ll think to herself. Or, “Think of the guy who’s paying the light bill for that sign that’s been there forever.”

A lot of photos she has taken in recent years for what she calls her Los Angeles Series are of places that no longer stand. She thinks of herself as a photographer of “the underdog,” she told me.

For years now, on social media, I’ve been trying to make our big city feel smaller and cozier by creating a community around the hashtag #mydayinla on Twitter. I often use it to celebrate the underdog too and to share photographic evidence of subtle shifts in my neighborhood.

But the commemorative photos I take of the disappearing bungalows mostly aren’t for show. They’re a quieter, more private form of tribute akin to grief — a way of saying, yes, I see you. Families were raised in you. I thank you for your service. When you are gone and in your stead comes some bland, boxy building — perhaps with stripes or bright blocks of color as its only exterior embellishment — I will still look at the space where you stood and remember you and your more charming, more homey, more welcoming face.

And I will try to make a case for saving some of your neighbors.
https://www.latimes.com/california/s...honor-our-past

https://www.riplosangeles.com/

the LOS ANGELES series
a photographic love letter by artist ASHLEY NOELLE:


https://www.thelosangelesseries.com/
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  #53060  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2019, 11:26 PM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Originally Posted by HossC View Post


It's still there (see link below image).


GSV

There are many pictures of the house at realtor.com. I also found the following text by Scott Stevens on flickr.com:
"In 1973 this freight car bridge was the only access to my home in Topanga Canyon. Foot access only. It was a rental which had the dubious distinction of having the worst flea infestation I've ever come across. Loved the house and location so fought the fleas and won. I took a trip to Calcutta and Nepal for about a month and left the house in the hands of a fellow we called Boston Bert who was helping a great band of our friends called Country. Michael Fondiler, Steve Fondiler, Ian Espinoza, Tom DeSimone and Tom Snow were creating awesome music together. When I returned from Nepal I found the living room floor moldings lined with empty Jack Daniels bottles, 2 deep in some places, as Bert always did enjoy a party. Good house, good friends and good times."
There are plenty of other photos online.
^^^
Topanga Canyon was pretty wild in the late '60s and '70s. A hippie haven. Could live cheaply there and "off the grid" until gentrification hit in the '80s. Malibu spillover. The shacks & houses along the creek were often flooded during winter storms. One of the rainier spots near L.A., averages over 24 inches per year near the top.

Last edited by CaliNative; Nov 24, 2019 at 12:21 AM.
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