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Old Posted Feb 19, 2007, 10:20 PM
scottlag84 scottlag84 is offline
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U.S. contemporary architecture?

I'm an architecture student in a masters program at NC State in Raleigh. I've worked briefly in the "real world" and have seen a wide spectrum of projects. I understand that cities in the US look different than that of Europe, but I was wondering what cities had the most current/cutting edge architecture in the US? Are there any experiencing development similar to anywhere in Europe? I'm particularly intrigued by many projects in the Netherlands and Germany. Any thoughts?
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Old Posted Feb 19, 2007, 10:34 PM
DJM19 DJM19 is offline
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I dunno...I live in LA, so I know it pretty well, and its certainly abundant with...interesting architecture.
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Old Posted Feb 19, 2007, 10:48 PM
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i found europe more willing to experiment where as american architects like to stick with "safe" and familiar designs.
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Old Posted Feb 19, 2007, 11:29 PM
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Chicago seems to be getting back to its progressive architectural history. There's certainly more public support for cutting edge architecture there than in many other US cities. For the most part though municipal zoning laws really hamper cutting edge development in the US. You'd have to look to a place like Vegas for something truly unique.
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Old Posted Feb 20, 2007, 5:19 AM
MidtownMile MidtownMile is offline
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I think, like the country itself, America is known more for its mixture of elements. Of course cities like Chicago and New York have great examples of very modern approaches, but almost any major city has its own icons.

I'll put a small plug in for Atlanta, but a large part of that is simply how new the city is. Its skylines are looking more and more modern, but it has the benefit of simply not having a lot of old buildings to "dilute" the glass towers.

I also agree that America has tended toward the safe or the iconic, but I think that is changing. Some of the new mixtures of steel and glass into organic forms are just stunning.
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  #6  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2007, 7:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcu View Post
Chicago seems to be getting back to its progressive architectural history. There's certainly more public support for cutting edge architecture there than in many other US cities. For the most part though municipal zoning laws really hamper cutting edge development in the US. You'd have to look to a place like Vegas for something truly unique.
Vegas is unique, but I wouldnt call it contemporary. In fact it almost always tries to fake other, older architecture.
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  #7  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2007, 7:33 AM
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We are currently seeing a major architectural change in the U.S., one that favors more contemporary architecture. Go to any large city and look at the new towers, midrises, and new cultural institutions like theatres and museums and what do you see? Lots of glass, clean lines, minimalist facades, either colorful or solid color, good urban/site design features, etc.

Regionalism is a big part of American architecture though and it's interesting to see that blend in with general contemporary design. For example the "contemporary" midrises going up in Seattle look a lot different than the ones in Chicago, Atlanta, or Miami.
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Old Posted Feb 20, 2007, 6:17 PM
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A lot of crap is erected in NYC but there are also some really cutting-edge buildings that have either gone up recently (Hearst and InterActiveCorp) or about to (Gehry's Atlantic Yards and the new WTC buildings).
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  #9  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2007, 6:47 PM
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As mentioned above NYC has some built cutting edge architecture, with much more either underconstruction or proposed, such as Beekman Place in Lower Manhattan which is underconstruction and will be the world's first built, real, Gehry skyscraper.

Built:

Trump World Tower:


Hearst Tower:


The triplet Charles Street Towers:


LVMH Tower:


Blue Condo:


IAC:
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  #10  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2007, 3:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdawg View Post
A lot of crap is erected in NYC but there are also some really cutting-edge buildings that have either gone up recently (Hearst and InterActiveCorp) or about to (Gehry's Atlantic Yards and the new WTC buildings).
I agree that alot of crap is going up in NYC. Contemporary should not be ugly, but as someone pointed out they would play it safe. Europe contemporary architecture is not all that nice either. Asia is more succesful though.
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  #11  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2007, 7:41 PM
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The major art institutions in Cleveland and northeast Ohio have contracted either expansions or new facilities to some of the most cutting-edge firms. For example, the Akron Art Museum expansion designed by Coop Himmelb(l)au will be their first project on American soil. As you can see the expansion is a radical departure from the historic Italianate style of the original building (on the left).


In Cleveland, the Cleveland Institute of Art has hired MVRDV http://www.mvrdv.nl/_v2/ to coordinate their expansion, and the Museum of Contemporary Art has signed the Foreign Office Architects http://www.f-o-a.net/flash/index.html to design their new facilities. No renderings for these projects yet.

http://www.cleveland.com/entertainme...111.xml&coll=2
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  #12  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2007, 8:08 PM
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The problem I see with a lot of new European architecture is it's weird for the sake of being weird and creative. It often lacks a certain sense of function that makes buildings like the John Hancock in Chicago so great. The US though seems to have gone through the other extreme the last couple of decades. It seems like the two are starting to merge. It'll be interesting to see what happens.
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  #13  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2007, 6:29 AM
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surely you agree with me
 
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yummy!

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