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  #21  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 8:19 PM
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Originally Posted by ArchWatcher View Post
Or 1952 CE Where is this?
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  #22  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 9:58 PM
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"Some believe that a mysterious stone tower in Newport, RI, is the oldest building in America, built by the Vikings around AD 1050. Most academics think that it was built by a Colonial farmer, or by refugees of a Chinese treasure ship, but since no records exist, how do they know? "
A Norse settlement that lasted long enough to build that (which, btw doesn't at all resemble any buildings from that time in Iceland/Greenland) would have been mentioned in the sagas about Vinland. So... that'd be a no.
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  #23  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2007, 12:44 AM
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In North America north of Mexico the oldest surviving buildings probably occur in the southwestern U.S. as Anatazi or similar culture dwellings and ceremonial centers. Elsewhere the oldest surviving "building" , if you can call them that, are Mississipian earthen platform mounds. The most noted of which are at the Cahokia World Hertitage Site near Collinsville, Illinois where the platform top pyrimid mound's construction period date to around 1000CE and are among the largest of their kind in the world. Elsewhere in middle N America , earthen burial and eiffgy mounds are considerably older.

As far as I know the oldest surviving man made "structures" in the America's may be stone cobble fish wiers (dams). Many examples of which survive in North America's Great Lakes region. Although reliable dates are lacking for their initial construction the earliest probably date to the Early to Middle Archaic Tradition appromixately 4,000 to 8,000 years BP. They were still used by Native Americans and early commerial fisherman in the 19th century CE.
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  #24  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2007, 6:58 PM
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is this considered intact?



dated to about 3100 BC
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  #25  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2007, 9:42 AM
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Not the oldest buildings in the world, but possibly the oldest intact wooden buildings in the world are these two here:



They date from either 607 AD or around 700 AD, depending on if there was or was not a fire in 670. They were repaired in 1374 and 1603 though, so the majority of it is not the original material.
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  #26  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2007, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Swede View Post
A Norse settlement that lasted long enough to build that (which, btw doesn't at all resemble any buildings from that time in Iceland/Greenland) would have been mentioned in the sagas about Vinland. So... that'd be a no.
If they made it back home, yes.
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  #27  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2007, 1:35 AM
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some think this underwater pyramid in japan is the oldest man made structure.
I've watched a documentary on this location and many people think it's actually a natural formation and has not been altered by man in any way. There are a number of locations where the actions of waves and other natural phenomenon do tend to shape rock into formations with straight lines and other features that often appear as man made but in fact they are not. We would need some evidence such as tool marks to show that this is indeed a man made site.
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  #28  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2007, 7:24 AM
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One of the oldest public buildings from c125:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pantheon%2C_Rome











Last edited by kalmia; Feb 4, 2007 at 7:30 AM. Reason: fixed image link
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  #29  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2007, 7:26 AM
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^^^^ Yup, concrete can last a long time.
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  #30  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2007, 3:25 PM
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This and the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul are among my favorites. That they are the best preserved of Roman buildings is no coincidence. While most others were uncerimoniously dismantled as building material for lesser successors, the Pantheon and Hagia Sophia were protected as churches and saved the fate of the midevil "wrecking ball".
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  #31  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2007, 9:11 PM
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Originally Posted by X-fib View Post
In North America north of Mexico the oldest surviving buildings probably occur in the southwestern U.S. as Anatazi or similar culture dwellings and ceremonial centers. Elsewhere the oldest surviving "building" , if you can call them that, are Mississipian earthen platform mounds. The most noted of which are at the Cahokia World Hertitage Site near Collinsville, Illinois where the platform top pyrimid mound's construction period date to around 1000CE and are among the largest of their kind in the world. Elsewhere in middle N America , earthen burial and eiffgy mounds are considerably older.

As far as I know the oldest surviving man made "structures" in the America's may be stone cobble fish wiers (dams). Many examples of which survive in North America's Great Lakes region. Although reliable dates are lacking for their initial construction the earliest probably date to the Early to Middle Archaic Tradition appromixately 4,000 to 8,000 years BP. They were still used by Native Americans and early commerial fisherman in the 19th century CE.
my imagination just exploded
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  #32  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2007, 9:30 PM
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petra was roman....most of greece and all of egypt is far older...http://www.morien-institute.org/yonaguni.html
Ummm...Petra is not Roman. It was built by the Nabataeans, Arabic-speaking Semites, who learned to build dams, conduits and cisterns and then sold the water to those frequenting the myriad trade routes in the area. Still, you're right that it's not *that* old ;-)
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  #33  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2007, 10:49 PM
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If they made it back home, yes.
Can't argue with that, an expedition that left and no word was heard of it after would probably not merit a mention in a saga written a century or two later.
But still, the architecture is all wrong. Just like the style is wrong with the runestones found in Minnesota.

What is left of the Greenland settlements' largest buildings:




Icelandic architecture at the time:

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  #34  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2007, 12:46 AM
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There is widely accepted archeological evidence of a Viking settlement in the New World at L'Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland, Canada. As far as I know, not anywhere else. Claims of Vikings in Minnesota have been dismissed as hoaxes.
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  #35  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2007, 10:18 AM
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^That would be my point, yes
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  #36  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2007, 2:48 PM
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so are we any closer?

hagar qim in malta?



newgrange in ireland?

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  #37  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2007, 12:54 AM
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Now thats more like it!
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  #38  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2007, 10:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Swede View Post
Icelandic architecture at the time:

^ Wow, talk about green roof environmentalism. Modern builders perhaps tout their own novelty incorporating them into their designs, but this clearly shows otherwise.

Many of the responses have been quite interesting. This is one of the situations where exploring the question unveils more intrigue than finding the true answer ever would.
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  #39  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2007, 11:14 PM
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^It wasn't by choice, that style. They'd already clear-cut practically the whole island by then. Wood being a rare commodity makes for interesting architecture.
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