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  #5801  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2019, 9:05 AM
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Salt Lake City & MSA/CSA Rundown


Holiday Metroscape



Downtown Christmas Magic At The City Creek Center


Sundance Holiday Vacation - Southern Metro

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/


Park City's Old Main - Central Metro/East

By B. Crockett


Snowbird Ski Resort - Central Metro

http://speidelsadventures.blogspot.c...-snowbird.html



Christmas Pageantry on a grand scale, performed in the structural and acoustical marvel that is Downtown's 23,000 seat Conference Center Main Hall.


Snowbasin Ski Resort - Northern Metro


Downtown - Regent Street Plaza


Downtown Adj. - Construction Updates Salt Lake City International Airport



October 3rd - November 27, 2019

- Continued work on two 76-foot tall helices on the south side of the Parking Garage



- Started installing terrazzo, ceiling tiles and column covers in the North Concourse-West

- Finished apron paving around the South Concourse-West in preparation for a hard stand operation

- Began asphalt paving on in-bound elevated roadway

- Began the curbside baggage handler system installation



- Placed initial ticket counters in the Central Terminal, 3rd level

- Installed ceiling tiles in the South Concourse-West gate hold areas

- Started polishing terrazzo in North Concourse-West

- Installed charging stations on the South Concourse-West for electric vehicles



- Began installing the glass curtain wall on the west portion of the Terminal where Customs and Border Protection is located

- Completed roofing and glass curtain walls on the North Concourse-West

- Set initial passenger boarding bridges on the North Concourse-West

- Installed way-finding signs in the South Concourse-West



- Completed first pour on the Parking Garage East Helix

- Began installing passenger boarding bridges on the south side of the South Concourse-West

- Initiated migration of IT conduit

- Installed carpet and chairs in gate hold rooms A22 and A24 in South Concourse-West



- Began heating the North Concourse interior from the new Central Utility ...Plant

- Placed booths in the parking garage

- Continued preparations for the hardstand operation beginning in ...January

Last edited by delts145; Dec 12, 2019 at 4:59 PM.
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  #5802  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2019, 9:39 AM
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Holiday Shoppers Stroll Along Richards Street In The heart Of Downtown

http://jillthinksdifferent.blogspot.com/2013/12/temple-square-gotta-do-it.html



Update, Downtown Adj. - University Of Utah Stadium Project

‘We’ve got one shot to get this right and that’s our absolute plan’: Utah breaks ground on stadium project
Rice-Eccles getting $80 million in enhancements.

By Dirk Facer Nov 30, 2019, 4:47pm MST


https://www.deseret.com/2019/11/30/2...tadium-project

SALT LAKE CITY — The University of Utah broke ground — albeit in ceremonial fashion — on its new Ken Garff Performance Zone. Dignitaries in hard hats used gold shovels to turn some dirt on the $80 million project that will officially begin in January...When complete in the summer of 2021, the Ken Garff Performance Zone will bring significant enhancements to the stadium. The existing building and stands in the south end zone will be replaced by a structure featuring new locker rooms, meeting spaces and premium seating. It’ll enclose the stadium and raise the capacity for Utah football games from 45,807 to 51,444. Funds for the project are being covered by donations and future revenue streams associated with the new suites, loge boxes, ledge seating, stadium club, field-level club, rooftop terrace, and benches. The zone will also include sports medicine and hospitality areas, as well as spaces for equipment, media, and a recruiting lounge. Harlan said it will be one of the best facilities in the country when completed.

University members and donating families participate in the groundbreaking ceremony for the new Ken Garff Performance Zone before the start of an NCAA football game
between the Utah Utes and Colorado Buffaloes at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Nov. 30, 2019. Colter Peterson, Deseret News



https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/WAzl...in_27345.0.jpg


Picture By Jeffrey D. Allred , The Deseret News - The current configuration of the University of Utah's Rice-Eccles Stadium is pictured.




Rederings, newly expanded stadium












A few new renderings from this link: https://www.kengarffperformancezone.com/[/B]






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Last edited by delts145; Dec 1, 2019 at 12:27 PM.
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  #5803  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2019, 11:01 AM
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Northern Metro - Snowbasin Ski Resort


Northern Metro Resorts - New Hotel/Condo Building For Powder Mountain

The Ogden Valley Planning Commission recently approved a 5-story property at Summit Powder Mountain Resort to include a 47-room Selina branded hotel and 52 condominium units. No renderings were included in the news article or the board meeting packet.

Quote:
In other action Tuesday, the planning commission approved the design review application for the proposed Powder Mountain hotel, to be developed by Greenline Capital as part of the Selina chain of hotels, hostels and co-working spaces. The five-story structure, sitting on about a half-acre of land, would house 47 hotel rooms and 52 condominium units and feature a “Scandinavian look,” according to Rory Murphy, presenting the proposal to the commission on Tuesday on behalf of Greenline and Powder Mountain.

He described it as a “destination hotel” that would be a “significant tax generator” for Weber County. The facility would create 51 jobs.

“Perhaps most importantly, it provides vitality and vibrancy to the entire resort area and really begins to anchor a village core that should be a significant economic development area for Weber County for years to come,” reads the application for the hotel. Boosters envision the hotel, the application continues, as “a source of community energy and a gathering space that helps to propel the Village and the mountain in general forward in a positive and fiscally responsible manner.”


-Ogden Standard Examiner



Example of Scandia design trends at Powder Mountain

https://www.powdermountain.com/image...omesite-75.jpg


Architectural Digest -
Powder Mountain Is the Hottest Design Destination You Probably Haven't Heard Of


This hidden gem of a ski resort in Utah is fast becoming a progressive alpine mecca

Architectural Digest - By Meaghan O'Neill - https://www.architecturaldigest.com/...owder-mountain

Just an hour north of Salt Lake City, Powder Mountain is a hidden gem among Utah's more famous ski resorts. At 10,000 acres, it's one of our nation's largest ski areas, and now the mountain's newest owners—a group of young tech entrepreneurs—have begun construction on a contemporary alpine village that's attracting big money and bold-face names (think Richard Branson and Tim Ferriss). With buildings by acclaimed architects like Marmol Radziner, Olson Kundig, and MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects, the Summit Powder Mountain village promises sprawling views of the Great Salt Lake and a stunning organic modern aesthetic.

Die-hard skiers have been enjoying Powder Mountain's exceptional terrain for decades, but the new village, which is expected to be operational by 2022, aims to attract a year-round community of thought leaders—from artists and activists to scientists—who will rub elbows at yoga studios and juice bars in a Burning-Man-meets-Davos type of atmosphere. To help build this kind of place, designers are held to strict guidelines that aim to thwart overdevelopment. For example, houses must remain under 4,500 square feet (an additional 1,000 square feet of living space is allowed underground), prioritize natural materials, and be energy efficient. In all, 500 mountain homes will be built, clustered around a village center with restaurants, spas, a hotel, shops, and public art—all easily accessed by ski lift, hiking, and mountain biking trails.

“All of our design guidelines were developed to not disrupt the soil,” says Brian Williams, director of real estate for Powder Mountain. Approximately 2,600 acres were earmarked for development; of that, several will be granted to a local land trust as preserved space that will be open to the public.

“While the value of mountain homes typically relies solely on sheer scale, [we] are working to provide a new standard for the valuation of homes,” says Anne Mooney, principal architect at Sparano + Mooney Architecture, which has provided site analysis as well as a conceptual design for a net-zero energy lodge, no easy task in Utah's harsh winters. To create that kind of shift, Summit—and the people who will call it home—must place worth on quality, sustainability, and durability, says Mooney, whose firm has an office in Salt Lake City.


Twenty-six modern cabins, an event center, and a lodge will make up the Horizon neighborhood, which was designed by MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Clad in cedar siding, the buildings are reminiscent of local barns. Rendering by MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects

https://media.architecturaldigest.co...e_20170118.jpg


Powder Mountain, The Horizon Neighborhood - Completed Cottage Designs



https://images.adsttc.com/media/imag...jpg?1557799116


https://images.adsttc.com/media/imag...jpg?1557798800


https://images.adsttc.com/media/imag...jpg?1557799023


https://images.adsttc.com/media/imag...jpg?1557798555


https://images.adsttc.com/media/imag...jpg?1557798731


https://images.adsttc.com/media/imag...jpg?1557799049


https://images.adsttc.com/media/imag...jpg?1557798950

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Last edited by delts145; Dec 25, 2019 at 11:35 AM.
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  #5804  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2019, 1:54 PM
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Downtown Update - Renovation Of Historic Kearns Building Nearing Completion

Quote:
Originally Posted by Makid View Post

The historic Kearns Building on Salt Lake City’s Main Street gets a $25 million renovation

https://www.sltrib.com/news/2019/11/...rousel-8008547
The historic Kearns Building in downtown Salt Lake City holds a special place for its owner — in more ways than one.

Hines, the global real estate firm, bought the 10-story building at 136 S. Main St. in 1988. Constructed in 1911, the steel-reinforced concrete structure with a white terra cotta facade was among the first-ever purchased by the Houston-based company.

Three decades later, Hines is one of the world’s largest privately held real estate powerhouses, overseeing a global portfolio worth some $120 billion.

The firm recently announced it has embarked on a $25 million overhaul of the Kearns Building’s interior and its electrical, plumbing and other support systems — a testament, one official said, to its enduring commitment to the city’s downtown.



Pictured, The Historic Kearns Building currently undergoing renovations. If you are facing the Kearns Building and to the immediate left, Global Developer Hines will soon begin construction on their new Pantages Tower Project.

“As you can imagine, owning this building for 30 years, we’re quite interested in Main Street and how everything goes here,” said Dusty Harris, Hines’ senior managing director in Salt Lake City.

The Kearns Building and its renovation hold a special place for Hines in another sense. Owning Kearns, it turns out, has given Hines the inside track to reimagine the aging Utah Theater next door, which the city now owns.

Details of the renovation were released simultaneous to news that Hines and Utah-based LaSalle had clinched a deal with the city to buy the historic theater — located just to the south of the Kearns Building on Main Street— with plans to tear down the 101-year-old venue and build a skyscraper.

Under a little-known provision that lets the city’s Redevelopment Agency give preference to adjacent property owners as it seeks to develop its landholdings, Hines and LaSalle — which owns 160 S. Main, just south of the theater — have been in exclusive talks with the city for more than three years.

Now, with a sales agreement penned by Mayor Jackie Biskupski in early November, the developers are poised to buy the aging venue, demolish it and build a 30-story, glass-clad tower in its place.

Though LaSalle has developed several popular restaurants in Salt Lake City, the skyscraper would be Hines’ first major project in Utah’s capital.

The prospect of razing the Utah Theater has upset supporters of the historic performance hall, who have accused the mayor and officials with the RDA of not adequately involving the public as it has decided the building’s fate.

The RDA has estimated the costs of refurbishing the Utah Theater at between $45 million and $60 million — an amount Biskupski has deemed beyond the city’s budget without asking taxpayers for more money, something she’s not willing to do.

Harris said that during Hines early involvement with the Utah Theater project, “we spent all our time trying to save the theater.” He said the company now supports the decision by the mayor and RDA “to move in a different direction.”

As that project starts to ramp up, Hines will be putting the finishing touches on the three-month Kearns Building renovation, which is set to be completed by year’s end.



The office building, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982, was designed by California architects, reportedly using aspects of the style of Louis Sullivan, dubbed by one biographer as the “father of skyscrapers.”

The Main Street structure is seen as one of the best-preserved examples of that architectural approach in the Intermountain West, according to its original application for National Register status.

Much of the current renovation work — designed by the Salt Lake City firm HKS Architects — is based on original historic 1909 drawings, the owners say.

Designers and Utah artists have also drawn from anecdotes from the life of the building’s creator, Thomas Kearns, a wealthy mining executive, onetime U.S. senator for Utah and part owner in The Salt Lake Tribune.

The renovation has already created a new interior courtyard and artists are finishing a three-story, open-air mural above it, featuring Helen Kearns, the former senator’s youngest daughter.

“We’ve been working on this for a long time,” said Daniel Stephens, a Hines executive involved in the project.

Crews are retrofitting and modernizing much of the building’s 166,939 square feet of office spaces, creating new light-filled common areas and spreading new Utah artwork installations throughout.

On some floors, the overhaul is creating new windows and exposing brick walls and steel girders to give office spaces a popular vintage feel. Harris said Hines is hoping the renovation, which also includes opening a newly remodeled coworking space, will help lure high-tech companies as tenants.

Hines and LaSalle, meanwhile, have submitted initial plans for the residential skyscraper on the Utah Theater site, with 300 or so apartments and new a midblock walkway cutting westward from Main Street.

If the project goes ahead, the 30-story tower would rank among the city’s top five tallest buildings — but that lineup is changing fast.

The proposed skyscraper is one of at least half-dozen new and tall towers now being pursued in Utah’s capital amid a spurt of commercial and residential construction.

Hines, which also owns the Cottonwood Corporate Center in Cottonwood Heights, announced in March that it had purchased a 49.5-acre property in West Valley City with plans to build a four-building, 727,000-square-foot logistics park.

That industrial project has been billed as Hines’ first major development deal in the Utah market.



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Last edited by delts145; Dec 2, 2019 at 3:09 PM.
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  #5805  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2019, 2:59 PM
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Downtown Update - Major Global Developer Narrows In On Pantages Tower Proposal


Tony Semarad - The Salt Lake Tribune - https://www.sltrib.com/news/2019/08/...ed-too-costly/



Update - December 1st

Quote:
Originally Posted by Makid View Post
It does appear that the Utah Theater is going away and I would expect that Hines would like to start work on the Pantages Tower as quickly as possible, probably shortly after they complete the renovations and upgrades to the Kearns Building (3 months or so).

I think LaSalle has had their tenants on shorter leases in anticipation of action as well. This would allow the project to move quickly.













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Last edited by delts145; Dec 14, 2019 at 12:21 PM.
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  #5806  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2019, 8:08 PM
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Pantages is very nice proposal. Hope you get it. Those views from those cabins? If everyone had a view like that there'd be a lot less strife and stress in the world. It's heavenly.
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  #5807  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2019, 10:16 PM
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You're right about the views and they're pretty common to come by along the Salt Lake City CSA.

Last edited by delts145; Dec 5, 2019 at 9:35 AM.
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  #5808  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2019, 9:37 AM
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Downtown Update - Block 67 - Phase I, The West Quarter


Quote:
Originally Posted by meman View Post
Constructiion fencing is going up around the West Quarter site today!!

Looks like another big project is imminent!!
Jacobsen is partnering with The Ritchie Group and Garn Development to build Phase I of The Block 67 Project. The West Quarter, a multi-use development that will help define the emerging sports and entertainment district in downtown Salt Lake City. The project — adjacent to Vivint Smart Home Arena — will feature more than 650 residential units, a mid-block street with access to 200 South and 300 West, and a subterranean parking garage. The scope of work also includes more than 100,000 square feet of retail space, 430,000 square feet of office space and a 271-room hotel.

Phase I, The West Quarter

http://www.jacobsenconstruction.com/...1-1370x580.jpg


Massing depicting Phase II of the Block 67 Project

https://images1.loopnet.com/i2/q_-ca.../112/image.jpg

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Last edited by delts145; Dec 10, 2019 at 11:58 PM.
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  #5809  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2019, 10:37 AM
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Update - Sugar House District - Dixon Place


Quote:
Originally Posted by airhero View Post
December 1st - Lowe seems to be going at a good pace with Dixon Place. Once they got their permit they’ve been moving on it. Excavation is happening quickly.

Isaac Riddle Reporting @ https://www.buildingsaltlake.com/dev...fairmont-park/ Sugar House’s building boom looks like it will hold steady over the next few years, including in the immediate area surrounding the Fairmont S-Line Station. Developers, Lowe Property Group, plan to build Dixon Place, a six-story, 59-unit residential mixed-use development at the southwest corner of Elm Avenue and McClelland Street.

The project will replace a 0.5-acre surface parking lot and will have a mix of one and two bedroom apartments that will range in size from 562 square feet to 1,263 square feet. The development will have five floors of residential above a two story-parking podium with 61 parking stalls. Each unit will have a balcony and floors two through six will be setback at the podium level which will allow for roof decks fronting Elm Avenue and McClelland Street atop the podium.

The two-story lobby and a 1,900-square-foot office will wrap around the parking podium at the ground level. The lobby and office will have a mostly glass, glazed exterior but the residential levels will have an exterior of mostly brick veneer and metal paneling. A fitness center will occupy the second floor directly above a portion of the lobby and will have a similar glass glazing as the ground floor...



Construction site for Dixon Place, now under excavation. Background, The Sugarmont Apt's, under construction.

Photo By Airhero


Rendering of the Dixon Place Apartments as would be seen looking south from McClelland Street. Image courtesy Salt Lake City public documents.


Rendering of the east face of the Dixon Place apartments as designed by MVE+Partners. Image courtesy Salt Lake City public documents.


Aerial rendering of the proposed Fairmont apartments as designed by MVE+Partners. Note the massing image of The Sugarmont across the street. Image courtesy Salt Lake City public documents.


Update - Developers moving forward with new six-story apartment building in Sugar House



Dixon Place, at 1034 E. Elm, in Salt Lake City's Sugar House, will be a 59-unit residential building that continues the neighborhood's fast urbanization. Rendering courtesy of MVE + Partners.

Taylor Anderson Reporting @ https://www.buildingsaltlake.com/dev...n-sugar-house/

Developers started work this week on a 59-unit apartment building that will continue the urbanization of Sugar House, with more nearing completion or on the way in the coming months. The six-story Dixon Place, at 1034 E. Elm Ave., will be the latest building to enclose McClelland Street in one of Salt Lake City’s fastest-changing neighborhoods, which has seen a string of developments that are remaking the area’s fabric...

...Salt Lake City is one of the fastest-growing regions in the U.S. and an extremely promising area for multifamily real estate development,” said Pieter Berger, senior associate partner at MVE + Partners, the firm that designed the Dixon Place. “We are excited to introduce a new design that reflects the rich history and culture of the Sugar House neighborhood while providing the modern features and amenities renters desire.”...



The lobby of Dixon Place, the new building on McClelland Street that will become the headquarters of Lowe Property Group. Dixon Place will also include 59 units of one- and two-bedroom apartments. Rendering courtesy of MVE + Partners.



Last edited by delts145; Dec 5, 2019 at 10:47 AM.
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  #5810  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2019, 10:39 PM
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Downtown - Recently Completed Federal Courthouse


SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - An ultra-contemporary courthouse features a 10-story spiral staircase, UV-filtering glass walls, and frosted, illuminated floors.

Its tenants, neither high-tech engineers nor luxury condominium owners, are moving in this week and deciding where to hang their robes.

Salt Lake City's new $185 million courthouse is “Very, very sleek, very modern,” said Markus Zimmer, former clerk of the court who retired in 2006 and has been involved in the project for about two decades. “From a technological perspective, there’s no comparison.”

The tower with views of the Wasatch Range is next door to the century-old federal courthouse. Equipped with digital monitors at attorneys’ desks and building-wide Wi-Fi, it represents a digital transformation in the legal system.

And it’s designed to awe: A sculpture mimicking a cloud of ice crystals towers above the atrium in a nod to Utah’s singular geography and weather patterns. Each light bulb in the building can be individually programmed...
Read More @ http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...-open-in-utah/


http://www.piscatello.com/wp-content...e_HeroShot.jpg


http://www.gsa.gov/ephox_images/slcC...6391063940.jpg


https://www.thomasphifer.com/uploads...LC-SF-B-12.jpg


http://www.metalocus.es/sites/defaul..._04_2_1280.jpg


https://fetzerwood.com/oak/files/pro...urthouse16.jpg


https://www.bensonglobal.com/wp-cont...e-Footer-1.jpg


https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/...press%2Cformat

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Last edited by delts145; Dec 8, 2019 at 12:32 AM.
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  #5811  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2019, 12:31 AM
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Downtown Update - Iconic Square To Receive Major Renovations


https://www.mormonnewsroom.org/artic...ple-renovation

Current Temple Square setup. Note in upcoming plans how the structures fronting the Temple at the north and south will be demolished and replaced in different positions in their relationship to the Temple itself. The more modern structures that now front the Temple on both sides will be removed and new structures with a more historic vibe will be constructed to the sides of the Temple. This will open up the iconic structures approach. Landscaping and water features will also be redeveloped, again affording the historic Temple improved site lines. Also, a significant part of the redevelopment will be subterranean structures and seismic upgrades.

https://2486634c787a971a3554-d983ce5...a107d70264.jpg

Church President Russell M. Nelson announced the pioneer-era temple will close December 29, 2019, and will remain closed for approximately four years while undergoing a major structural and seismic renovation. The temple is expected to reopen in 2024 with a public open house.

“This project will enhance, refresh, and beautify the temple and its surrounding grounds,” said President Nelson. “Obsolete systems within the building will be replaced. Safety and seismic concerns will be addressed. Accessibility will be enhanced so that members with limited mobility can be better accommodated.”

The surrounding area on Temple Square and the plaza near the Church Office Building will also be affected as existing buildings are demolished and the area undergoes renovation and restoration. The existing annex and temple addition on the north side, which were built in the 1960s to add needed support facilities and more sealing (marriage) rooms, will be demolished and rebuilt.
















What will visits to Temple Square be like during renovation? We now know


Tad Walch - December 4th - Deseret News - https://www.deseret.com/2019/12/4/20...-temple-square

SALT LAKE CITY — When the Salt Lake Temple closes for a major, four-year renovation on Dec. 29, Temple Square won’t.

In fact, Temple Square will remain open 365 days a year and is expected to attract more visitors than ever before as the curious flock to watch the construction and see a new film and exhibits at the Conference Center across the street, officials for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said Wednesday.

The church also released four new renderings on Wednesday of what the temple renovation will look like when it’s done in 2024, but officials focused on the Temple Square visitor experience during a round of interviews with a large media contingent in the square’s South Visitors’ Center.



An artistic rendering of the renovated Creation Room in the Salt Lake Temple. Intellectual Reserve, Inc.


An artistic rendering of the renovated Lower Grand Hall in the Salt Lake Temple. Intellectual Reserve, Inc.


An artistic rendering of the renovated World Room in the Salt Lake Temple. Intellectual Reserve, Inc.


An artistic rendering of the renovated Garden Room in the Salt Lake Temple. Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

They said the Conference Center will be the hub of vibrant, new activity in a new role as a welcome and visitors center.

“It will be unique and engaging and a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” said Tanner Kay, the Temple Square guest experience manager. “The most exciting thing to experience will be to view the temple renovation itself from the vantage point of the balcony and the roof of the Conference Center. You’ll be able to see over all the construction fences right down into the full excavation of the temple.”

Some 5 million people visit Temple Square each year, making it one of Utah’s biggest tourist attractions. The tourist buses that bring many of those visitors to the area now will arrive on the West Temple Street side of the Conference Center block.

They will find a new, 17-minute film about the original construction of the temple and its renovation. In new exhibits in the Conference Center lobbies, they will be able to touch some of the artifacts removed from the temple for the renovation and view some of the temple’s artwork.


“We’ll invite tourists to step right off their buses and off the curb and right into the Conference Center theater to view the orientation film as the way to start their visit,” Kay said. “That’s new. We’ve never had an orientation film on Temple Square before, so we are going to invite all the groups to view the film to start their visit. But guests can choose their own adventure on Temple Square.”

The artifacts and artwork in the exhibits will change and rotate throughout the four-year renovation. Also, the cutaway model of the temple will be relocated from the South Visitors’ Center to the Conference Center balcony lobby, which also will be home to a new statue of Jesus Christ.

A new audio/visual experience will help visitors to the Conference Center auditorium, which seats 21,000 people and features an organ with 7,708 pipes, feel what it’s like to attend...concerts by the Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square...

...Construction viewing areas will be available around the square, too.

“There will be multiple vistas to see what work is going on,” he said. “People will be able to see the deep excavation and the footings and foundations of the temple.”

Roberts is excited to show off the construction site with the Conference Center as a welcome and visitors center.

“It’s going to be absolutely spectacular,” he said. “You’ll have the opportunity to come down, enjoy the temple construction site, walk over and see the foundation of the temple while we’re working on it. No one’s ever had the chance to see that. To construction guys, that’s pretty exciting.”

The remodel has two main purposes.

“First of all, seismic stability in the temple concerns the First Presidency and the Brethren long term. We want to make sure that is protected and it will last,” Roberts said. “Secondly, mechanical, electrical and plumbing is 56 to 65 years old. It needs to be replaced. It needs to be updated.”

The reason the foundation and footings will be exposed is because the major part of the renovation is placing the massive, granite temple — the largest Latter-day Saint temple in the world — on a base isolation system.

“What we’re doing is separating the temple, the foundation, from the earth itself with a mobile, moving base isolation system,” Roberts said. “So we’ve got to go all the way down there. We’re going to save the old footings because they are historic. ... We will brace the temple up on the base isolators and separate it from the ground, in essence ... to allow the temple to float and move during a seismic event at a slower rate to preserve it from damage.”

Roberts said church leaders have been considering the base isolator seismic upgrade for nearly 20 years.

“We now think we have the most up-to-date, proven technology,” he said.

The renderings released Wednesday unveiled another driver in the renovation project — history.

Emily Utt, a church historian, has been working since 2011 on the Salt Lake Temple’s history. She is part of a committee that is working to use the renovation as an opportunity to return the temple closer to its original state.

She has studied hundreds of architectural drawings, layers of paint, the insides of walls, the murals and more.

“We want this building to be safe and functional for the next 100 years, but we also want this building to be beautiful for the next 100 years,” she said. “And because this building is so iconic and so important to the church, we want to honor those who did the original construction. Preserving the building is the very best way we can make this building safe and honor those who came before.

“We hope at the end of this project that if original craftsmen walked through, they would recognize it as their building and say, ‘Oh, I painted that’ or ‘Oh, I put that millwork in.’”



Temple Square Holiday Lights



Last edited by delts145; Dec 8, 2019 at 11:21 AM.
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Old Posted Dec 8, 2019, 10:32 AM
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Downtown Update - 95 So. State


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December 7th - The "BIG POUR" for the Tower 8 foundation is going on right now downtown!!

The steel should be going up soon.

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City Creek Reserve sent out this press release about 95 State (Tower 8)
City Creek Reserve, Inc. Makes It Official:
95 State at City Creek
to be SLC’s Newest Commercial Office Tower


SALT LAKE CITY – City Creek Reserve, Inc. (CCRI) today announced that Salt Lake City’s newest office tower to be constructed on the corner of State Street and 100 South will be named “95 State at City Creek.” The building will be the first high-rise development on State Street in decades.

According to Bruce Lyman, Director of Leasing for CCRI, 95 State’s downtown location and proximity to City Creek Center will offer businesses a compelling new choice for Class-A office space in Salt Lake City.

“95 State at City Creek is designed to appeal to today’s employees,” said Lyman. “Its central location and state-of-the-art amenities are designed to maximize wellness, sustainability and productivity to help our tenants make the most of their workday.”

...The project will include 498,000 square feet of leasable office space and an additional 39,000 square feet of meetinghouse space for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The office tower and meetinghouse will have separate entrances and will be independently operated.

95 State at City Creek will offer office tenants premier amenities such as dedicated executive parking, exercise facilities with daily instructional classes, a private entrance for cyclists with secure bike storage, automated window shading,
and personalized HVAC systems that will allow individuals to control their microclimate.

The building will also feature a 5th-floor garden terrace with 7,000 square feet of landscaping, a lobby with 28-foot floor-to-ceiling glass, on-site restaurant, and a renovated underground pedestrian walkway beneath State Street with direct, protected access to City Creek Center.

95 State at City Creek is designed to be the state’s first WELL Certified building with plans to also qualify for LEED Gold and Wired certifications.

Construction is set to begin this month with completion expected in Fall 2021.

###

Note to reporters: Architectural renderings attached to this email.



Courtesy City Creek Reserve, Inc.


Courtesy City Creek Reserve, Inc.


November 9th






Pics By ScottHarding


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Old Posted Dec 9, 2019, 12:56 PM
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Update, Central Metro - Alta Ski Resort - New Snowpine Lodge, Construction Completed


Looking toward the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon, home to Alta and Snowbird ski resorts. Background, Salt Lake City's Central Metro





At Alta, the old is new — and luxurious




By Lee Benson - The Deseret News - https://www.deseret.com/utah/2019/12...-and-luxurious

ALTA — If you could bring Swen Nielson to the top of Little Cottonwood Canyon and show him that there’s a luxury hotel in the mine building where he used to work, and inside the hotel there’s a fancy restaurant named after him, you could no doubt push him over with a feather.

And not just because he’d be 165 years old. The Snowpine Lodge, located where the blacktop stops at the east end of town, is a testament to resilience and rock-solid foundations — as well as to what a difference $50 million can make.
The oldest and most utilitarian structure in the iconic mining-town-turned-ski-mecca is also the newest and most luxurious. It all dates back to the 1860s, when rich veins of silver gave birth to Alta and its many mines. At the base of two of them, the Bay City and Emma, a one-story headquarters-type building was built out of rock. As the mines played out, by 1878 the structure was turned into a general store and post office. A half-century later, when the Alta Ski Area opened in 1938, it became a public shelter, named the Rock Shelter. In 1941 the shelter was renamed the Snowpine Lodge, and in 1948, a man named Paul Partenheimer took over and put in rooms where people could sleep. Through Alta’s many iterations, through avalanches, fires, the Great Depression, the transition from mining to skiing, the rock building at the top of the road has remained untoppled. Few structures in the state of Utah are older, and none in Little Cottonwood Canyon come even close.
If the rocks could talk, they could tell of the miners who rode the train up Little Cottonwood to go through their doors to get to work; they could tell of the years when the Great Depression shut down the entire town and the general store was locked up from 1929 to 1938; they could tell of the World War II years when the famed U.S. Army 10th Mountain Division trained on Alta’s slopes, with headquarters at the Rock Shelter; they could tell of the decades the Deseret News Ski School, responsible for putting countless thousands of Utahns on skis for the first time, operated out of the Snowpine. Lately, the talk would be of the massive makeover that has taken place since Brent and Meg Pratt became the rock’s owners.



Brent Pratt’s Alta story is not atypical; it is the love story of thousands: Young guy comes to Utah to go to college, in his case BYU, discovers Alta skiing, and can never quite get it out of his system.

When he moved to Maryland and he and Meg started their family, their favorite ski vacations were always back to you know where.

In 2011, after a successful career in real estate development and construction, Brent heard that the Snowpine was going up for sale. He bought it from longtime owner Dwight Janerich before it could even go on the market.

After a couple of halfhearted attempts at renovations, in 2017 Brent and Meg decided to go for broke and devote $50 million to transform the Snowpine from a small economy lodge into the most luxurious property at Alta. Thirty-four rooms became 65 rooms, two levels became six levels, 20,000 square feet became 70,000 square feet.

There are those who have looked askance at the upgrade in a place as tied to tradition and the past as Alta. As travel writer Everett Potter, of Forbes magazine, wrote after the Snowpine’s soft opening in January of 2019: “‘New’ has always been a pejorative term at Alta, as has the word ‘luxury.’”

But Brent and Meg persevered, confident they knew what would fit in at Alta and what wouldn’t. They fired their East Coast designer because her design “looked like a ballroom in Bethesda,” and let their daughter take over. The result, as Hannah Dorff, the Snowpine’s director of sales and marketing, opines: “We’ve brought luxury to Alta in an Alta way.”

In the process, Brent Pratt discovered that his great-great-grandfather, the Swen Nielson mentioned at the top of this column, once worked as a teenager in the Bay City and Emma mines after emigrating to the United States from Sweden.
To pay homage, Brent named the Snowpine’s restaurant Swen’s. In further tribute to the days of yore and ore, he named the hotel’s opulent spa the Stillwell Spa, after J.C. Stillwell, the man who managed the Bay City and Emma mines and later ran the general store. The rock walls in the spa’s relaxation room are the very same that lined his store. Where you could once buy a pickax and hardtack, you can now get a “Lustrous Age Defying” facial and a “Mountain Bliss” Swedish massage.

To push J.C. over, you wouldn’t need the feather.



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Old Posted Dec 9, 2019, 1:44 PM
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  #5816  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2019, 12:03 PM
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Central Metro/East - Park City's Latest Addition, A Mountain of Potential and a New Portal to Deer Valley



New Utah resort master-plan envisioning and placemaking by OZ includes landmark conference hotel with world-class skiing and a unique military tie-in

If all goes according to plan, the Mayflower Mountain Resort in Utah’s Wasatch Range will mark two important milestones when it opens, as the first new full-service ski resort built from the ground, up, in the United States in more than three decades, and as the first resort for Air Force members and their families.

The planned Mayflower Mountain Resort, located along US Highway 40 near the Jordanelle Reservoir and iconic Deer Valley Resort outside Park City, is expected to open sometime in 2022, on a property anchored by a 388-room conference hotel designed by OZ Architecture, which also was involved in the envisioning, placemaking and master-planning of the resort. New York City-based EXTELL Development is developing the resort in partnership with the Military Installation Development Authority (MIDA).

Built near the site of the old Mayflower Mine, which until 1969 yielded gold, silver and lead, the 5,600-acre Mayflower Mountain resort will feature a day lodge, full skier services, condos, single-family homes, and townhomes (including workforce housing), plus a huge 60,000-foot recreation center, a range of retail, food and beverage options and other guest amenities, and three hotels, among them the MWR Hotel and Conference Center at Mayflower (MWR is military terminology for morale, welfare and recreation services).

“This is a once-in-a-career opportunity to be part of the initial envisioning, placemaking, master planning and execution of a ground-up resort in Utah. Since the 1980’s there have not been any new ski resorts built in the US,” said Rebecca Stone, Principal and Resort and Hospitality Leader at OZ Architecture. “It is also an opportunity to help the environment because the Mayflower Mine will be cleaned as part of the masterplan, and to give back to the Air Force families that do so much for our country. There are so many exciting layers to this development. We are very excited to be part of the team.”


The eight-story, 616,000-square-foot MWR at Mayflower includes special accommodations and a variety of features tailored specifically to armed forces personnel on R&R, including:

• a block of 100 rooms allocated to military members and discounted based on rank (the lower the rank, the lower the rate).

• a military-only concierge/lounge.

• discounts for military members and their families on lift tickets and activities, and

• design features and functionalities to provide a heightened level of accessibility and inclusiveness (accommodations for service animals, for example).

The amenity-rich MWR conference hotel also includes an inviting lobby to serve as the hotel’s living room, plus an outdoor pool, 50,000 sq. ft. of conference space, a fitness center, underground parking, a signature restaurant with outdoor dining, retail, a coffee shop, bar and kids’ area. For skiers, there’s a ski valet and ski lockers. Capping it all is a rooftop plaza (with views to the Jordanelle Reservoir) for special events, lounging and stargazing.

Designed in a “mountain modern” vein, the OZ concept for the conference hotel draws heavily from the mining history of the site and from the surrounding Wasatch landscape, incorporating a mix of materials, including metals and stone, with large expanses of glass to capture the views and natural light . A series of unique “mineral boxes” provides accents within some of the most vibrant areas of the hotel, and stone wraps the base of the building, grounding it to its mountainside setting. There’s also a wealth of outdoor space, including multiple terraces (with firepits) and lawn space to encourage gathering, and several hot tubs surrounding the outdoor pool.

As for skiing and other activities at the resort, the Mayflower Mountain Resort site is convenient — only about a 40-minute drive from Salt Lake City’s airport. EXTELL and Deer Valley ownership are still discussing how the new and existing ski areas would be linked, and whether Mayflower would ultimately function as a stand-alone resort or as another base area and de facto eastern portal for Deer Valley. Plans for the new resort call for a large ski beach and a base area with accommodations, restaurants, bars, retail shops and skier services, including rentals, lessons and daycare. But there will be plenty else to do at Mayflower beyond snow-riding, including ice skating, mountain biking, wildlife tours, and outdoor concerts.

It all comes together within a pedestrian-friendly community master-planned and envisioned by OZ Architecture Principals Rebecca Stone, Dan Miller and Andy White, in partnership with EXTELL and Langvardt Design Group out of Salt Lake City.

For military personnel, and for pretty much anyone seeking R&R or outdoor adventure, there will be no shortage of MWR — morale, welfare and recreation — at Mayflower Mountain Resort.

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  #5817  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2019, 11:33 PM
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Downtown Update - Block 67 - Phase I, The West Quarter



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December 10th - There was a backhoe at Block 67 today, ripping up concrete and demolishing the parking lot gate booths.

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December 5th - Constructiion fencing is going up around the West Quarter site today!!

Looks like another big project is imminent!!
Jacobsen is partnering with The Ritchie Group and Garn Development to build Phase I of The Block 67 Project. The West Quarter, a multi-use development that will help define the emerging sports and entertainment district in downtown Salt Lake City. The project — adjacent to Vivint Smart Home Arena — will feature more than 650 residential units, a mid-block street with access to 200 South and 300 West, and a subterranean parking garage. The scope of work also includes more than 100,000 square feet of retail space, 430,000 square feet of office space and a 271-room hotel.

Phase I, The West Quarter

http://www.jacobsenconstruction.com/...1-1370x580.jpg


Massing depicting Phase II of the Block 67 Project

https://images1.loopnet.com/i2/q_-ca.../112/image.jpg

Last edited by delts145; Dec 13, 2019 at 11:38 AM.
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  #5818  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2019, 12:11 AM
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Salt Lake City Is Thinking Big To Keep Pace With Growth


Editor's Pick - December 10, 2019 - Brenda Richardson, Senior Contributor Real Estate


Salt Lake City is flourishing in innovation and growth while nurturing an entrepreneurial environment and economic development. The capital of Utah has been busy with a massive expansion of its airport, reinvigorating its downtown and experiencing a building boom. With that growth come challenges and phenomenal opportunities. Salt Lake is the most populous municipality in Utah and core of the greater Wasatch Front metropolitan area, which has a combined population of aproximately 2,600,000 residents.

“The population has been growing at a fast pace,” said Jacob Maxwell, workforce development manager at Salt Lake’s Department of Economic Development. “The business-friendly climate and corporate tax rates bring a lot of business here, so it brings a lot of opportunity, which has caused our unemployment to be so low. And we create a lot of jobs and a lot of job availability here.” Much attention has been paid to the Salt Lake City metro area, but that’s not the only place where the city is thriving. Thanks to the surge in development, people are moving downtown and looking for options to live, work and play. Local leaders are focusing on smart growth to reduce traffic, pollution and commute times. The city offers a variety of public transit options operated by the Utah Transit Authority.

A new performing arts center is reinvigorating the downtown and civic pride. The Eccles Theater has received unprecedented attendance since it opened in 2016. Ballet, musicals, drama, comedy, lectures and music flourish at the performing arts and rental venue, according to artsaltlake.org.

“We can now book large extended stay Broadway shows there,” said Maxwell. “Our government actually pays for much of the performing arts infrastructure. There are ticket sales, but those ticket sales by far do not cover the costs to deliver those services, so it’s a huge amenity that other cities don’t typically offer.”

City Creek Center, the retail centerpiece of one of the nation's largest mixed-use downtown redevelopment projects, is in the heart of the city. The unique shopping environment features a retractable glass roof, a creek that runs through the property, a pedestrian skybridge and more. The world-class fashion and dining destination offers over 100 stores and restaurants including Nordstrom, Macy's, Tiffany & Co., Michael Kors, Coach and Texas de Brazil Churrascaria in a casual pedestrian-friendly environment.

Salt Lake City takes its food scene seriously with more than 2,000 restaurants that run the gamut from national fast-food chains to independent fine dining establishments. “We do have a great food scene, including breweries and distilleries,” said Maxwell. “We have 13 breweries in Salt Lake City alone.”

Dee Brewer, executive director of Downtown Alliance, a nonprofit organization in Salt Lake City that supports many of the businesses, organizations and events that occur downtown, said the nighttime economy is “an important part of the ecosystem” that is growing in Salt Lake City. He noted that when he moved back to Salt Lake City in the early 2000s, Main Street was very different than it is today. “It’s like night and day,” he said. “There were a lot of vacant stores on main street, a lot of empty shops. Now they are full of stores, art, venues, bars, restaurants, and you drive around at night and it’s just a hive of activity. It really demonstrates the health and vibrancy of our downtown community.”

Derek Miller, president and CEO of the Salt Lake Chamber and Downtown Alliance, said the business association has been working harder to keep pace with the continued growth and upcoming projects. “We’ve added 2,000 new residents to the central business district downtown since 2011, and we are on track to add 2,000 more in just the next year alone,” he said. “Growth and everything that comes with it is our number one challenge.”

Brewer pointed out the city is experiencing a tech boom. “We currently have about 77,000 employees on a daily basis in Salt Lake City. Many of them live and work downtown, but many of them come in to downtown.”

He added, “On the tech side, we have just under a hundred tech companies that are located in our downtown area, and that brings a lot of highly educated and young talented workforce. The median working age in Salt Lake City is just 33 years old.”

Salt Lake is home to several financial services companies, including Goldman Sachs, Wells Fargo, JPMorgan Chase and Fidelity Investments. The city is focusing on long-term resilience as it navigates its way through maintaining competitiveness. Robust job and population growth over the past several years have helped sustain elevated levels of new multifamily construction.

Maxwell said Salt Lake is not concerned about who will fill the gap if and when Baby Boomers exit the workforce. “If there’s one thing Utah is really good at, it is having kids, so our population pyramid is very strong,” he said. “We have a lot of young people at the base, a disproportionate amount of young people who can eventually fill the vacancies left by those exiting the workforce, right here, homegrown. We don’t have to rely as heavily on in-migration. We really have a lot of people here, so tapping into that at a state level is hugely important for companies.”

Major projects such as Kensington Tower, a residential high-rise, is under construction, replacing a fast-food restaurant and large parking lot with a 39-story vertical urban community that the developers say will fill the need for high-end rentals. The developer has set sustainable goals for building and construction.

Maxwell said there is demand for multifamily and higher density housing in Salt Lake. “Salt Lake City proper has been leading the way in density,” he said. “Other communities around us have started to try to loosen their zoning to accommodate more density. Utah was originally designed with no intention of having this kind of density, but now with our population growth, we have to confront the fact that we are several units short of multifamily and low-income housing. I believe we have about 3,000 to 5,000 units coming online in the next couple of years. We’re hoping that through our example, other communities around us also will start to adopt more density.”

Salt Lake is seeing more transit-oriented development along the transit line. “We certainly need to see that extend to all parts of the Valley,” said Maxwell. “Right now, there’s a lot of resistance, especially on our east side. It’s resistance to housing density, and it’s generally a height issue with large condo and apartment complexes. People like to preserve their suburban neighborhood feel. People purchase on the east side to have a single-family residential experience, so they are a little resistant to the type of density that the county needs.”

Just minutes from its burgeoning downtown Salt Lake is building what will be the first new hub airport in the country in the 21st century. The airport is expected to secure the city’s position as a global aviation hub that will serve and grow with the region for decades to come. In September 2020, the Salt Lake City Department of Airports plans to open the first phase of the new airport.

Miller said the tremendous growth downtown and in Utah in general means Salt Lake is in “desperate need” of additional housing stock and affordable housing. “Our transit line is a blessing in that regard because affordable housing has been developed along that transit line,” he said. “It helps deliver workers downtown. There are projects planned for affordable housing downtown, but those are limited and will always be limited by the cost of land in the urban core. But they are being built, and there is additional stock being added.”

“Right now we are not in a crisis, but we do have a shortage,” explained Miller. “Housing prices have not turned into something like San Francisco or Seattle. We’re not in that position. And the state is working very hard to ensure that we do not get to that point. There is a huge dialogue around ensuring that we stay ahead of the housing shortage and then trying to work on any types of changes that will help with that. I feel confident that Utah is the kind of state and historically has been the kind of state that promotes collaboration across all sectors and that we will be able to figure that out. That’s one of our biggest traits as well, and I think that’s something that companies report as being a huge asset here. It’s just the spirit of collaboration. Nobody remains siloed. We all come together towards that common cause.”

The convention and meeting business here is significant and material to Salt Lake’s economic performance. “We have about 780,000 visitors for meetings and conventions each year and their spending is significant,” said Brewer. Salt Lake is a venue for the Sundance Film Festival and an independent film community. The 10-day festival spreads out across two other greater metro locations: Park City and the Sundance Mountain Resort near Provo.

The downtown is poised to attract even more visitors with the addition of a huge convention center hotel and other planned full-service hotels in the vicinity. The hotel will be connected to the southeast corner of the Salt Lake Palace Convention Center. “It will be 28 stories with over 700 rooms and 62,000 square feet of meeting space,” said Miller.

Brewer added, “We have a very robust airport, a very robust convention center. The piece we needed to shore up was the hotel rooms. So the addition of the convention center hotel will mean even more large-scale conventions here in the city and more spending. That stimulates the nighttime economy, enables more restaurants and bars, which also becomes a benefit for those recruiting talent to downtown as well.”


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Last edited by delts145; Dec 15, 2019 at 9:37 AM.
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  #5819  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2019, 1:27 PM
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Downtown - New District Attorney Offices



https://www.mhtn.com/mhtn-content/20...SLCo_DA_01.jpg


Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill conducts a tour of the office's new headquarters in Salt Lake City. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News


Photo By Scott G Winterton, Deseret News


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Last edited by delts145; Dec 11, 2019 at 2:58 PM.
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  #5820  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2019, 2:11 PM
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Downtown Update - Hardware District Announces A New Phase Of Construction


Salt Lake Crossing - New micro + studio apartment project to test a new niche in the Downtown market

Luke Garrott Reports - Full Article @ BuildingSaltLake.com - https://www.buildingsaltlake.com/new...YKipqoL-dIwFkk

Salt Lake Crossing, a 300 micro-unit and studio rental building in the Hardware District, is being proposed by the area’s master developer, SALT Development. The Salt Lake Hardware project continues its bold rise between the North Temple Bridge Trax Light Rail/FrontRunner Commuter Rail stop and West High School. SALT’s 4th West, Hardware East and West buildings have added 906 units to the area so far. Three of its planned five buildings are completed and it’s preparing the fourth – with 300 micro and studio-units only...


The workspace and amenity building at Salt Lake Crossing, the Hardware District's new addition, currently in review at SLC Planning. Image courtesy SALT Development.

...The Project

On 1.52 acres, it plans 300 units in a podium + five story building. Half of the units will be micro (228 sf) and half will be studios (470 sf). At 198 units per acre, it is an impressively dense development for the local market.

The new building, designed by local architects Method Studio, is proposing to “face the street” only on the south, one of the short sides of the structure. The south side of the building fronts 200 North and the Hardware West building (with Atlas mural)...



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Last edited by delts145; Dec 12, 2019 at 4:57 PM.
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