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  #1501  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2020, 10:43 PM
cole world11 cole world11 is online now
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From the SABJ today, it appears some airlines are beginning to increase frequencies/resume service to various cities.

American - 2X to ORD, and increases to DFW and PHX staring in July.
Delta - 3X to ATL also in July.
Southwest - Increase in frequencies but doesn't mention to which cities.
Sun County - 2X weekly to MSP later this month.
United - 1X to DEN, IAD, and EWR in July.
Viva Aerobus - New service beginning 2X weekly to MTY in July.

Y'all be safe, cheers!
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  #1502  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2020, 3:45 AM
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https://www.ksat.com/news/local/2020...-destinations/

Link shows the cities which WN, and others, are scheduled to fly to later this year. I'd take the November and December adds with a grain of salt as most airlines in these times are adjusting their schedules less than a month out.

Also noticeably absent is information on Interjet, which had financial problems even before COVID.
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  #1503  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2020, 7:14 PM
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  #1504  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2020, 9:29 PM
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First look: Sundt Construction begins work on $45M Broadway Street reconstruction downtown

By Mitchell Parton – Reporter, San Antonio Business Journal
Aug 6, 2020, 8:22am CDT Updated Aug 6, 2020, 9:01am CDT
A $45 million effort to rebuild central portions of Broadway Street is now underway.
Sundt Construction Inc., based in Tempe, Arizona, said Wednesday that it has started utility work on the first phase of the city bond-funded project. The current portion spans from East Houston Street to I-35.
“We’re excited to continue Sundt’s role in reshaping downtown San Antonio,” Jim O’Reilly, project manager for Sundt, said in a news release. “This project presents some unique obstacles, but our team is up for the challenge.”
The $45 million project includes a complete renovation of the street, including curbs, sidewalks, driveway approaches, traffic signals and drainage improvements. The rehabilitation also includes landscaping, lighting, stormwater runoff management and underground utility upgrades. Completion of this phase is estimated for the fall of 2024.
Los Angeles-based engineering firm AECOM and local landscape architecture firm MP Studio designed the project.
The full scope of improvements to Broadway Street consists of three segments: Houston Street to I-35, I-35 to Mulberry Avenue and Mulberry Avenue to Burr Road. The total project cost across all phases has been appropriated $61 million by the city, with $42 million from the 2017 bond program. Additional funding sources include $6 million from a tax increment reinvestment zone, $6.6 million from San Antonio Water System and $2.8 million from CPS Energy.
Construction firms have not been chosen for the additional portions beyond I-35, which will be done through a bid process, but local firm Pape-Dawson Engineers Inc. has been chosen to provide engineering design services.
Also downtown, Sundt is currently working on the San Pedro Creek Improvements, Canopy by Hilton Downtown San Antonio and just completed construction on the CPS Energy headquarters renovations.






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  #1505  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2020, 10:49 PM
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I see part of the bond is going towards helicoptering in some new historic red brick buildings from New England or somewhere...

edit: I wonder what the Fiesta parade route will be during construction (assuming we ever get to have Fiesta again)?
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  #1506  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2020, 4:29 PM
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Could it be?

Quote:
The $45 million project includes a complete renovation of the street, including curbs, sidewalks, driveway approaches, traffic signals and drainage improvements. The rehabilitation also includes landscaping, lighting, stormwater runoff management and underground utility upgrades.
Woohoo! Buried power lines? We can only hope.
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  #1507  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2020, 5:07 PM
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Glad to see buried power lines! I'm not a fan of eliminating traffic lanes. As much development Broadway is getting, they will need all the lanes they currently have. What is the good of having a beautiful road if it is all congested.
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  #1508  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2020, 11:34 PM
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Glad to see buried power lines! I'm not a fan of eliminating traffic lanes. As much development Broadway is getting, they will need all the lanes they currently have. What is the good of having a beautiful road if it is all congested.
Walkabiliy will be greatly encouraged and downtowns really shouldn't have wide streets. It's not safe for pedestrians. This will make it feel more like a neighborhood.
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  #1509  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2020, 5:12 AM
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Downtown is way overbuilt for freeways. Let people in a hurry use them. Surface streets should be for slower movement.
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  #1510  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2020, 9:54 PM
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Woohoo! Buried power lines? We can only hope.
Well, most power lines are actually already buried on Broadway south of 35. The only lines to bury are the ones on the cross streets I guess.
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  #1511  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2020, 5:14 PM
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Vivaaerobus beginning new nonstop flights to Mexico City starting September 27
Operates Sundays and Thursdays

Departs MEX 6pm gets to SAT 8:30pm
Departs SAT 9:40pm gets to MEX midnight

Believe they've attempted this route before as well, but could be trying to pick up the slack from Interjet who has suspended all flights from SAT.

Aeromexico is also adding a second daily Mexico City flight starting September 12, seems to only be in September though. The second flight operates Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays. Flight goes back to 1x daily beginning in October.
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  #1512  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2020, 7:24 PM
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new article in the Express News today regarding the airport. Mayor calls it like it is. The airport needs a new terminal. Article brings up that cost could be as much as $1 billion. FAA calls SAT a mid-tier airpot...ouch.

https://www.expressnews.com/business...e-15597566.php
-------------------------------------------------------
Mayor Ron Nirenberg says San Antonio International Airport needs to think big and build a new terminal, despite the current plunge in passenger traffic stemming from COVID-19 pandemic.

“For San Antonio’s airport to reflect the big city, tier-one status that we aspire to, we’re going to have to upgrade our facilities and our air service delivery in general,” Nirenberg said.

Airport officials and the mayor-appointed Airport System Development Committee are putting together a 20-year master plan that will in part help determine what to do with the airport’s 36-year-old Terminal A, its main departure and arrival area.

Despite recent renovations that cost more than $30 million, the terminal’s narrow passageways are around half the size of more modern terminals, and can’t be widened. There aren’t enough restrooms, and seating areas near gates aren’t spacious, leading to overcrowding.

The plan also could recommend improvements to airport’s smaller Terminal B, which opened 10 years ago. The facility is already considered outdated, given modern airport design.

The final plan, which will need to be approved by the mayor and city council, has been pushed back to summer 2021. City officials had hoped to approve the plan this summer, but they had to put on hold public hearings necessary to finish the plan due to the pandemic.

The plan is in the works as the airline industry weathers an historic downturn. Like other airports across the US, San Antonio International had seen strong passenger growth in recent years until the pandemic stopped most travelers from flying.

More than 10 million passengers passed through the airport in 2019, up 20 percent from five years ago. Though growth projections for the next two decades were more modest, the case for more gates at the airport was clear.

Now, with the passenger count dropping to less than a third of what it was pre-pandemic, the question is how long it will take the facility to return to 2019 levels.

While it may take several years for passenger air traffic to recover, Nirenberg said, the airport still needs a modern terminal.

“From a customer experience standpoint, people know their airports based on their terminal experience, and right now their terminal experience reflects a mid-tier airport — and that’s not what this city aspires to,” he said.

He said better facilities and air service would create business opportunities for existing companies and those considering relocating to San Antonio.

“It’s essentially the welcome station for the city of San Antonio, it raises the bar to attract businesses,” Nirenberg said.

San Antonio International’s limited non-stop destinations, compared with other airports, have been a detriment for the business community. The issue made headlines when telecommunications giant AT&T announced in 2008 that it was moving its corporate headquarters from San Antonio to Dallas, in part because of the lack of direct flights at the airport.

A new terminal wouldn’t guarantee more non-stop offerings at the airport, Nirenberg said, but it raises the bar.

“One of the questions we have to ask ourselves is what elements do we have some degree of control over?” Nirenberg said, “One of them is ensuring that business travelers or visitors or tourists have a first-class experience in our airport.”

Despite San Antonio’s standing as the seventh largest city in the U.S. — though its metropolitan area ranks 24th largest — the Federal Aviation Administration categorizes the airport as a mid-size facility. The latest FAA date, from 2018, shows that 43 other airports had larger passenger departure counts.

How to pay for future upgrades will be at partly in the hands of Aviation Director Jesus Saenz Jr. He took over early this year after serving as chief operating officer at the Houston Airport System.

Nirenberg said the city hired Saenz in part for his experience with airport renovation projects. Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport opened a new domestic terminal in 2017, and is currently building an international facility.

“That’s one of the strengths that Jesus brings to the table,” Nirenberg said. “He’s done it in every way it can be done, and we need that experience because we need a financing plan, and that’s obviously critical.”

A new terminal could cost as much as $1 billion.

Saenz declined a request for an interview.

In a statement, he said the “data driven” master plan “will allow us to make informed, tactical decisions to determine what we can afford and to prioritize future airport expansion or construction projects — while also taking into account changes in the aviation industry as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

In the past, officials funded renovation projects at San Antonio Airport through a combination of bond financing, rents from airport concessions and user fees on passenger air tickets and rental cars. But revenue has dropped in recent months, with fewer passengers using the airport, making it potentially harder to fund new projects.

The airport’s $79.1 million operating budget for the new budget year, starting on Oct. 1, is $33 million smaller than this year’s, because of the fall-off in revenue from airport concession and parking fees. The airport had to use more than $15 million in federal stimulus money to make up for lost revenue and pay for continuing operations this budget year, Saenz told the City Council on Aug. 26.

Repayment of the $388.4 million in bonds for San Antonio International is also tied to the airport revenue and user fees. Two bond rating agencies, Standard & Poor’s Financial Services and Fitch Ratings, have issued negative outlooks on the debt of the airport, but have not lowered the airport’s bond ratings.

A downgrade would increase the interest rate the airport would have to pay to borrowers for future bond sales.

The newest facility at the airport opened in 2018. The consolidated rent-a-car facility was largely funded with a $123 million bond issue.

John Dickson, co-owner of a San Antonio cybersecurity firm and chairman of the Airport System Development Committee, said the pandemic could impact funding options for a new terminal, with financially struggling airlines likely to balk at higher fees.

“We understand the economic status of the airlines right now, and that is part of our planning process,” Dickson said.

Nirenberg said one of the problems at the airport is that the city previously tried to make upgrades on the cheap.

“The calculus for passenger capacity is changing across the world as a result of the pandemic,” he said. “But what remains the same is that we want to have a 21st century experience in the San Antonio airport, and right now our terminals reflect the kind of penny pinching 1980s and 1990s mindset in which they were largely built.”

New airport terminals across the U.S. have spacious seating, inviting terminals featuring art work and sculpture, and restaurants and other amenities built between gates, so traveler can still keep an eye on their flights.

Dickson said even the newer Terminal B is “antiseptic.”

The terminal was built for $120 million, considered a bare-bones price even a decade ago.

Nirenberg said he wants art, sculpture and restaurants in the airport to reflect San Antonio, so travelers get a sense of place.

“There’s no way to retrofit a mid-tier terminal into a top-tier terminal,” he said. “You just can’t do it. We gotta set ourselves a vision we want to have and go for it.”

Randy Diamond covers tourism and the travel industry. To read more from Randy, become a subscriber. randy.diamond@express-news.net
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  #1513  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2020, 10:37 PM
SAhometown SAhometown is offline
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Originally Posted by Tornado View Post
new article in the Express News today regarding the airport. Mayor calls it like it is. The airport needs a new terminal. Article brings up that cost could be as much as $1 billion. FAA calls SAT a mid-tier airpot...ouch.

https://www.expressnews.com/business...e-15597566.php
-------------------------------------------------------
Mayor Ron Nirenberg says San Antonio International Airport needs to think big and build a new terminal, despite the current plunge in passenger traffic stemming from COVID-19 pandemic.

“For San Antonio’s airport to reflect the big city, tier-one status that we aspire to, we’re going to have to upgrade our facilities and our air service delivery in general,” Nirenberg said.

Airport officials and the mayor-appointed Airport System Development Committee are putting together a 20-year master plan that will in part help determine what to do with the airport’s 36-year-old Terminal A, its main departure and arrival area.

Despite recent renovations that cost more than $30 million, the terminal’s narrow passageways are around half the size of more modern terminals, and can’t be widened. There aren’t enough restrooms, and seating areas near gates aren’t spacious, leading to overcrowding.

The plan also could recommend improvements to airport’s smaller Terminal B, which opened 10 years ago. The facility is already considered outdated, given modern airport design.

The final plan, which will need to be approved by the mayor and city council, has been pushed back to summer 2021. City officials had hoped to approve the plan this summer, but they had to put on hold public hearings necessary to finish the plan due to the pandemic.

The plan is in the works as the airline industry weathers an historic downturn. Like other airports across the US, San Antonio International had seen strong passenger growth in recent years until the pandemic stopped most travelers from flying.

More than 10 million passengers passed through the airport in 2019, up 20 percent from five years ago. Though growth projections for the next two decades were more modest, the case for more gates at the airport was clear.

Now, with the passenger count dropping to less than a third of what it was pre-pandemic, the question is how long it will take the facility to return to 2019 levels.

While it may take several years for passenger air traffic to recover, Nirenberg said, the airport still needs a modern terminal.

“From a customer experience standpoint, people know their airports based on their terminal experience, and right now their terminal experience reflects a mid-tier airport — and that’s not what this city aspires to,” he said.

He said better facilities and air service would create business opportunities for existing companies and those considering relocating to San Antonio.

“It’s essentially the welcome station for the city of San Antonio, it raises the bar to attract businesses,” Nirenberg said.

San Antonio International’s limited non-stop destinations, compared with other airports, have been a detriment for the business community. The issue made headlines when telecommunications giant AT&T announced in 2008 that it was moving its corporate headquarters from San Antonio to Dallas, in part because of the lack of direct flights at the airport.

A new terminal wouldn’t guarantee more non-stop offerings at the airport, Nirenberg said, but it raises the bar.

“One of the questions we have to ask ourselves is what elements do we have some degree of control over?” Nirenberg said, “One of them is ensuring that business travelers or visitors or tourists have a first-class experience in our airport.”

Despite San Antonio’s standing as the seventh largest city in the U.S. — though its metropolitan area ranks 24th largest — the Federal Aviation Administration categorizes the airport as a mid-size facility. The latest FAA date, from 2018, shows that 43 other airports had larger passenger departure counts.

How to pay for future upgrades will be at partly in the hands of Aviation Director Jesus Saenz Jr. He took over early this year after serving as chief operating officer at the Houston Airport System.

Nirenberg said the city hired Saenz in part for his experience with airport renovation projects. Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport opened a new domestic terminal in 2017, and is currently building an international facility.

“That’s one of the strengths that Jesus brings to the table,” Nirenberg said. “He’s done it in every way it can be done, and we need that experience because we need a financing plan, and that’s obviously critical.”

A new terminal could cost as much as $1 billion.

Saenz declined a request for an interview.

In a statement, he said the “data driven” master plan “will allow us to make informed, tactical decisions to determine what we can afford and to prioritize future airport expansion or construction projects — while also taking into account changes in the aviation industry as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

In the past, officials funded renovation projects at San Antonio Airport through a combination of bond financing, rents from airport concessions and user fees on passenger air tickets and rental cars. But revenue has dropped in recent months, with fewer passengers using the airport, making it potentially harder to fund new projects.

The airport’s $79.1 million operating budget for the new budget year, starting on Oct. 1, is $33 million smaller than this year’s, because of the fall-off in revenue from airport concession and parking fees. The airport had to use more than $15 million in federal stimulus money to make up for lost revenue and pay for continuing operations this budget year, Saenz told the City Council on Aug. 26.

Repayment of the $388.4 million in bonds for San Antonio International is also tied to the airport revenue and user fees. Two bond rating agencies, Standard & Poor’s Financial Services and Fitch Ratings, have issued negative outlooks on the debt of the airport, but have not lowered the airport’s bond ratings.

A downgrade would increase the interest rate the airport would have to pay to borrowers for future bond sales.

The newest facility at the airport opened in 2018. The consolidated rent-a-car facility was largely funded with a $123 million bond issue.

John Dickson, co-owner of a San Antonio cybersecurity firm and chairman of the Airport System Development Committee, said the pandemic could impact funding options for a new terminal, with financially struggling airlines likely to balk at higher fees.

“We understand the economic status of the airlines right now, and that is part of our planning process,” Dickson said.

Nirenberg said one of the problems at the airport is that the city previously tried to make upgrades on the cheap.

“The calculus for passenger capacity is changing across the world as a result of the pandemic,” he said. “But what remains the same is that we want to have a 21st century experience in the San Antonio airport, and right now our terminals reflect the kind of penny pinching 1980s and 1990s mindset in which they were largely built.”

New airport terminals across the U.S. have spacious seating, inviting terminals featuring art work and sculpture, and restaurants and other amenities built between gates, so traveler can still keep an eye on their flights.

Dickson said even the newer Terminal B is “antiseptic.”

The terminal was built for $120 million, considered a bare-bones price even a decade ago.

Nirenberg said he wants art, sculpture and restaurants in the airport to reflect San Antonio, so travelers get a sense of place.

“There’s no way to retrofit a mid-tier terminal into a top-tier terminal,” he said. “You just can’t do it. We gotta set ourselves a vision we want to have and go for it.”

Randy Diamond covers tourism and the travel industry. To read more from Randy, become a subscriber. randy.diamond@express-news.net
I wholeheartedly agree! Go big or go home.
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  #1514  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2020, 4:04 AM
Rynetwo Rynetwo is offline
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I’m sorry but flying all around the country I’m not sure what this article is talking about. Do we need a larger airport? Yes!

Are there large comfortable and spacious terminals around? I have not seen them. LAX, SAN, FLL, or MIA are no better. HOU is very nice but they serve 9ish times the passenger count.

Maybe San Antonio needs to talk to NOLA about the airport but they just spent 1.3 billion and they didn’t even try to plan infrastructure to get into the airport.
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  #1515  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2020, 4:17 AM
Keegan-B-SATX Keegan-B-SATX is offline
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Originally Posted by Rynetwo View Post
I’m sorry but flying all around the country I’m not sure what this article is talking about. Do we need a larger airport? Yes!

Are there large comfortable and spacious terminals around? I have not seen them. LAX, SAN, FLL, or MIA are no better. HOU is very nice but they serve 9ish times the passenger count.

Maybe San Antonio needs to talk to NOLA about the airport but they just spent 1.3 billion and they didn’t even try to plan infrastructure to get into the airport.
I agree that San Antonio should study the NOLA new terminal. It's state of the art and has the same qualities our airport should strive for. Hopefully we go big with this project. Nothing is worst than completeing a brand new project only for it to be out of date less than 10 years later.
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  #1516  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2020, 8:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rynetwo View Post
I’m sorry but flying all around the country I’m not sure what this article is talking about. Do we need a larger airport? Yes!

Are there large comfortable and spacious terminals around? I have not seen them. LAX, SAN, FLL, or MIA are no better. HOU is very nice but they serve 9ish times the passenger count.

Maybe San Antonio needs to talk to NOLA about the airport but they just spent 1.3 billion and they didn’t even try to plan infrastructure to get into the airport.


Why you would want to compare SAT to a HUB(IAH) airport? All Hub airports have more passengers flowing through them reconnecting to other destinations, but how many of those passengers actually get off the plane or walk outside the airport? Hub airports will always have higher passenger counts than non hubs. Atlanta's airport has nearly 100 million passengers and it can't all be generated from just the local population.

San Antonio is the most visited city in Texas attracting 38 million annual visitors versus 22 million for Houston. Being a HUB raises a cities profile and definitely brings the best air service and higher passenger activity. Something SAT probably will never achieve if it doesn't think big.

Going on that notion of thinking big, should SAT try to build another airport? I wonder if a San Antonio/Austin airport would ever be a possibility? If that were to ever happen in the future I can see it becoming a hub for a major airliner.

SAT will always be a midsized airport because of its landlocked location and competition with ABIA that draws people from San Antonio. I know this for a fact because I saw an ABIA shuttle bus on I-35 between Shertz and New Braunfels. I've even flown out of ABIA once.

There will be a time when there is 8 million people living along the S.A./Austin corridor and served only by two mid sized airports.

An S.A./Austin airport joint venture would be the epitome of thinking big?
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2018 S. A. Pop.1.51 million
metro 2.5 million/REGION 4.7million
San Antonio economy and largest economic sectors. Annual contribution towards GDP.
U.S. Dept of Defense $48.5 billion/Manufacturing $40.5 billion/Healthcare-Biosciences $40 billion/Finance-Insurance $20 billion/Tourism $15 billion/ Technology $10 billion.

Last edited by Paul in S.A TX; Sep 27, 2020 at 9:37 AM.
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  #1517  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2020, 2:15 PM
Rynetwo Rynetwo is offline
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Originally Posted by Paul in S.A TX View Post
Why you would want to compare SAT to a HUB(IAH) airport? All Hub airports have more passengers flowing through them reconnecting to other destinations, but how many of those passengers actually get off the plane or walk outside the airport? Hub airports will always have higher passenger counts than non hubs. Atlanta's airport has nearly 100 million passengers and it can't all be generated from just the local population.

San Antonio is the most visited city in Texas attracting 38 million annual visitors versus 22 million for Houston. Being a HUB raises a cities profile and definitely brings the best air service and higher passenger activity. Something SAT probably will never achieve if it doesn't think big.

Going on that notion of thinking big, should SAT try to build another airport? I wonder if a San Antonio/Austin airport would ever be a possibility? If that were to ever happen in the future I can see it becoming a hub for a major airliner.

SAT will always be a midsized airport because of its landlocked location and competition with ABIA that draws people from San Antonio. I know this for a fact because I saw an ABIA shuttle bus on I-35 between Shertz and New Braunfels. I've even flown out of ABIA once.

There will be a time when there is 8 million people living along the S.A./Austin corridor and served only by two mid sized airports.

An S.A./Austin airport joint venture would be the epitome of thinking big?
That was my point.

HOU is a huge airport but it should be. SAT is not as bad as the article portrayed.
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  #1518  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2020, 1:26 PM
Tornado Tornado is offline
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SAT is too cramped and it makes for an unpleasant experience, especially during any holiday travel. With that said, SAT isn't alone in that category. Chicago Midway, Phoenix Sky Harbor, Newark and Kansas City are also on my list of crummy experiences. Schiphol in Amsterdam is a fantastic airport and would be something to mimic.

The biggest things I want out of an airport are clean bathrooms (give us a buc-ee's style set up), adequate space (width and height),and multiple dining areas so we aren't all competing for the same food and stuck in long lines.

cleanest airport bathrooms I've seen were in El Paso. They have a really nice airport for their size.

Also, can we get a separate sticky thread going for SAT updates and news? It would be nice to track new flights, terminal updates, etc in one place instead of having to hunt it in the metro thread.
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  #1519  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2020, 2:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Tornado View Post

Also, can we get a separate sticky thread going for SAT updates and news? It would be nice to track new flights, terminal updates, etc in one place instead of having to hunt it in the metro thread.
Why don't you start one?
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  #1520  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2020, 5:14 PM
Tornado Tornado is offline
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Why don't you start one?

that would be the logical move now, wouldn't it...I don't believe I've ever started a thread since I joined back in 2007. I honestly never looked for the button, haha
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