HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Mountain West


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #12461  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2019, 5:12 AM
TakeFive's Avatar
TakeFive TakeFive is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 5,532
TOD with a sky bridge

Since it's nearby to the Colorado Station, Denver approved an up-zoning request.

https://denverite.com/2019/10/23/dev...versity-hills/
Quote:
Two towers with homes, hotel rooms, office space and a restaurant could supplant a dry cleaner and a vacant liquor store in the University Hills neighborhood.

...their plans include 86 residential units, 120 to 130 hotel rooms, plus office space and a restaurant at Colorado Boulevard and Evans Avenue near the Colorado RTD station. They’d be spread across two buildings, one eight stories tall and the other 12, and connected by an elevated bridge.
__________________
Cool... Denver has reached puberty.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12462  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2019, 7:03 PM
TakeFive's Avatar
TakeFive TakeFive is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 5,532
Is all that Bike Infrastructure really necessary?


Photo: Gabrielle Lurie / The Chronicle

Interesting article out of the Bay Area.

In SF, bikes still aren’t a preferred means of travel
Nov. 27, 2019 By Phil Matier - San Francisco Chronicle
Quote:
In yet another effort to get people out of their cars, San Francisco is gearing up to install a record 100 new bikes racks a month in the coming year. How quickly the new racks fill up, however, remains to be seen.
Presumably there's a reason for this?
Quote:
“More bike racks will lead to more people biking,” Wiedenmeier said.

But if recent history is any indication, Weidenmeier’s “if you build it, they will come” thesis may be an iffy bet.
Numbers please.
Quote:
More than 106 miles of bike lanes were installed in the city between 2006 and 2018. And in the past five years, the city has added 2,676 bike racks. But despite the efforts to make pedaling to work faster, easier and safer, bike ridership has remained pretty much static.

According to San Francisco Municipal Transit Agency’s annual count, bike use, as compared to all trips taken in the city, has hovered between a high of 4.4 % in 2014 and a low of 3.1% in 2017.

And it’s not just in San Francisco. “When you focus on commute trips, patterns have been pretty static all around the Bay Area,” Goodwin added.
What do transportation commute surveys show for San Francisco?
Quote:
By comparison, the number of San Franciscans traveling in taxis, motorcycles, Lyfts and Ubers stayed between 61% and 65% — 6 out of 10 trips — according to the SFMTA’s 2018 transit trend report.

Mass transit represented about a third of the trips taken in 2018.
That's more than a head scratcher, especially if you compare it to what the Downtown Denver Partnership surveys indicate. See here.

So if Denver already has over twice as much bike commuter share (at 9%) as San Francisco with the existing infrastructure then why bother to build more? Doesn't it just get in the way of the effort to make downtown more pedestrian friendly?

Okay, not a serious question. My real question is "What is the likely ceiling for bike-share in Denver?"
__________________
Cool... Denver has reached puberty.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12463  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2019, 6:00 AM
Cirrus's Avatar
Cirrus Cirrus is offline
cities|transit|croissants
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 18,130
Quote:
So if Denver already has over twice as much bike commuter share (at 9%) as San Francisco...
It doesn't. The SF data is for all trips citywide (including buying groceries out in the neighborhoods), while the Denver number is only for commute trips into downtown. Denver's all trips citywide number is somewhere between 1-3%.

Quote:
My real question is "What is the likely ceiling for bike-share in Denver?"
Bikeshare specifically or bike usage in general? Assuming you mean the latter, here are some key facts (from the same link as above:

1. The highest all trips bike mode share city in the US is Davis, CA with about 20%. Davis (and places like Boulder) are small college towns with drastically different commute profiles than a big city like Denver, but they *can* be proxies for what's possible with non-work trips and last-mile type trips. If you assume a good transit network and that a lot of commute trips are bike-to-transit, Davis' 20% is probably the extreme upper limit for most US cities.

2. The highest big US city is Portland with a little over 6%. Portland is marginally better than Denver at both transit and bike stuff, but it's not another universe.

3. The US numbers (including Davis and Portland) have all gone up a lot over the last decade, so while it's hard to imagine Davis-like levels in a big US city, Portland should absolutely not be considered a ceiling.

4. Looking to foreign cities, it's easy to dismiss Amsterdam's 40% as just another universe and completely non-applicable to Denver, but Christchurch's 8% seems pretty within reach (nobody would bat an eye if Portland hit that). And while I can't think of any European city as sprawly as Denver, the 11% that Euro-sprawly Helsinki gets at least tells you that you can get pretty high with post-war non-central city development. Helsinki suburbs like Espo are in the 8% range, and anything you can do there you could also do along Colorado Boulevard (if maybe not Northglenn).

So in my head, something like 10% is a good goal for most big US cities. It's hard but possible.
__________________
BeyondDC: blog | twitter | flickr | instagram | Exploring urbanism and transportation in the Washington, DC area.

Last edited by Cirrus; Dec 4, 2019 at 6:14 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12464  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2019, 8:22 PM
TakeFive's Avatar
TakeFive TakeFive is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 5,532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
It doesn't. The SF data is for all trips citywide (including buying groceries out in the neighborhoods), while the Denver number is only for commute trips into downtown. Denver's all trips citywide number is somewhere between 1-3%.

Bikeshare specifically or bike usage in general? Assuming you mean the latter, here are some key facts (from the same link as above:
See how useful you are.

Thanks for the correction and putting things into proper context. It would be fun to fast-forward 30 years and see how much has changed.

Certainly I still cherish my time spent on trails, notably the Cherry Creek Trail and High Line Canal Trail. Even Aurora b/c it's (relatively) new has open space corridors built-in for storm drainage that include trails.

General bike usage however will be a much heavier lift. Central Denver with its expected densifying nodes will be more natural areas but even for the city in general its still hard for me to visualize.
__________________
Cool... Denver has reached puberty.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12465  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2019, 9:02 PM
TakeFive's Avatar
TakeFive TakeFive is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 5,532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
Bikeshare specifically or bike usage in general?
I'm not certain but we do have an update.


Credit CBS4 Denver

Redfin Ranks Denver As A Top Bikeable City In America
December 5, 2019 By Ben Warwick - CBS4 Denver
Quote:
DENVER (CBS4) – The bicyclists you see on every Denver street are in on the secret. Our city is one of the most bikeable in the country.

Redfin has ranked Denver as the fourth-best bike-friendly city, behind Minneapolis, Portland, and Chicago. Access to bike lanes, the number of hills, and other factors went into the grading.
Rumor has it that Denver is an ascendant biking city.
__________________
Cool... Denver has reached puberty.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12466  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2019, 7:31 PM
TakeFive's Avatar
TakeFive TakeFive is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 5,532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
1. The highest all trips bike mode share city in the US is Davis, CA with about 20%. Davis (and places like Boulder) are small college towns with drastically different commute profiles than a big city like Denver, but they *can* be proxies for what's possible with non-work trips and last-mile type trips. If you assume a good transit network and that a lot of commute trips are bike-to-transit, Davis' 20% is probably the extreme upper limit for most US cities.

2. The highest big US city is Portland with a little over 6%. Portland is marginally better than Denver at both transit and bike stuff, but it's not another universe.

3. The US numbers (including Davis and Portland) have all gone up a lot over the last decade, so while it's hard to imagine Davis-like levels in a big US city, Portland should absolutely not be considered a ceiling.

4. Looking to foreign cities, it's easy to dismiss Amsterdam's 40% as just another universe and completely non-applicable to Denver, but Christchurch's 8% seems pretty within reach (nobody would bat an eye if Portland hit that). And while I can't think of any European city as sprawly as Denver, the 11% that Euro-sprawly Helsinki gets at least tells you that you can get pretty high with post-war non-central city development. Helsinki suburbs like Espo are in the 8% range, and anything you can do there you could also do along Colorado Boulevard (if maybe not Northglenn).

So in my head, something like 10% is a good goal for most big US cities. It's hard but possible.
It takes me time to dial in for a closer look. Then there's the context (which is everything) and definitions. If I don't understand the context then I don't understand the data. I also found this page.

So mode share is a commuting percentage but does that mean at least once a month or does it mean every day (or most of the time)? Portland varies between 2% and 6.3%. Recent census data from 2016 gives Portland a 3% bike share but appears to include the 'urbanized' area across the river in Vancouver.

I'd also be curious of the density patterns in Portland. Generic density numbers that include bodies of water or large areas of land like DIA in Denver are likely more misleading than helpful.

For those who don't live along bus routes then either biking or ride-share would be more convenient. Between both these modes it enables more people to go car-lite.

Outside of the 'original six' Seattle is the ONE city where transit is a star. Perhaps that's also why their bike-share remains modest.

Consider this: Downtown Seattle has 2.25 times the employment density of Denver. Seattle's transit (all modes) has 1.8 times the ridership of Denver. Denver RTD, on the whole, is doing okay. Portland transit ridership is essentially the same as Denver although Denver is a bit bigger.

See how l like to create context as apposed to raw data?
__________________
Cool... Denver has reached puberty.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12467  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2019, 10:53 PM
TakeFive's Avatar
TakeFive TakeFive is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 5,532
Xcel Energy gets onboard the electric transit wagon

A bit nerdy; electric rates and how they're applied have a significant impact on RTD's electric fleet of buses used on the 16th street mall.

Denver RTD leads the pack in bus fleet electrification
DECEMBER 5, 2019 - Mass Transit Mag

Interestingly, the new rate structure is very much like what we do in the desert; only we have 6 months of higher 'summer' rates while Denver gets away with only 4 months.
__________________
Cool... Denver has reached puberty.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12468  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2019, 2:35 AM
The Dirt's Avatar
The Dirt The Dirt is offline
Ground Scraper
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 2,951
Umm, massive technicality since they're all mall shuttles.
__________________
"That emoticon is the most foolish thing you have posted in this whole thread full of foolish statements." - Cirrus
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12469  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2019, 7:42 PM
TakeFive's Avatar
TakeFive TakeFive is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 5,532
Designated pick-up and drop-off areas work as hoped

Boston has used a pilot program to study the impact of designated areas for ride-share and low and behold it was a huge success.

https://www.boston.gov/departments/t...passenger-cars
Quote:
We learned a great deal from the pilot and have drafted an initial assessment report after collecting four months of data. We relied on both quantitative and qualitative methods. A few of the findings are listed below:
  • Huge increase in curb productivity. The utilization rate of the curb increased by more than 350 percent in the pick-up/drop-off zone.
  • Parking incidents decreased. We saw an eight percent drop in overall parking citations in the area.
  • Safer behaviors observed. Observation data found a notable decrease in pick-up/drop-off activity happening in the travel lane after the zone was installed.
Who wouldathunk that common sense really works.
__________________
Cool... Denver has reached puberty.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Mountain West
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 2:01 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.