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  #7101  
Old Posted Today, 2:10 AM
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Rileybo Rileybo is offline
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Originally Posted by Atlas View Post
Nope, there's an apartment complex going in there.

Enough of this blandness, please! There’s 20 of the same damn building being built right now.
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  #7102  
Old Posted Today, 2:13 AM
Makid Makid is offline
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Originally Posted by Rileybo View Post
Enough of this blandness, please! There’s 20 of the same damn building being built right now.
Speaking of...

David Ross Scheer: Why do all the new apartment buildings look the same (and do they have to)?


https://www.sltrib.com/artsliving/20...tGtvja975ih0OI

Quote:
You can hardly help noticing the boom in apartment construction in and around downtown Salt Lake City. If you look a little closer, you’ll see that they are very much alike, like the same doll dressed up in different outfits.

The buildings I’m referring to are five to seven stories tall and have a boxy shape. The ground floor is a parking garage, sometimes combined with shops. Four or five stories of apartments or condos sit on top of this concrete “podium,” so they’re often called podium buildings. They cover a large area compared to older apartment buildings, often taking up a considerable portion of a block face.

These buildings are prevalent because they maximize developers’ profits by balancing leasable floor area (more is better) with construction cost (less is better). The residential floors are built of light wood framing because this is much less expensive than concrete or steel. The building code restricts this construction type to four stories, five if special lumber is used. For structural stability, wood framing requires large areas of flat, uninterrupted walls from the foundation to the roof. This gives podium buildings their boxy shape.

Simply put, podium buildings represent a proven formula for creating marketable housing at a reasonable cost.
Quote:
Podium buildings, which can achieve densities of 65-100 units per acre, are a response to the need for more affordable housing. Increasing density also contributes to sustainability by reducing the distance people need to commute to work and school, and making serving the area by transit more efficient.

So, bravo podium buildings, for playing an important part in solving our housing problems! But they could be even better if they were better designed.

Many podium buildings are street killers. Their ground floor parking garages come right up to the street edge of the property, creating a dead, blank wall (and no, windows into parking garages don’t help).

Their long street frontage worsens the problem. City planners have tried to avoid this by forcing some developers to provide commercial space along the street, with mixed results. Simply building commercial space doesn’t guarantee there is demand for it. In some cases, mandated commercial space has remained vacant or underused.
Quote:
What can we do to ensure that their effect will be positive?

The answer is not to try to regulate design. Salt Lake City has design guidelines (rules, really) in its zoning regulations. They have not prevented podium buildings from diminishing the vitality of our streets and have been responsible for many overwrought designs that will look outdated in a few years (and make the buildings harder to maintain). The fact that the guidelines are written, interpreted and applied by city planners with little or no training in design may be have something to do with this. But my experience as an architect has shown me that trying to codify good design in written regulations doesn’t work. The cure is often worse than the disease.

A better solution is for designers (both architects and their clients) to create better buildings by following a few voluntary guidelines:

• Put active uses, not parking garages, on the street-facing sides of buildings.

• Think of these buildings as background buildings, not showpieces. Too often designers try to make their building stand out by virtue of its unique design, competing with each other to make their project more eye-catching than the rest. The result is the visual cacophony we’re starting to see on 400 South. Instead of seeing them as isolated objects, the designers of podium buildings should view them as background buildings that make up the fabric of the city. This should stimulate, not stifle, designers’ imaginations.

• Use only exterior materials that convey a sense of permanence as befits a major city. Materials like stone, brick, precast concrete and glass are appropriate. Materials like stucco and residential siding are not.
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  #7103  
Old Posted Today, 3:09 AM
Utah_Dave Utah_Dave is offline
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Originally Posted by Stenar View Post
House prices may drop in some places, but they're not going to drop along the Wasatch Front.
Housing prices and there potential drop will be tied to several factors. Probably the biggest factor is how long this Coronavirus last/ or the uncertainty of how long it will last. When a vaccine or effective treatment is developed is when the uncertainty in the market will no longer be a negative factor and the market can move forward with a certain degree of clarity. Prices could drop if this goes on for a long enough time.

Unemployment and how quickly incomes rebound is another large factor.

Government intervention

Demand for products and services. Right now China, if you believe them, have the virus under some sort of control. However the public is nervous to venture out and return to normal so demand is still low so that’s bad for businesses.

If we can get an effective treatment before the vaccine is made then I would say things will look pretty good. If, instead, the public has to wait 12-18 months for a vaccine and without an effective treatment for that period of time then then I would say things look pretty bad.

An effective treatment and or vaccine will pretty much be our guide to the economy
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  #7104  
Old Posted Today, 4:33 AM
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Atlas Atlas is online now
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Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Boulder, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Makid View Post
Speaking of...

David Ross Scheer: Why do all the new apartment buildings look the same (and do they have to)?


https://www.sltrib.com/artsliving/20...tGtvja975ih0OI
Hah my favorite comment:

Quote:
Community: We have a terrific housing crisis and need new apartment supply.

Developers: Here's a product that may not be the prettiest but costs less per rental unit

Salt Lake Tribune Commenters: Ug-ly. Darn mormons.

Salt Lake Tribune Commenters: Don't build boxes, build cool stuff that pleases our hipster aesthetic.

Developer: It'll cost a lot.

Salt Lake Tribune Commenters: Housing affordability crisis. Developers building too much for the luxury market. Darn mormons.

Salt Lake Tribune Commenters: Apartment developers are greedy pigs. We need rent control to keep them from making too much money.

Developer: OK, I'll stop building apartments that I can't make money on.

Community: We have a terrific housing crisis and need new apartment supply.

Salt Lake Tribune Commenters: Darn mormons.

Rinse and repeat ....
Nice article though. I agree that some of the designs are pretty same-y and some of the projects don't have enough street engagement or use the best materials. I do like the increased density though and I think The Exchange and Moda Luxe stand out as some of the better ones.

Also, thanks for the update SLC_PopPunk!
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