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  #301  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2011, 1:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Muji View Post
The British have really produced some of the best Brutalist stuff. the Brunswick Centre really looks like one one of the style's finest products.

The city center of the Parisian suburb Ivry-sur-Seine was nearly entirely rebuilt at the hands of architect Jean Renaudie. All photos taken by me in 2009


I usually hate brutalist crap but damn, that is awesome!
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  #302  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2011, 9:03 AM
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The Genex Tower in Belgrade (pronounced with a hard 'G'):



The side covered with the ad is offices, and seems to be unoccupied although there are security guards. The other side is residential. The base is covered with graffiti:



This building is in Sion, Switzerland:

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  #303  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2011, 11:52 AM
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Ahhhh, this lovely little street has all the appeal of the death star exhaust port trench.

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  #304  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2011, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by PA Pride View Post
Ahhhh, this lovely little street has all the appeal of the death star exhaust port trench.
Brutalism was always a controversial architectural style and opinion is often polarised when it comes to such buildings. Then again this is a Brutalist thread.

Many of the old British Brutalist buildings have now been either demolished or gentrified (as is the case in estates such as the Park Hill Estate in Sheffield).

http://www.urbansplash.co.uk/gallery/park-hill

Park Hill - Before



Park Hill after Urban Splash Refurbishment



Saxton Leeds before

http://www.urbansplash.co.uk/gallery/saxton



Saxton Leeds After







Some Brutalism such as the Alexandra Road Estate (Rowley Way) have been retained as an example of this architectural style.

As for Rowley Way, it was innovative architecture having being constructed on land near a major rail line (West Coast Main Line), with the shape of the street designed to cut out the noise of the nearby trains, as were the rubber pads on which the foundations rested.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandra_Road_Estate



"The desire to control the sound and vibration from passing trains was a major consideration in the layout of the estate. Two rows of terraced apartments are aligned along the tracks. The higher, 8-story block directly adjacent to the railway line is organised in the form a ziggurat, and acts as a noise barrier that blocks the noise of the trains from reaching the interior portion of the site, and its foundations rest on rubber pads that eliminate vibration. A lower, 4-story block runs along the other side of a continuous pedestrian walkway, known as Rowley Way, serving both terraced rows of buildings. The third row of buildings, along the southern edge of the site, parallels another public walkway, Langtry Walk, between this row and the existing earlier buildings of the Ainsworth Estate and defines a public park with play areas between the second and third row of dwellings.

The lower 4-storey building along Rowley Way contains maisonettes with shared access, terraces, and gardens over-looking the park at the rear. Maisonettes also occupy the top two levels of the larger 8-storey building opposite, with entrance from a walkway on the 7th floor that runs the entire length of the structure. Dwellings in the lower floor in this block are entered from open stairs serving two dwellings per floor. The flat roofs of the stepped elevation provides private outdoor areas for every home. Garage parking is located beneath the building, and underneath the building at the rear alongside the railway tracks. "




Last edited by Codex; Feb 15, 2012 at 1:14 PM.
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  #305  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2011, 1:28 PM
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Massive Brutalist London Housing Esates such as the Kidbrooke (Ferrier) Estates, the Aylesbury estate and the Heygate estate (Elephand and Castle) are being replaced with new housing. These were some of the largest public housing estates in Europe and these redevelopments are seeing massive swathes of London redeveloped. The famous brutalist Robin Hood Gardens also faces demolition, as do a host of other post war estates and brutalist buildings. Some examples of Brutaism have however been given listed status preserved for future generations and 'The 20th Century Society' campaign for the preservation of buildings of significant architectural merit from this period in UK history.

http://www.c20society.org.uk/

http://www.greenwich.gov.uk/Greenwic...appensNext.htm

Kidbrooke Estate Before















Kidbrooke Esate After

























B]Phase One:[/B]




Phase Two:










Phase Three:






Last edited by Codex; Nov 19, 2011 at 1:58 AM.
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  #306  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2011, 12:26 AM
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Washington, DC:

Robert C. Weaver Federal Building (HUD HQ), 1968:





J. Edgar Hoover Building (FBI HQ), 1974



DC Metro (this station: McPherson Square, 1977)

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  #307  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2012, 7:01 PM
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Can't believe I haven't posted this in here until now!


wibiti.com


emporis.com


blogspot.com
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  #308  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2012, 7:53 PM
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^ i love, LOVE, LOVE granville tower. it's on my top 5 list of non-downtown highrises in chicago

i came close to buying a condo in it years ago. every unit is a 2-story unit, unusual for highrise living.
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  #309  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2012, 2:05 PM
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These guys really stick out in an otherwise pretty Oakville, Ontario.

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  #310  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2012, 11:32 PM
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We've got tons of them in San Diego!

Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA (1962-1965), designed by Louis Kahn.


Salk Institute by TheNose, on Flickr

San Diego Stadium (1967), formerly known as Jack Murphy Stadium, and currently Qualcomm Stadium. Home of the Chargers. Designed by Frank L. Hope and Associates.


San Diego Stadium by Modern San Diego, on Flickr

San Diego Juvenile Hall (1967), designed by Stanley J. French.


San Diego Juvenile Hall (1967) by Modern San Diego, on Flickr

Not really brutalist, but definitely brutalist inspired. San Diego Convention Center (1987-1989), designed by Arthur Erickson.


San Diego Convention Center by pchurch92, on Flickr

An architectural treasure. The Geisel (Dr. Seuss) Library, UCSD, La Jolla, CA (1973), designed by William Pereira.


Spaceship Reading Is Fundamental! by Mel(SD), on Flickr
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Last edited by Chapelo; Feb 1, 2012 at 3:21 AM.
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  #311  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2012, 1:15 PM
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Park Hill Estate- Sheffield, UK

Video Link
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  #312  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2012, 3:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Chapelo View Post

An architectural treasure. The Geisel (Dr. Seuss) Library, UCSD, La Jolla, CA (1973), designed by William Pereira.


Spaceship Reading Is Fundamental! by Mel(SD), on Flickr

what a fantastic beauty!
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  #313  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2012, 9:07 PM
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Quote:
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Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA (1962-1965), designed by Louis Kahn.


Salk Institute by TheNose, on Flickr
Salk is soooo very Zen. That plaza looks like it would be a great meditation space.
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  #314  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 2:46 AM
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In my region, NYC. Literally 90% of everything built from the 60's onward.
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  #315  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 3:20 AM
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idk, I'd say NYC's postwar architecture is dominated by glass boxes and housing projects until the 80s, and from then it's been a mix of postmodernism and more modernism.

As far as I can tell there doesn't seem to be a super ton of brutalism, and it's even less common considering how huge NYC is.
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  #316  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 3:27 AM
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It's less common these days. BUT back in the 60's-80's you'd be like WOW, what's going on.
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  #317  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 2:21 PM
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^^^ I can hardly think of any brutalist buildings in NYC, examples?
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  #318  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 4:11 PM
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Europol's new HQ building in the Hague (Netherlands) seems to have a very brutalist influence and aspect to it. Perhaps this is a theme when it comes to law enforcement with other global examples including the FBI HQ in Washington DC and Interpol's HQ in Lyon (France).

https://www.europol.europa.eu/conten...laan-hague-955

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  #319  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 9:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Nowhereman1280 View Post
^^^ I can hardly think of any brutalist buildings in NYC, examples?
How bout the building that destroyed the romantic Lower Manhattan skyline (One Chase Manhattan Plaza), or the building that replaced the Singer Building (One Liberty Plaza), or the complex that replaced (old) Penn Station. Just three examples, there are MANY more.
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  #320  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 9:31 PM
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How bout the building that destroyed the romantic Lower Manhattan skyline (One Chase Manhattan Plaza), or the building that replaced the Singer Building (One Liberty Plaza), or the complex that replaced (old) Penn Station. Just three examples, there are MANY more.
none of those are examples of brutalism.

brutalism =/= modernism.

brutalism is a subset of modernism.
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