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View Poll Results: What Political Party (if any; see last option) are you most drawn to?
NDP 3 11.11%
Liberals 7 25.93%
Conservatives 17 62.96%
Independent 0 0%
Voters: 27. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 9:26 PM
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Politics in Winnipeg and Manitoba

What political party are you most drawn to, if any?
What policy/policies or ideas do you think are/would be most benevolent for the city/province?
What policy/policies or ideas are/would be most detrimental for the city/province?

(I post this, as many times we seem to discuss bits and pieces of these questions in the main construction thread, and I thought it be nice to have it in one area, for those who may or may not want to read about politics, and perhaps the effects of political markings on construction.)

Edit: I omitted the Greens (and Communists, etc.) as an option, because they just don't have a strong or realized presence in the province of Manitoba. Sorry to those that offends.
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Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 10:09 PM
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you forgot the green party...
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  #3  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 10:23 PM
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It was an edit, but it was nonetheless an edit 43 minutes before you posted, Adrian. I explicitly left the Green party off of the poll for the reason stated in my original post. If I include them, I would have to include every other party that doesn't have a single representative in the legislature, which would make for a ridiculous poll. The Greens also failed if memory serves me correctly, to have a representative in each riding. Thus, I don't consider them - yet - a "realized" political party. They are still in their infancy. Its not a bad thing, just a point that I feel is reasonable enough to exclude them from the poll.
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Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 11:03 PM
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why does manitoba have such a shitty ass selection of polititions to vote for?
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Old Posted Mar 2, 2008, 1:35 AM
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That is likely a very complex answer. However, given the salaries reported in the Free Press not too long ago, I would argue that opportunity cost has a lot to do with it. A life in politics is a life under public scrutiny, and likely great pressure at some points, if not continuously. If you are a skilled individual, with leadership qualities, able to make sound judgement calls that affect many people and do it all for the better, you could go into small or large enterprise and make much more than the premier makes. This is all not to say that anything over $100,000 as annual income is modest - because it is not. However, the type of individuals one tries to attract to the province's high chair, likely can make much more elsewhere, and perhaps deal with far less stress.

I don't mean to posture that all of our public service employees aren't of high quality. Some are excellent. However, I do feel that opportunity cost does keep some - and perhaps great - leaders away. This is of course sheer speculation, and clearly you can't just ratchet up public service salaries without one, causing internal strife, and two, a likely backlash from the public.
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  #6  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2008, 1:52 AM
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It's hard to say. The Liberals are too weak to throw the balance of power in between the NDP and Conservative parties. I am a Liberal myself, but it seems that most of these guys are unconvincing.
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  #7  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2008, 8:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ajs View Post
why does manitoba have such a shitty ass selection of polititions to vote for?
You think Manitoba has a poor selection of candidates? Ontario's candidates are so bad that more than half of us don't even bother voting anymore!!
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Old Posted Mar 2, 2008, 3:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ajs View Post
why does manitoba have such a shitty ass selection of polititions to vote for?
You could probably say that for every province in Canada.
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  #9  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2008, 6:43 PM
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I wish there would be a greater emphasis put on politics. I'm not talking about turning it into a hype machine like professional sports, but there is no reason why people in their communities shouldn't readily know (more so than a token pamphelet once every couple of months) what their elected public representatives are doing/thinking. I know there are some articlesin the regional papers (Lance, Metro, etc.) but I don't consider that ready access. People generally take those papers and transport them straight to their blue bin without even so much as reading the front page headline. I would be in favour of web logs (bi-daily, maybe?, excluding weekends) written by the politician to give his or her electorate a strong idea of what is on their mind. There seems to be a lot of fear amongst politicians that they have to be flawless. I really don't believe that we as an electoral base expect perfection. Instead we want to see good human beings doing their best to act in our most pressing interests. In my opinion, if there was a strong connection between the politician and the people some gaffs would be tolerated. Thus, I think there is a lack of accessibility in politics. Or at the very least, accessibility isn't brough to the people in the best possible manner. I would therefore argue that if relationships were forged between politician and the electorate we wouldn't have the disconnect we have now, as some people feel completely disenchanted about their potential public representatives.
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  #10  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2008, 8:12 PM
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The good thing about Manitoba is that it is not a one party state like Alberta . At least the opposition has an impact/chance in this province.
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  #11  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2008, 9:36 PM
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Given Mary Agnes Welch's article today in the "Perspective" section of the Winnipeg Free Press and the previous debate that has dragged on about the issue of running transmission lines down the East or West side of Lake Winnipeg, where do all us sky scraper forumers stand?
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  #12  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2008, 10:45 PM
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its stupid to put it beisde the curent line... speacly if a masive winter storm came threw and took that lines out...........

though i herd hydro was now looking at puting the lines under lake winnipeg instead...
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  #13  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2008, 10:55 PM
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The underwater approach would still cost more then the east side route.

Instead of running away from the problem Hydro needs to step up to the plate with the provincial government, and negotiate with the native bands and run it down the east side.

Implement training programs and give the natives meaningful jobs which they can use to support their communities and at the same time develop a roadway beside the line so that they no longer have to rely on winter roads for supplies.

This will be a missed opportunity for economic development within the province if an east side approach is not taken.
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  #14  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2008, 6:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILYR View Post
The good thing about Manitoba is that it is not a one party state like Alberta . At least the opposition has an impact/chance in this province.
True .. but in Alberta the NDP does not even have official party status. .. so it isn't all bad.
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  #15  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2008, 4:03 PM
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Yes. The less points of view, the better!
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  #16  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2008, 6:37 PM
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There go property taxes: Ashton hinting NDP will reject Katz's threat

By TOM BRODBECK | Winnipeg Sun


Hold on to your wallets, folks.

It looks like property taxes are going up in Winnipeg next year.

And it won't just be school divisions this time.

Mayor Sam Katz threatened last week to jack up property taxes in 2009 unless the Doer government hands him a windfall in next month's provincial budget.

Well, it doesn't look like he's going to get that windfall.

At least that's what provincial Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Steve Ashton hinted at yesterday.

"We are already leaders in this country on municipal funding," Ashton told the Sun. "We're already part of the solution."

It's no big surprise considering the Doer government has already made substantial increases to city coffers in recent years.

Ashton reminded the city it already gets a share of income and corporate taxes and the province has increased funding through the Building Manitoba Fund.

"What we've done in recent years is very significant," said Ashton. "I think the numbers speak for themselves."

The truth is, Katz is looking for a scapegoat to blame for his own mismanagement of city hall finances.

He's talking about a tax increase now to try to take the sting out of it next year.

He knows very well the province has already substantially increased funding to the city in recent years and it's unrealistic to expect a windfall on top of that.

Katz made some spending cuts in last week's budget but also increased spending in many other discretionary areas. Overall, he's jacking up spending by 3.6% -- more than twice the rate of inflation.

And now he wants the province to pick up an even larger part of the city's tab, claiming he has no choice but to raise property taxes for the first time in 11 years if the province doesn't bail him out. He even put it in writing.

"Without significant improvement in our financial arrangements with the province ... this remarkable property tax freeze will not be continued in 2009," Katz wrote in the budget's opening remarks.

IT'S A MYTH

It's a city hall myth the province isn't doing its share to fund city services.

Just to put it into perspective, the city is increasing spending by $26 million this year. According to the city's own budget, about 35% -- or $9 million -- of that increase comes from additional provincial funding in 2008.

Katz and others at city hall complain they need provincial funding increases that grow with the economy.

Well, provincial funding to the city this year will jump to $90 million from $81 million in 2007 -- an 11% increase.

That's more than three times the rate of economic growth forecasted for Manitoba this year.

And Katz expects even more on top of that, at a time when he's also getting record levels of federal funding, including a new portion of the federal gas tax?

Please.

It's not that the city won't continue to get some increases from the province this year and in the future.

But it hardly sounds like the kind of windfall Katz is talking about.

"There will be increased funding through existing mechanisms," said Ashton. "We think that's a good deal."

Katz can go ahead and jack up property taxes next year if he wants.

But he has neither the political mandate nor the financial argument to do so.
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  #17  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2008, 5:37 PM
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Given that everyone has now had about a day to reflect on the Selinger 2008 budget, what are the general thoughts.

Personally, I thought it was a disgraceful budget. When you offer lots of little things, you essentially offer nothing at all. These little chiclets he tossed out to myriad groups and organizations are more about maintaining loyalty than enacting any positive change or development.

-Nobody in the province uses coal (basically 2 joints, the 3, the Brandon plant is already phasing out), so this was a complete waste. Nice sound-bite though.

-$5 million for day care doesn't buy much, but nice try Mr. Doer.

-Glad we're making it very viable for small business to operate, but nothing was done (hello, payroll tax) to increase larger firms to invest here.

-Spending is way up, yet the economic times are uncertain, and we have a MOUNTING debt to pay down.

-Reliance on transfer payments is stronger than ever, yet we have done nothing that could even remotely be interpreted to help balloon the economy.

Killing the tuition freeze, and helping hand to the waste-water treatment were about the only positives I drew from this.

It was a blind and dreary budget for me.

It didn't help business, it didn't help the poor, and it didn't help our citizens or our national/international image. It didn't even make the books lighter. Ouch.
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  #18  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2008, 3:43 PM
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The NDP have shown little knowledge or understanding of urban issues, though for better or worse they do fund large downtown initiatives.

The Conservatives are waaaaaay worse.

The Liberals talk the right talk on Winnipeg-related issues -- and are the only politicians to actively come out and support rapid transit. They've never been given the chance to walk the walk, but I can tell that out of sheer frustration with the hicks that dominate the Conservatives and the small minds of the NDP, neither will be getting my vote next election.
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