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  #221  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2004, 7:34 PM
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The Uptown boom accelerates. From a Dallasmetropolis poster:

Quote:
FYI. As they finalize the completion of The Ashton, situated adjacent to The Crescent Court Hotel, the Hanover Co. is preparing to break ground on another 27-story luxury residential highrise on the parcel located at the corner of Alamo St. across from The 'W'.

"The Icon at Victory"...More details to follow...
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  #222  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2004, 7:34 PM
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The Uptown boom accelerates. From a Dallasmetropolis poster:

Quote:
FYI. As they finalize the completion of The Ashton, situated adjacent to The Crescent Court Hotel, the Hanover Co. is preparing to break ground on another 27-story luxury residential highrise on the parcel located at the corner of Alamo St. across from The 'W'.

"The Icon at Victory"...More details to follow...
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  #223  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2004, 7:38 PM
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New Buildings for the First Baptist Church of Dallas in DT.



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  #224  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2004, 7:38 PM
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New Buildings for the First Baptist Church of Dallas in DT.



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  #225  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2005, 6:49 PM
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www.victorydallas.com

Victory is adding apartments
Houston builder also is working on rental project near Crescent


10:52 PM CST on Tuesday, January 18, 2005


By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News



A Houston builder is joining the Victory building boom.

Hanover Co. is planning a 28-story apartment tower, according to Ross Perot Jr., whose Hillwood Capital is a co-owner and developer of the Victory project near downtown. It will be on Houston Street near American Airlines Center.

The Houston builder is already working on the Ashton, a 21-story building a few blocks away at 2215 Cedar Springs Road across from the Crescent.

"Hanover is now coming into the project to build another 28-story tower of multi-family for rent product," Mr. Perot told builders meeting in Florida this weekend.

Mr. Perot said Victory will ultimately have 5,000 condos and apartments.

"You are now seeing a huge urban residential redevelopment boom," he said. "It's a trend that surprised us."

Hanover officials confirmed Tuesday that they're planning the Victory building.

"The Hanover Co. has interest in this site and is currently in the early phase of the due diligence cycle," said Hanover's Leah MacDougal. "We are not ready to comment further."

Construction has already begun on four residential buildings at Victory.

Mr. Perot's Hillwood Capital is building the 31-story W Dallas Victory Hotel and Residences. Last week, Hillwood announced that it's starting work on a 15-story condo tower attached to the W.

And Fairfield Development has broken ground on two residential buildings on Houston Street just north of Woodall Rodgers Freeway.

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com
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  #226  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2005, 6:49 PM
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www.victorydallas.com

Victory is adding apartments
Houston builder also is working on rental project near Crescent


10:52 PM CST on Tuesday, January 18, 2005


By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News



A Houston builder is joining the Victory building boom.

Hanover Co. is planning a 28-story apartment tower, according to Ross Perot Jr., whose Hillwood Capital is a co-owner and developer of the Victory project near downtown. It will be on Houston Street near American Airlines Center.

The Houston builder is already working on the Ashton, a 21-story building a few blocks away at 2215 Cedar Springs Road across from the Crescent.

"Hanover is now coming into the project to build another 28-story tower of multi-family for rent product," Mr. Perot told builders meeting in Florida this weekend.

Mr. Perot said Victory will ultimately have 5,000 condos and apartments.

"You are now seeing a huge urban residential redevelopment boom," he said. "It's a trend that surprised us."

Hanover officials confirmed Tuesday that they're planning the Victory building.

"The Hanover Co. has interest in this site and is currently in the early phase of the due diligence cycle," said Hanover's Leah MacDougal. "We are not ready to comment further."

Construction has already begun on four residential buildings at Victory.

Mr. Perot's Hillwood Capital is building the 31-story W Dallas Victory Hotel and Residences. Last week, Hillwood announced that it's starting work on a 15-story condo tower attached to the W.

And Fairfield Development has broken ground on two residential buildings on Houston Street just north of Woodall Rodgers Freeway.

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com
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  #227  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2005, 6:50 PM
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Redevelopment projects go from bust to boom
12:08 PM CST on Saturday, January 15, 2005
By DAVID FLICK / The Dallas Morning News
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcon...lick.4389f.html


There has been nothing like it in downtown Dallas for 20 years. After a period when progress on redevelopment seemed stalled, or at least invisible, the coming year will see at least 10 projects in various states of construction in the center city. Most of the projects will convert office buildings into residential and retail space. The DP&L and Interurban buildings will be ready for occupancy in the first half of the year, and city officials say they expect construction to begin or continue on the Republic Bank Tower, Gulf States Building, Fidelity Union Life Insurance building, the so-called Davis lot, the 1414 Elm St. building and the 1200 Main St. building.

In addition, work will proceed on the new hotel-retail complex at 1530 Main St. and the retail building at 1217 Main St. The last time we had so much construction going on downtown at one time was six years ago, and this is much larger than that," said Alice Murray, president of the Central Dallas Association. "I think it makes a big statement." Last week's edition of Downtown This Week, published by the CDA and the Downtown Improvement District, noted that the number of housing units downtown grew 747 percent between 1995 and 2005 – from 250 units (all of them in the venerable Manor House) to 1,867.

Within two years, that number is expected to more than double – to 4,309 residential units. And that figure may already be an underestimate. This month, 3J Development LLC of San Diego said it would convert the 33-story tower at 1600 Pacific Ave. into 370 residential units and has indicated it may have a similar announcement soon on the Praetorian Building. Even these projects could be dwarfed if negotiations with Forest City Enterprises of Cleveland produce a commitment to convert the mammoth Mercantile Bank complex into apartments and retail space.



There is much that remains to be done before downtown is transformed. Interest among retailers is picking up but is still in the early stages. Overall property values have yet to show a significant increase. Still, the sudden flurry of construction has resulted in a renewed feeling of optimism among downtown supporters, who throughout much of last year seemed to be keeping one another's spirits up. "We're starting to get the pieces together to be a real neighborhood," said Don Raines Jr., president of the Downtown Residents Council. "I think that it's becoming a pretty good success story." Could it prove to be too much at once? Right now, the people with a financial stake in the outcome say not. Joe Sapp, president of 3J Development, said he has no qualms about creating residential units at 1600 Pacific so close to the 500 units that developers Ted and Larry Hamilton are planning in the old Fidelity Union building.

"It's like an intersection where you have a Wal-Mart on one corner and Home Depot on the other. They don't so much compete with each other as bring more people in," Mr. Sapp said. Ted Hamilton agrees. "I think we're still at the point where additional projects would be synergistic rather than competitive," he said. "Even something as large as the Mercantile, I think, would so change the nature of that area and spark so much street life that it would not be competing." If there is a feeling of competitiveness between the two developers, it must not be too severe. Mr. Sapp has recently rented an apartment in the Davis Building. Mr. Hamilton, in other words, is his new landlord.



The one thing these projects have in common is that all have received city tax money to help get the development under way. The exception, to everyone's surprise, was Mr. Sapp's 1600 Pacific project, which was announced this month without any request being made for city funds. Yet. The first residential project that gets built without taxpayer money will mark a watershed – it will be an indication that the marketplace, and not just urban policy, sees downtown redevelopment as the wave of the future. But it is unclear whether the future is now. Mr. Sapp says merely that company officials are still making up their minds whether to ask for city funds.
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  #228  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2005, 6:50 PM
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Redevelopment projects go from bust to boom
12:08 PM CST on Saturday, January 15, 2005
By DAVID FLICK / The Dallas Morning News
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcon...lick.4389f.html


There has been nothing like it in downtown Dallas for 20 years. After a period when progress on redevelopment seemed stalled, or at least invisible, the coming year will see at least 10 projects in various states of construction in the center city. Most of the projects will convert office buildings into residential and retail space. The DP&L and Interurban buildings will be ready for occupancy in the first half of the year, and city officials say they expect construction to begin or continue on the Republic Bank Tower, Gulf States Building, Fidelity Union Life Insurance building, the so-called Davis lot, the 1414 Elm St. building and the 1200 Main St. building.

In addition, work will proceed on the new hotel-retail complex at 1530 Main St. and the retail building at 1217 Main St. The last time we had so much construction going on downtown at one time was six years ago, and this is much larger than that," said Alice Murray, president of the Central Dallas Association. "I think it makes a big statement." Last week's edition of Downtown This Week, published by the CDA and the Downtown Improvement District, noted that the number of housing units downtown grew 747 percent between 1995 and 2005 – from 250 units (all of them in the venerable Manor House) to 1,867.

Within two years, that number is expected to more than double – to 4,309 residential units. And that figure may already be an underestimate. This month, 3J Development LLC of San Diego said it would convert the 33-story tower at 1600 Pacific Ave. into 370 residential units and has indicated it may have a similar announcement soon on the Praetorian Building. Even these projects could be dwarfed if negotiations with Forest City Enterprises of Cleveland produce a commitment to convert the mammoth Mercantile Bank complex into apartments and retail space.



There is much that remains to be done before downtown is transformed. Interest among retailers is picking up but is still in the early stages. Overall property values have yet to show a significant increase. Still, the sudden flurry of construction has resulted in a renewed feeling of optimism among downtown supporters, who throughout much of last year seemed to be keeping one another's spirits up. "We're starting to get the pieces together to be a real neighborhood," said Don Raines Jr., president of the Downtown Residents Council. "I think that it's becoming a pretty good success story." Could it prove to be too much at once? Right now, the people with a financial stake in the outcome say not. Joe Sapp, president of 3J Development, said he has no qualms about creating residential units at 1600 Pacific so close to the 500 units that developers Ted and Larry Hamilton are planning in the old Fidelity Union building.

"It's like an intersection where you have a Wal-Mart on one corner and Home Depot on the other. They don't so much compete with each other as bring more people in," Mr. Sapp said. Ted Hamilton agrees. "I think we're still at the point where additional projects would be synergistic rather than competitive," he said. "Even something as large as the Mercantile, I think, would so change the nature of that area and spark so much street life that it would not be competing." If there is a feeling of competitiveness between the two developers, it must not be too severe. Mr. Sapp has recently rented an apartment in the Davis Building. Mr. Hamilton, in other words, is his new landlord.



The one thing these projects have in common is that all have received city tax money to help get the development under way. The exception, to everyone's surprise, was Mr. Sapp's 1600 Pacific project, which was announced this month without any request being made for city funds. Yet. The first residential project that gets built without taxpayer money will mark a watershed – it will be an indication that the marketplace, and not just urban policy, sees downtown redevelopment as the wave of the future. But it is unclear whether the future is now. Mr. Sapp says merely that company officials are still making up their minds whether to ask for city funds.
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  #229  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2005, 3:58 PM
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The Azure

Harwood International's New Division Unveils $100M Condo Project
By Connie Gore
Last updated: January 24, 2005 08:21am

DALLAS-Promising to raise the bar on condo designs, Harwood International today unveils the Azure, a 31-story, sleek tower set to rise as the first in a branded line for an emerging subsidiary. The $100-million high rise will break ground April 15.


Harwood CEO Gabriel Barbier-Mueller and Harwood Living president Julie Morris will share the dais with Dallas Mayor Laura Miller and several council members at the 2 p.m. debut of a 10-foot model at the 2828 N. Harwood St. sales center. The 202-unit Azure, bearing a spring 2007 delivery, will rise at 2900 McKinnon St. on 1.3 acres in Harwood's 12-block footprint in Uptown. The site will take three months to prep, with the expectation that the Azure will start to go vertical by midsummer.


Barbier-Mueller tells GlobeSt.com that he's been waiting nearly two decades for Dallas to emerge as a luxury condo market. "I waited for this area to create a need for an urban residential environment," says the developer of one million sf of trophy office and retail space in Uptown and heir to a family responsible for developing 45,000 residential units in Switzerland.


The project site was ticketed for another office building in Harwood International Center until three years ago when Barbier-Mueller started mapping out a new plan, sped along by Uptown's top-performing commercial markets and the return of condos as hot properties in most US metros. He then laid the groundwork for Harwood Living, now a team of 12 brought together to lead the Azure's development and sales plus act as a model for a branded residential portfolio.


"We are exploring other markets," Barbier-Mueller says, "but at this time we're focused on the Azure, which will become the showroom." He adds it's too preliminary to discuss other locations, but did say the search includes the US and Europe. He's also not ruling out a sister project for Harwood's Uptown blocks. "It depends on the success of this one," he adds. "But as Dallas continues to mature, I think that's certainly a possibility."


The Azure will break ground with some condos sales closed and several prospects eyeing penthouses. The number of sales isn't being released. However, early buyers have been from out of town, including one with homes in Mexico, Europe and Dallas. "We're well ahead of where we thought we'd be," Barbier-Mueller says.


Morris predicts the Azure, with units from $400,000 to $4 million, will be sold out before construction is done. Each floor is designed with eight units, ranging from 881 sf to 5,025 sf and terraces of 134 sf to 3,940 sf. The high rise will take up one-third of the 1.3 acres and the balance will be laid out with gardens and an Olympic-size swimming pool with private cabanas. Underground parking will feature two-vehicle, private garages.


The Azure is being touted as a new landmark for the Dallas skyline with "a walk-to-life lifestyle" for its proximity to upscale entertainment and restaurant venues along with a built-in, resort-style amenities comparable to a five-star hotel. Cabinetry will come from Germany; stones will be imported from France; and the skin will be floor-to-ceiling glass for unobstructed views from the tallest building in Uptown, 375 feet or nearly 140 feet higher than its neighbors.


As Uptown booms with condo development, Barbier-Mueller says his team's created a niche in the luxury arena. "We don't have a hotel with it. We are focused on privacy and exclusivity of the 200 residents," he says. "We are definitely offering a new style of lifestyle."


Barbier-Mueller's Harwood is partnering with Westbank Projects Corp. of Vancouver, BC on the development, designed by James KM Cheng Architects Inc., with offices in Vancouver and New York City, and Gensler Architects, a San Francisco-headquartered international firm with offices in 25 cities. Dallas-based SWA Group is the landscape architect while Gensler and Lauren Rottet of Los Angeles teamed on interior designs. Harwood Living is overseeing a sales team that includes Gullotto Group/Ebby Halliday Realtors and the Seattle-based Rennie Marketing Systems. Barbier-Mueller says 70% of the subcontractors are in place while the decision is still out on a general contractor.
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  #230  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2005, 3:58 PM
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The Azure

Harwood International's New Division Unveils $100M Condo Project
By Connie Gore
Last updated: January 24, 2005 08:21am

DALLAS-Promising to raise the bar on condo designs, Harwood International today unveils the Azure, a 31-story, sleek tower set to rise as the first in a branded line for an emerging subsidiary. The $100-million high rise will break ground April 15.


Harwood CEO Gabriel Barbier-Mueller and Harwood Living president Julie Morris will share the dais with Dallas Mayor Laura Miller and several council members at the 2 p.m. debut of a 10-foot model at the 2828 N. Harwood St. sales center. The 202-unit Azure, bearing a spring 2007 delivery, will rise at 2900 McKinnon St. on 1.3 acres in Harwood's 12-block footprint in Uptown. The site will take three months to prep, with the expectation that the Azure will start to go vertical by midsummer.


Barbier-Mueller tells GlobeSt.com that he's been waiting nearly two decades for Dallas to emerge as a luxury condo market. "I waited for this area to create a need for an urban residential environment," says the developer of one million sf of trophy office and retail space in Uptown and heir to a family responsible for developing 45,000 residential units in Switzerland.


The project site was ticketed for another office building in Harwood International Center until three years ago when Barbier-Mueller started mapping out a new plan, sped along by Uptown's top-performing commercial markets and the return of condos as hot properties in most US metros. He then laid the groundwork for Harwood Living, now a team of 12 brought together to lead the Azure's development and sales plus act as a model for a branded residential portfolio.


"We are exploring other markets," Barbier-Mueller says, "but at this time we're focused on the Azure, which will become the showroom." He adds it's too preliminary to discuss other locations, but did say the search includes the US and Europe. He's also not ruling out a sister project for Harwood's Uptown blocks. "It depends on the success of this one," he adds. "But as Dallas continues to mature, I think that's certainly a possibility."


The Azure will break ground with some condos sales closed and several prospects eyeing penthouses. The number of sales isn't being released. However, early buyers have been from out of town, including one with homes in Mexico, Europe and Dallas. "We're well ahead of where we thought we'd be," Barbier-Mueller says.


Morris predicts the Azure, with units from $400,000 to $4 million, will be sold out before construction is done. Each floor is designed with eight units, ranging from 881 sf to 5,025 sf and terraces of 134 sf to 3,940 sf. The high rise will take up one-third of the 1.3 acres and the balance will be laid out with gardens and an Olympic-size swimming pool with private cabanas. Underground parking will feature two-vehicle, private garages.


The Azure is being touted as a new landmark for the Dallas skyline with "a walk-to-life lifestyle" for its proximity to upscale entertainment and restaurant venues along with a built-in, resort-style amenities comparable to a five-star hotel. Cabinetry will come from Germany; stones will be imported from France; and the skin will be floor-to-ceiling glass for unobstructed views from the tallest building in Uptown, 375 feet or nearly 140 feet higher than its neighbors.


As Uptown booms with condo development, Barbier-Mueller says his team's created a niche in the luxury arena. "We don't have a hotel with it. We are focused on privacy and exclusivity of the 200 residents," he says. "We are definitely offering a new style of lifestyle."


Barbier-Mueller's Harwood is partnering with Westbank Projects Corp. of Vancouver, BC on the development, designed by James KM Cheng Architects Inc., with offices in Vancouver and New York City, and Gensler Architects, a San Francisco-headquartered international firm with offices in 25 cities. Dallas-based SWA Group is the landscape architect while Gensler and Lauren Rottet of Los Angeles teamed on interior designs. Harwood Living is overseeing a sales team that includes Gullotto Group/Ebby Halliday Realtors and the Seattle-based Rennie Marketing Systems. Barbier-Mueller says 70% of the subcontractors are in place while the decision is still out on a general contractor.
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  #231  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2005, 5:27 PM
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Developers have lofty goals for area south of downtown
Project in Cedars neighborhood to blend homes, workspaces


11:21 PM CST on Monday, January 24, 2005


By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News



Two business owners in the Cedars neighborhood are planning a combination workspace and residential project just south of downtown.

Partners Zad Roumaya and Kevin Parma want to build about 35 of their Dream Lofts along Akard Street at Griffin.

The project is a block across Interstate 30 from downtown Dallas in an area that is seeing redevelopment. The new Dallas police headquarters complex and huge Southside on Lamar loft apartment project are a few blocks away.

"The workspace will be on the first floor and serve as a storefront," Mr. Roumaya said. Above that, the buildings that front Akard will have two floors of townhomes.

"The location allows us to have great views of downtown," Mr. Parma said. "And the Akard Street bridge across I-30 is a direct pedestrian connection" to the central business district.

Mr. Roumaya began renovating small commercial buildings in the Cedars district about seven years ago.

He operates the Change Chamber Studios out of a remodeled garage on Akard. It provides facilities for design and fabrication of artwork and is used for temporary shows.

"We get a lot of pride out of saving some of these old buildings," he said.

Much of the neighborhood has been cleared and has caught the eye of potential developers.

Development sites in the Cedars area trade for $10 per square foot or less, compared with more than $70 per square foot on the north side of downtown.

The lofts, which Mr. Roumaya and Mr. Parma plan to start in the next few months, will range from about 900 square feet to 1,500 square feet and will start at around $120,000.

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com
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  #232  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2005, 5:27 PM
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Developers have lofty goals for area south of downtown
Project in Cedars neighborhood to blend homes, workspaces


11:21 PM CST on Monday, January 24, 2005


By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News



Two business owners in the Cedars neighborhood are planning a combination workspace and residential project just south of downtown.

Partners Zad Roumaya and Kevin Parma want to build about 35 of their Dream Lofts along Akard Street at Griffin.

The project is a block across Interstate 30 from downtown Dallas in an area that is seeing redevelopment. The new Dallas police headquarters complex and huge Southside on Lamar loft apartment project are a few blocks away.

"The workspace will be on the first floor and serve as a storefront," Mr. Roumaya said. Above that, the buildings that front Akard will have two floors of townhomes.

"The location allows us to have great views of downtown," Mr. Parma said. "And the Akard Street bridge across I-30 is a direct pedestrian connection" to the central business district.

Mr. Roumaya began renovating small commercial buildings in the Cedars district about seven years ago.

He operates the Change Chamber Studios out of a remodeled garage on Akard. It provides facilities for design and fabrication of artwork and is used for temporary shows.

"We get a lot of pride out of saving some of these old buildings," he said.

Much of the neighborhood has been cleared and has caught the eye of potential developers.

Development sites in the Cedars area trade for $10 per square foot or less, compared with more than $70 per square foot on the north side of downtown.

The lofts, which Mr. Roumaya and Mr. Parma plan to start in the next few months, will range from about 900 square feet to 1,500 square feet and will start at around $120,000.

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com
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  #233  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2005, 1:41 AM
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Some awesome Mondrian updates from jsoto3 on Dallasmetropolis



The block around it will create a nice streetscape



Heck of a neighbor to have


Some lucky person(s) future view. Really shows how dense the southern areas of Uptown are becoming.




sidewalk fountain


this will be one great neighborhood once it fills out.
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  #234  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2005, 1:41 AM
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Some awesome Mondrian updates from jsoto3 on Dallasmetropolis



The block around it will create a nice streetscape



Heck of a neighbor to have


Some lucky person(s) future view. Really shows how dense the southern areas of Uptown are becoming.




sidewalk fountain


this will be one great neighborhood once it fills out.
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  #235  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2005, 1:48 AM
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ooms with a redo

Praetorian Building to become lofts, have exterior restored

11:58 PM CST on Thursday, March 3, 2005

By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News

When the Praetorian Building opened on Main Street in 1908, people paid a quarter to climb to the top floor and look out over downtown.

At 16 stories, it was the tallest building in Texas.

But the last office tenants of "the pioneer skyscraper of the Southwest" moved out in 1993.

Now a California investor has decided that the landmark could be a hit with loft apartment renters. 3J Development LLC of San Diego bought the Praetorian Building this week.

"It's not going to be sitting empty much longer," said 3J Development president Joseph Sapp. "We are not going to let it sit dormant but are going to move forward with the project."

The Praetorian is 3J Development's second buy in downtown Dallas. Mr. Sapp's development partner in the project is Don Cooksey of CGP LLP in California.

Last month, the commercial builder and investor purchased the mostly vacant 1600 Pacific tower. The 33-story, black glass tower will be turned into about 370 residential units.

The Praetorian Building and 1600 Pacific (formerly the LTV Building) are a block apart on the popular Stone Street Gardens mall.

Terms of the sale were not disclosed, but the Praetorian Building is valued at about $900,000 on the tax rolls. 3J Development bought it from a Singapore investor.

The Praetorian was built with an elaborate stone exterior. But the classical architecture was obliterated in the 1960s, when the building was "modernized" with a metal-and-glass exterior.

The new owners plan to replicate the old exterior. "Maybe people love that metal façade, but I don't," Mr. Sapp said. "Our whole game plan from the beginning was to redo the façade completely and bring it back to the look of the early 1900s when it was built."


The current building


The original facade/what they want to recreate

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  #236  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2005, 1:48 AM
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ooms with a redo

Praetorian Building to become lofts, have exterior restored

11:58 PM CST on Thursday, March 3, 2005

By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News

When the Praetorian Building opened on Main Street in 1908, people paid a quarter to climb to the top floor and look out over downtown.

At 16 stories, it was the tallest building in Texas.

But the last office tenants of "the pioneer skyscraper of the Southwest" moved out in 1993.

Now a California investor has decided that the landmark could be a hit with loft apartment renters. 3J Development LLC of San Diego bought the Praetorian Building this week.

"It's not going to be sitting empty much longer," said 3J Development president Joseph Sapp. "We are not going to let it sit dormant but are going to move forward with the project."

The Praetorian is 3J Development's second buy in downtown Dallas. Mr. Sapp's development partner in the project is Don Cooksey of CGP LLP in California.

Last month, the commercial builder and investor purchased the mostly vacant 1600 Pacific tower. The 33-story, black glass tower will be turned into about 370 residential units.

The Praetorian Building and 1600 Pacific (formerly the LTV Building) are a block apart on the popular Stone Street Gardens mall.

Terms of the sale were not disclosed, but the Praetorian Building is valued at about $900,000 on the tax rolls. 3J Development bought it from a Singapore investor.

The Praetorian was built with an elaborate stone exterior. But the classical architecture was obliterated in the 1960s, when the building was "modernized" with a metal-and-glass exterior.

The new owners plan to replicate the old exterior. "Maybe people love that metal façade, but I don't," Mr. Sapp said. "Our whole game plan from the beginning was to redo the façade completely and bring it back to the look of the early 1900s when it was built."


The current building


The original facade/what they want to recreate
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  #237  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2005, 1:51 AM
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W Hotel as of 3/2 nearing half of its structural height

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  #238  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2005, 1:51 AM
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W Hotel as of 3/2 nearing half of its structural height

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  #239  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2005, 1:56 AM
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Posts: 1,619
Gables Uptown Park will get a differnt look from the original rendering

original



new rendering at the site



progress
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  #240  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2005, 1:56 AM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Dallas, Texas
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Gables Uptown Park will get a differnt look from the original rendering

original



new rendering at the site



progress
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