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Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 6:38 PM
mhays mhays is offline
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Seattle saw the biggest drop in per-household car ownership

The Seattle Times reports that 81% of Seattle households had a car in 2018, down three points from 2010. That was the fastest decline of any top-50 city per Census numbers.

The number of cars increased since the population was up 22%, so it's not all good. Gentrification might also have a role.

The drop is related to how we're growing. Most Seattle land is houses only, and growth gets concentrated into urban village nodes all over town (about 15% of the land). That means growth is mostly near decent bus service and sometimes rail. The heaviest growth is in greater Downtown and the U District, so a lot more commuters can walk. Meanwhile, any area with frequent transit (about 3/4 of all residents) can build much less parking in new projects, including fairly broad areas where none is needed. Per the Times in 2016, something like 0.6 parking spaces were getting built per housing unit in the denser areas, however they defined that at the time.

In the coming years, we'll get a lot more accessory units due to new legislation, and the 15% recently changed to be closer to 20% I'd guess. Many of the urban village areas have also been upzoned. Improvements in bus service mean more areas will have lower parking requirements. We'll simultaneously be able to spread growth a little more but build more intensively in the existing nodes.

Other cities such as Denver (90% in 2018), Miami (84%), and Boston (66%) saw substantial increases in households with cars. This is an interesting dynamic mixing the quality of transit, the availability of parking (including requirements and market expectations for new buildings), poverty in some cases, large student populations, and so on.
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  #2  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2019, 12:32 AM
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mSeattle mSeattle is offline
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Some of the hills aren't as dreaded as they once were, now that there are more powerful and more affordable (at least online) e-bikes and electric scooters. Oh, and bike alarms/locks and new buildings that include more bike parking/storage.
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Old Posted Nov 8, 2019, 12:49 AM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
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well thats good news and below the national average, but not really all that.

for example, in cleveland car ownership was 76.3% in 2016.

maybe generally higher car ownership is due to the relative wealth of seattle, or maybe its a western-eastern thing, i dk.
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Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 8:23 PM
mhays mhays is offline
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A new article outlines Seattle also posting the largest decline in car commuting from 2010 to 2018 per census numbers...though again, the number of car commuters actually grew because the population and worker counts both grew more.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle...walking-surge/

I'll say it again...our walking and transit number increases are about including buses in transit improvements, as well as infill that's centered in transit-served nodes vs. dispersed all over.

Numbers 2010 vs. 2018:
--Drive alone: 53.3 to 44.4%
--Transit: 18.2 to 23.1%
--Walk: 8.6 to 12.1%
--Work at home: 6.6 to 7.1%
--Carpool: 8.6 to 6.9%
--Bike: 3.6 to 3.8%
--Taxi, motorcyle, other: 1.1 to 1.9%
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Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 9:34 PM
lrt's friend lrt's friend is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays View Post
A new article outlines Seattle also posting the largest decline in car commuting from 2010 to 2018 per census numbers...though again, the number of car commuters actually grew because the population and worker counts both grew more.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle...walking-surge/

I'll say it again...our walking and transit number increases are about including buses in transit improvements, as well as infill that's centered in transit-served nodes vs. dispersed all over.

Numbers 2010 vs. 2018:
--Drive alone: 53.3 to 44.4%
--Transit: 18.2 to 23.1%
--Walk: 8.6 to 12.1%
--Work at home: 6.6 to 7.1%
--Carpool: 8.6 to 6.9%
--Bike: 3.6 to 3.8%
--Taxi, motorcyle, other: 1.1 to 1.9%
So I assume that real public transit improvements have been delivered rather than vanity projects that often cost a pile of money but sometimes results in worse overall service.

Vancouver has been experiencing similar benefits.
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Old Posted Nov 21, 2019, 10:27 PM
mhays mhays is offline
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Vancouver is way ahead of course.

Seattle is building a lot of rail, but that takes forever and it's still early. It's also been about adding/speeding buses, putting growth near transit (jobs and housing), not requiring parking in new buildings, and so on. (An initiative that would cut transportation taxes passed but is currently in the courts...might lose some bus service.)
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  #7  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2019, 2:17 AM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays View Post
A new article outlines Seattle also posting the largest decline in car commuting from 2010 to 2018 per census numbers...though again, the number of car commuters actually grew because the population and worker counts both grew more.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle...walking-surge/

I'll say it again...our walking and transit number increases are about including buses in transit improvements, as well as infill that's centered in transit-served nodes vs. dispersed all over.

Numbers 2010 vs. 2018:
--Drive alone: 53.3 to 44.4%
--Transit: 18.2 to 23.1%
--Walk: 8.6 to 12.1%
--Work at home: 6.6 to 7.1%
--Carpool: 8.6 to 6.9%
--Bike: 3.6 to 3.8%
--Taxi, motorcyle, other: 1.1 to 1.9%
Those numbers, they warm my heart.
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