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  #101  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2019, 3:02 AM
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Originally Posted by badrunner View Post
Houston today has that chaotic dystopian feel of LA in the 80s

Remember that movie Falling Down? If they made that movie today it would take place in Houston.
I can't see downtown Houston becoming like downtown LA. Downtown LA has fantastic bones. Apart from a few blocks of Main street, downtown Houston doesn't have much beyond corporate skyscrapers and surface parking.
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  #102  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2019, 3:52 AM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
I can't see downtown Houston becoming like downtown LA. Downtown LA has fantastic bones. Apart from a few blocks of Main street, downtown Houston doesn't have much beyond corporate skyscrapers and surface parking.
I hear that Houston, at least inside the 610 loop, is becoming denser and more infill is taking up some of those empty lots. That's a good start at least.
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  #103  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2019, 6:27 PM
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Originally Posted by TexasPlaya View Post
Obviously I didn’t walk over all of West LA like I haven’t walked over SW Houston...

SW Houston is huge geographically: major business districts like Galleria/Uptown, Greenway, and Texas Medical Center with major neighborhoods like Bellaire, W. University, Meyerland, Sharpstown, and Westbury. Obviously lesser known neighborhoods....

I’m not arguing they are facsimiles, just they have more in common than your average person would think.
No they don't, not really. Houston has more similarities to Atlanta, Dallas, Phoenix than it does Los Angeles. I have had to spend time working out of Houston and Atlanta and once lived in Phoenix for a short period of time and they feel more similar to me.

Los Angeles and San Francisco are very different cities but living in both for the last 5 years I find a lot more similarities between the 2 of them than I ever would Los Angeles to Houston.
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  #104  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2019, 7:17 AM
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I hope not. Houston/Dallas are not what I want to see as the biggest cities of America. They have no urban street life. Check out those driving vids on utube and you'll see, nobody on the street in the middle of the weekend afternoon. Shocking.
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  #105  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2019, 7:22 AM
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Originally Posted by aquablue View Post
I hope not. Houston/Dallas are not what I want to see as the biggest cities of America. They have no urban street life. Check out those driving vids on utube and you'll see, nobody on the street in the middle of the weekend afternoon. Shocking.
Sadly this is true. For such a large metro area, it's pretty dead with minimal street life. Downtown and Midtown are largely subdued when there's not a Rockets/ Astros game or a convention. Although downtown was kind of active tonight when my wife and were out for a few drinks.
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  #106  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 11:09 PM
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No they don't, not really. Houston has more similarities to Atlanta, Dallas, Phoenix than it does Los Angeles. I have had to spend time working out of Houston and Atlanta and once lived in Phoenix for a short period of time and they feel more similar to me.

Los Angeles and San Francisco are very different cities but living in both for the last 5 years I find a lot more similarities between the 2 of them than I ever would Los Angeles to Houston.
Yes they do, really from my experiences. Also I wasn't saying that Houston and LA are the most closely related cities out of all pairings either.
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  #107  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 11:39 PM
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I'll put this out there one more time. A Houston resident or an LA resident visiting Houston might find themselves in some pocket of Houston that somehow reminds them of LA. Very few people familiar with Houston would have a similar experience in LA. LA just does not remind people of Houston.
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  #108  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 11:58 PM
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I'll put this out there one more time. A Houston resident or an LA resident visiting Houston might find themselves in some pocket of Houston that somehow reminds them of LA. Very few people familiar with Houston would have a similar experience in LA. LA just does not remind people of Houston.
No one is really claiming they are but even if they did, their opinion is no less valid.
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  #109  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 2:46 AM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Sadly this is true. For such a large metro area, it's pretty dead with minimal street life. Downtown and Midtown are largely subdued when there's not a Rockets/ Astros game or a convention. Although downtown was kind of active tonight when my wife and were out for a few drinks.
Houston wasn't built to be a urban enthusiast paradise. If only there was no such thing as hurricanes, Galveston would be a board favorite.
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  #110  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 2:54 AM
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Originally Posted by austlar1 View Post
I'll put this out there one more time. A Houston resident or an LA resident visiting Houston might find themselves in some pocket of Houston that somehow reminds them of LA. Very few people familiar with Houston would have a similar experience in LA. LA just does not remind people of Houston.
I've spent significant time in both. Except for a few LA-centric city types, LA is nothing of a traditional urban city, in part because you can't separate LA from it's metro area (and the Western I.E.) and particularly LA County. There's too much cross-commuter interaction and too many spread out common points of interest.

Other than the flora, elevation and topography, Houston and LA actually share a lot in common. Take that from someone with years of active living experiences in both areas.
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  #111  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 4:04 PM
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Just because LA isn't a traditional city doesn't mean it automatically resembles Phoenix, Atlanta, Houston or Dallas.

It's something of a outlier, it really looks like neither. After viewing these other sunbelt cities in real life or on google maps, it's hard to find comparable LA neighborhoods in those places. Unless you're talking about far flung areas like Warner Center or Granada Hills.
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  #112  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 4:08 PM
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West LA is massive. Melrose , Beverly Hills, 3rd, Fairfax, and West Hollywood are part of West LA for most people.
West LA is only west of the 405 and north of 90. Lately it's creeping east to La Cienega and even La Brea. Heck Inglewood and Culver City people are claiming west side till they die now. There's just a different feel west of the 405. The weather is cooler, thicker marine layer, etc.

I've never considered BH or WeHo as West LA. They have their own distinct feels and are separate cities. They also have walkable vibrant districts. West LA has a couple (like Sawtelle) but most people just go to Santa Monica or Venice.
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  #113  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 4:18 PM
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It's different for people. I consider the westside of LA anything west of La Brea, and many do. Everything looks a bit older, more history east of La Brea. Hollywood, East Hollywood, Hancok Park etc. West of La Brea is the "newer" part of the city.
Some think it's Fairfax or La Cienga. Either way, there's tons of people walking around those shopping districts.
By your logic, Century City isn't west LA? Then what is it? Bel Air and Westwood aren't?

West Hollywood and Beverly Hills are certainly part of the westside of LA, I don't think most people would disagree with that.
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  #114  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 4:38 PM
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
It's different for people. I consider the westside of LA anything west of La Brea, and many do. Everything looks a bit older, more history east of La Brea. Hollywood, East Hollywood, Hancok Park etc. West of La Brea is the "newer" part of the city.
Some think it's Fairfax or La Cienga. Either way, there's tons of people walking around those shopping districts.
By your logic, Century City isn't west LA? Then what is it? Bel Air and Westwood aren't?

West Hollywood and Beverly Hills are certainly part of the westside of LA, I don't think most people would disagree with that.
Bel-Air isn't in West LA but Brentwood is. The best weather in all of the LA Basin is probably in Brentwood. Westwood is fine if you want to use Westwood Bl as the defining line instead of the 405. I understand why people want to expand the West LA neighborhood boundaries because it's the trendiest neighborhood. At the end of the day, just semantics here.
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  #115  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 4:50 PM
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That's true, but as far as I've known Beverly Hills and Century City were always part of westside LA. It's not a new thing. All those upscale stores on Robertson, 3rd, Beverly etc have been there for decades.
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  #116  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 8:03 PM
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"West Los Angeles" is a section of the city of Los Angeles with its own post office, LAPD substation, branch library, and courthouse. West Los Angeles is mostly west of the 405, south of Wilshire, north of Olympic, and east of Santa Monica city limits. When I lived there, my official postal address was "West Los Angeles, California," although most mail that just said "Los Angeles" would make it through. Some did not.

The "Westside" is a more amorphous term that people usually use to describe a sprawling set of LA districts, unincorporated county areas, and independent cities roughly between West Hollywood and the ocean, from the Santa Monica Mountains south to maybe Culver Boulevard. When you live on the Westside, your official postal address is specific to the community in which you live, such as Brentwood.
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  #117  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2019, 1:29 AM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
As someone who lives in Houston. If it became the largest city (metro) in the US, it would become an overcrowded hellscape of epic proportions.
I was in Houston for work this past week and we landed just as rush hour began on Monday afternoon and it was a maddening crawl on the Loop 8 from Bush to the hotel in the Westchase section of Houston. I don't know how youse deal with that traffic on a daily basis. I thought suburban Philly traffic was bad...but it's a walk in the park in comparison.
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  #118  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2019, 2:58 AM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
I've spent significant time in both. Except for a few LA-centric city types, LA is nothing of a traditional urban city, in part because you can't separate LA from it's metro area (and the Western I.E.) and particularly LA County. There's too much cross-commuter interaction and too many spread out common points of interest.

Other than the flora, elevation and topography, Houston and LA actually share a lot in common. Take that from someone with years of active living experiences in both areas.
Okay, maybe Houston looks vaguely similar to the eastern Los Angeles County cities of Pamona and West Covina or OC cities like Anaheim and Santa Ana even though these suburban cities outside Los Angeles are more than twice as dense as Houston.
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  #119  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2019, 3:59 AM
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If you mashed up Miami, Detroit and Houston, you'd get something vaguely resembling LA. But Houston would make up the least interesting portion of that city.
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  #120  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2019, 7:07 AM
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Almost every city on the globe, got to where it is today by its geographic location. New York is the center of the east coast, Los Angeles is the center of the west coast. Chicago is the center of the Great Lakes and Houston is the center of the oil shales. It would take a big event to shift the center of the American economy to Texas but Texas is already one of the most important parts of the economy of the nation even if it isn’t the number one economic centers.
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