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  #41  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 6:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Dariusb View Post
Wasn't Los Angeles at one time like Houston is today? Isn't it possible that it can mature density like LA has?
Not really because LA is older and was built up much earlier...well before cars were around. That head start made a world of difference. We focus on all of their freeways but they have a crap ton of older walkable areas we can never replicate here.
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  #42  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 1:33 PM
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As we are talking so much about Texas lately, I have a question. I noticed Tarrant and Dallas counties has exactly the same size. Between 2000-2010, population in Tarrant has grown much faster than Dallas. Impressive 25.1% vs anemic 6.7%.

What's the explanation? Just the fact of more land available for exurban growth in Tarrant or there were also other factors explaining this gap?
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  #43  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 1:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Dariusb View Post
Wasn't Los Angeles at one time like Houston is today? Isn't it possible that it can mature density like LA has?
LA has always had a higher density core. And the density is more due to household size than built form.
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  #44  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 1:35 PM
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Originally Posted by yuriandrade View Post
As we are talking so much about Texas lately, I have a question. I noticed Tarrant and Dallas counties has exactly the same size. Between 2000-2010, population in Tarrant has grown much faster than Dallas. Impressive 25.1% vs anemic 6.7%.

What's the explanation? Just the fact of more land available for exurban growth in Tarrant or there were also other factors explaining this gap?
Tarrant is a cheap county with land for growth, Dallas, comparatively isn't. Americans will drive further for a big, cheap house.

Basically Tarrant is the "Sunbelt" of Dallas.
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  #45  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 1:47 PM
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And does Fort Worth manage to be a city on its own, a job magnet with a decent urban life or Dallas is strong enough to eclipse it completely?
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  #46  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 2:13 PM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yuriandrade View Post
As we are talking so much about Texas lately, I have a question. I noticed Tarrant and Dallas counties has exactly the same size. Between 2000-2010, population in Tarrant has grown much faster than Dallas. Impressive 25.1% vs anemic 6.7%.

What's the explanation? Just the fact of more land available for exurban growth in Tarrant or there were also other factors explaining this gap?
Dallas (city and county) has been growing slightly for awhile now. The outlying areas are the ones that have grown the most recently.

Thank God I don't have to remember so many DFW suburb names as I used to, it gets old after awhile.
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  #47  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 2:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Tarrant is a cheap county with land for growth, Dallas, comparatively isn't. Americans will drive further for a big, cheap house.

Basically Tarrant is the "Sunbelt" of Dallas.
Additionally, South Dallas (County) is mostly socioeconomically depressed, so because of the circumstances, it discourages growth in a would be growth area.
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  #48  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 2:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
LA has always had a higher density core. And the density is more due to household size than built form.
But even factoring out the large household sizes, the built density is suggestive of like 20-25K per mile.


Hunter Kerhart
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  #49  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 2:30 PM
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Originally Posted by yuriandrade View Post
And does Fort Worth manage to be a city on its own, a job magnet with a decent urban life or Dallas is strong enough to eclipse it completely?
Fort Worth is the St. Paul to Dallas' Minneapolis. Strong enough to be a core, stand alone city but still overshadowed. Call it a waxing gibbeous moon or a partial eclipse.
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  #50  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2019, 6:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yuriandrade View Post
As we are talking so much about Texas lately, I have a question. I noticed Tarrant and Dallas counties has exactly the same size. Between 2000-2010, population in Tarrant has grown much faster than Dallas. Impressive 25.1% vs anemic 6.7%.

What's the explanation? Just the fact of more land available for exurban growth in Tarrant or there were also other factors explaining this gap?
Significant economic drivers in northeastern Tarrant County (DFW Airport, Alliance Airport (air freight, logistics), and other large employers coupled with nearby affordable housing options have brought in a lot of population growth. Denton County just to the north of Tarrant County has also exploded with population growth. As for Fort Worth, it has it's own strong local economy that operates rather independently of Dallas. Lots of local wealth and lots of jobs.

Last edited by austlar1; Nov 2, 2019 at 6:23 PM.
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  #51  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 2:10 PM
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Hahaha yea right!!
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  #52  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 3:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
Dallas (city and county) has been growing slightly for awhile now. The outlying areas are the ones that have grown the most recently.

Thank God I don't have to remember so many DFW suburb names as I used to, it gets old after awhile.
I've heard that south Dallas(city) may reverse that trend especially the area south of downtown.
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  #53  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 5:01 PM
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And does Fort Worth manage to be a city on its own, a job magnet with a decent urban life or Dallas is strong enough to eclipse it completely?
Dallas -Ft. Worth are almost twin-cities. I think Dallas will always be dominant but they are so close together that really they are one giant urban agglomeration generally just called "Dallas"
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  #54  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 6:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
Dallas -Ft. Worth are almost twin-cities. I think Dallas will always be dominant but they are so close together that really they are one giant urban agglomeration generally just called "Dallas"
Most people don't call that area "Dallas" unless what they are referencing is on the Dallas side of the Metroplex.
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  #55  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 6:55 PM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Most people don't call that area "Dallas" unless what they are referencing is on the Dallas side of the Metroplex.
Most people as in Texans, or everyone else? I've traveled to Dallas more times than I can even remember and I almost exclusively say "Dallas"... But I'm not from Texas. I've only stumbled into Forth Worth once, though.
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  #56  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 11:00 PM
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Tokyo is a “monocentric metro area”. Maybe there’s a definitional point that I’m missing.
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  #57  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 11:15 PM
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Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
Most people as in Texans, or everyone else? I've traveled to Dallas more times than I can even remember and I almost exclusively say "Dallas"... But I'm not from Texas. I've only stumbled into Forth Worth once, though.
Dallas does overshadow FW nationally but i suspect that's due to the Cowboys and J.R. Ewing. I never been to Minneapolis but I realize there is a whole other large city right next to it. I never call the twin cities "Minneapolis" unless I'm referring to Minneapolis specifically.
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  #58  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 11:19 PM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Dallas does overshadow FW nationally but i suspect that's due to the Cowboys and J.R. Ewing. I never been to Minneapolis but I realize there is a whole other large city right next to it. I never call the twin cities "Minneapolis" unless I'm referring to Minneapolis specifically.
and minneapolis doesn't even get the brand bump from major league sports team names. they all go with "minnesota" so as not to upset anyone in st. paul.

Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Vikings
Minnesota Timberwolves
Minnesota Wild
Minnesota United FC
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  #59  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 3:00 AM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is online now
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That and Minneapolis is a whole lot of syllables. Makes me wonder why the Colts are named exactly for the similarly named Indianapolis.

Last edited by ThePhun1; Nov 5, 2019 at 4:04 PM.
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  #60  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 7:28 AM
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What if nothing? Nothing would happen if either of those cities became "largest."
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