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  #261  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2004, 8:18 AM
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here's a development:
i'm staying in town!
can't get rid of ol' cubercle that easy! hey!
sorry! HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

by the way, i was going to be moving away.
which most of you probably didn't even know.
okay! lock n' load!
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  #262  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2004, 8:24 AM
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Naw, we knew. You were gonna buy a snooty condo in Chicago and morph into a total snob.
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  #263  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2004, 3:38 PM
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What is "outdoor lifestyle space"?
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  #264  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2004, 5:55 AM
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A few days ago the Journal Sentinel ran an excellent article about the transformation of the Walker's Point/Fifth Ward neighborhood. It covered everything from all the little shops/restaurants/bars that have opened up in the neighborhood, to the many residential projects that have been recently completed, to the upcoming proposals on the horizon. The article also touches on the concerns residents, developers/architects, politicians, and business owners have over the future of the neighborhood.

Take some time to read it: Urban makeover - With condos, restaurants going up in Fifth Ward, tension builds over character of redevelopment



^ This map from the article shows and describes the recent development action in the Fifth Ward. Momentum is building!

***

And speaking of Fifth Ward development, a Common Council committee (Zoning, Neighborhoods, and Development) gave preliminary approval for First Place on the River--a project recently proposed by the Key Bridge Group. The site is located at a prominent location at the confluence of the Milwaukee and Menomonee Rivers, near 1st and W. Seeboth Streets. Developers plan to rehabilitate the former 4-story Terminal Storage warehouse, plus an 8-story addition, to create 180 condo units.

Key Bridge is working with the Department of City Development to refine the current design, but as always, there are some who have concerns over the propsal's scale and appearance (which was also addressed in the previous article). The proposal will go before the full Common Council for approval in the near future.

Also, the ZND Committee recommended permanent historic status to a small warehouse building next door, which Weas Development had planned to demolish to make way for an 8-story condo/retail project called 100 Seeboth. While this action effectively kills the proposal, it must also be approved by the full Common Council at a later date.

Check out the Journal Sentinel article for detailed information: Fifth Ward plan moves forward - City panel backs one condo development, opposes another in historic building



^ A rendering of First Place on the River, at the point where the Milwaukee River (foreground) and Menomonee River (right background) meet. The project involves rehabbing the lower 4-stories of an existing warehouse, plus several additions of varying heights (plus boat docks and a new riverwalk).

***

On the other end of Downtown, the ZND Committee recommended the Common Council should deny temporary historic status to a portion of the Milwaukee Center for Independence. This would allow developers to move forward with plans to demolish the building to make way for their proposed mixed-use project consiting of an 8-sotry building and 20 brownstone-style lofts. This matter is also on the agenda for a full Common Council meeting later this month.

Review the for and against positions in this Journal Sentinel article: Condo plan gets boost from city - Committee backs demolishing building
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  #265  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2004, 3:50 PM
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I like what's going on in Milwaukee's Fifth Ward area. . .
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  #266  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2004, 8:39 PM
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looks good, i like the design. glad to see change on the horizon...
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  #267  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2004, 3:59 AM
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Downtown's housing boom continues, with two more conversion projects!

Work is already in progress inside the Wisconsin Tower (aka 606 Building), where the 22-story former office building (a great art deco piece) will be converted into a mixed-use building. Renovation started earlier this week to create 70 condo units, two floors of retail space, and underground parking within the building.

This Journal Sentinel article covers this building, and reviews other renovation work going on along W. Wisconsin Avenue: Wisconsin Ave. office tower is going condo



^ The Wisconsin Tower, 606 West Wisconsin Avenue.

***

The Gallun family, which owns the former A.F. Gallun & Sons Company tannery, has proposed converting the complex into condominiums. The tannery buildings are located on the Lower East Side, between N. Water Street and the Milwaukee River, just north of E. Brady Street. The Galluns are planning to create 250 to 300 condo units, to be developed in phases as the housing market demands. Also, 40,000 square feet of retail space on the lower level is planned.

This area has been a hot spot for residential projects in recent years, both new construction and conversions. The Galluns already redeveloped a portion of the tannery a few years ago into apartments--which they now plan to upgrade into condominums (in addition to this most recent condo proposal).

Alderman D'Amato would like plans to include public access to the river, via a street or lane (similar to streets along canals in Europe), which would link up with the city's ever-growing RiverWalk.

Read more about it in the Journal Sentinel: Tannery to become housing - Condo project targets big downtown demand



^ A view of the former Gallun tannery, looking south down N. Water Street.
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  #268  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2004, 4:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom In Chicago
I like what's going on in Milwaukee's Fifth Ward area. . .
Milwaukee is quite the boom city and is clearly becoming one of the better, in the league of a handful, urban cities in the U.S. You should check it out. I especially like the East Side and the awesome Lakefront, from the East Side to Bayview, which Milwaukee has painstakingly fixed up or is fixing up. Great job Milwaukee.
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  #269  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2004, 5:45 AM
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I read the Fifth Ward article in the paper this morning over breakfast. (I was in Eagle River over the weekend.) As far as names go, I'd prefer that the area remain "Walker's Point." Not only would it provide distinction from the Third Ward across the river, it's also a nod to one of the city's three founders; it's a little piece of Milwaukee history.
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  #270  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2004, 8:00 PM
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Question!

- That great building on the southwest corner of North and Humboldt appears to still be vacant. When is someone going to make that place into something? Otherwise I'm going to have to come up there and buy the damn thing. It is simply too badass.
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  #271  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2004, 2:46 PM
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I feel like I'm talking to myself, but whatever.


This may be relatively old news, but I recently read that the abandoned warehouse on Humboldt between Locust and Chambers (near the outdoor volleyball courts) has been bought by Alterra and will be completely renovated as an industrial-ish coffeeshop thing.
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  #272  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2004, 4:09 AM
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Damn Milwaukee!

See, now y'all are on my "must see" list.... I need to see this stuff in person. There's a lot of true urban development - rehab, reno, and new construction - going on. These must be exciting times for you!

If not, you've got someone in Michigan who's excited for you. I love progressive cities.

Our Time is Now!

Calcasieu
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  #273  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2004, 9:59 PM
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Redevelopment momentum from Walker's Point is slowly making its way westward, as reported in the Journal Sentinel recently. Old industrial buildings and warehouses are being converted into new residential, retail, and office uses along a stretch of W. Pierce Street, between S. 12th and S. 16th Streets. Some of the recent and upcoming reinvestment throughout the neighborhood include: several artist studios, a high-end antique gallery, a furniture restoration business, and expansion for an existing commerical kitchen business, and a new headquarters for the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Wisconsin.

Here's the article from the Journal Sentinel: Industry yields to retail along Pierce St. - Five-block area on near south side being reborn, a building here, another there

Last edited by Markitect; Aug 15, 2004 at 10:06 PM.
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  #274  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2004, 11:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theodore
Question!
That great building on the southwest corner of North and Humboldt appears to still be vacant.
answer!!

friends of mine have occupied the second and third floors of that building for years!

weird mannequin in second story window courtesy of scott.
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  #275  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2004, 12:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cubercle
Quote:
Originally Posted by theodore
Question!
That great building on the southwest corner of North and Humboldt appears to still be vacant.
answer!!

friends of mine have occupied the second and third floors of that building for years!

weird mannequin in second story window courtesy of scott.
I drove by that building a million times and always wondered about it. Did you ever venture into the lower floors, that would be sommething I would love to do. This is the building right across from the Jewel/Osco? What is the story behind that building?

There was another empty house kitty corner to that building that seemed to have some big parties in it anyone have information on that house? There is beside that house a big cememnt lot with what looks like a place were trucks backed into to drop or pick things up. What is the history behind that?
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  #276  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2004, 3:23 AM
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My dad grew up in that neighborhood. The cool-looking building on the southwest corner of Humboldt/North at one time was a neighborhood drug store, I believe (at least in the 1950s). The exterior looks like it's been painted recently, and it looks like some interior renovation work is going on, judging from the step ladders and stuff visible thorugh the windows.

Kitty-corner to that, on the northeast corner, there seems to have been just a paved empty lot with a small building on it--maybe a gas station at one time, judging by a 1968 aerial photo I have of the neighborhood.

A little ways to the east, toward the river, there was a cement supply company and a small fuel supply facility. Across the street, where the Jewel-Osco now stands, was once the Humbolt Yard of the Milwaukee Road railroad.
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  #277  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2004, 1:17 AM
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judging by a 1968 aerial photo I have of the neighborhood.
Can you post that arial?

I guess I shouldn't have said kitty corner when trying to describe the house. It is almost kitty corner. The house I was talking about, I think there are two it would be the one to the west of the first house, are just before the vacant area where it looked liked trucks used to drop off and pick stuff up, is just before the bridge on the north side of North Avenue. If that makes any sense. I have always wondered what that land was and the story behind the party house.



Just to the east
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  #278  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2004, 3:19 PM
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below is a travel article from the chicago tribune about brew-city, i thought you milwaukeeans might be interested in reading it. it's kinda stupid and makes sweeping generalizations just like every other travel article that's ever been written, but the overall tone is still very positive and upbeat about the revitalization of milwaukee.


Happy days--and nights--in surprising Milwaukee

By Mary Morris
Special to the Tribune
Published August 15, 2004

MILWAUKEE -- As we drive past the stone mansions, some with impeccable gardens terraced into the hillside, a glistening blue-green sea and white beaches below, I try to remember where I am. The Amalfi Coast, Northern California, even the Riviera come to mind.

But this is Milwaukee--a town I'd typecast for its beer drinking, sports fans with cheese wedges on their heads and TV sitcoms ("Laverne and Shirley," "Happy Days"). A town that would prove me wrong.

Last year my parents moved to Milwaukee to be near my brother. My father, who was nearing 100, had spent his entire life in Chicago. What would he do without Chicago's clubs and fancy restaurants, gritty politics and ceramic cows? As for my mother, I could not imagine her away from Michigan Avenue.

But they began to rave about the city, so I thought I'd give it a try.

On a flawless May morning, my husband and I pull up in front of the Pfister Hotel, one of the premier hotels in the Midwest and Milwaukee's oldest. Hopeful sports fans, clutching baseball memorabilia, crane their necks to see if we are San Diego Padres. We enter the stunning three-story, barrel-vaulted Victorian lobby where a child's smiley-face balloon floats among the angels.

After checking into a spacious room with a view of the lake, my husband and I do what we like to do best: We take a walk. We head east along Wisconsin Avenue toward the 1982 orange sculpture by Mark di Suvero, "The Calling," at the avenue's end. Then we see, rising against the blue sky and the lakefront, the magnificent Calatrava addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum.

A warm breeze blows as we approach the bridge that leads to this piece of pure white architecture with its angelic white wings called the brise soleil. Already tourists are lined up on the bridge and the ramparts leading to the museum, for it is the designated hour when the wings begin to open.

And at the appointed time they do, slowly, like a great bird poised for flight. We stand in awe as these wings, intended to allow filtered light into the museum, extend themselves against the horizon. (The wings open when the museum does--10 a.m.--and close when it closes--5 p.m. daily, except Thursdays when closing is 8 p.m.; they also "flap"--close and open--at noon every day.)

We descend to the street level and enter the museum. The entrance hall with the Calder mobile floating overhead, the pure white marble floor, the expansive room and unobstructed views of the lake give one the impression that a miracle is being performed here. Walking into the museum, it feels as if we are actually walking on water.

Finnish architect Eero Saarinen built the original War Memorial Center of the Milwaukee Art Museum in 1957. When the new addition was planned for what is called the Quadracci Pavilion, every major architect in the world, including Frank Gehry (who wanted to create an American Bilbao here), sought the job. Santiago Calatrava, a great admirer of his mentor Saarinen, won and built a splendid white ship, an ark complete with wings, made of steel and reinforced concrete (one of Calatrava's preferred materials).

In the Pop Art section of the gallery I pause in front of a large painting by Tom Wesselmann, titled "Still Life #51." It is an image of an orange bowling ball beside a giant Pabst beer can.

As I learn from friends in town who pride themselves on being local historians, this museum isn't the start but the culmination of good urban planning that began a century ago with architects such as Daniel Burnham, Alfred Clas and Frederick Law Olmsted. It continued in 1981 when the City Council decided not to run a freeway along Milwaukee's lakefront; the Calatrava addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum sits where that freeway would have been.

We stop for a visit with my parents, who live just off the lake. Afterwards we continue our walk along the lakefront, first heading to the grounds where Summerfest (and many other events) are held. Once this was a dumping ground for a Nike missile base, an airfield, railroad tracks, a shooting range and huge parking lots. Now there are miles of public walkways, bicycle rentals, a marina. A former pumping station along Lincoln Memorial Drive has been reincarnated as a cafe called Alterra. Milwaukee's backyard, one city planner noted, has now become its front yard.

Walking to Veterans Park, we pass the kite-flying school, which is closed, then cut past a pond dotted with paddleboats.

We drive farther north to Lake Park, a classic Olmsted park, which remains much as he intended it. Built on high ground, this small park traverses the deep ravines carved by glaciers long ago.

At Atwater Beach, we park on Lake Drive and walk down many steps to get to the beach. The water is too cold for swimming, but flopping on our towels, we end the day there.

That night my brother and his wife take us to Coerper's Five O'Clock Club, a quintessential Midwestern steak house far to the west. In the dim, smoky restaurant, which probably hasn't been redecorated since the late '50s, an Elvis impersonator sits at the table behind us. We try not to stare as my brother considers the 30-oz. steak with onion rings.

Big portions. Big chairs (the Blue Dawg Bagel on Farwell Avenue, with armchairs you can stretch out in). Big buildings (the Allen-Bradley Clock Tower, with the largest--bigger than Big Ben--four-sided clock in the world). The biggest (and best) circus parade.

For dessert we head out to Kopp's in Glendale, to sample the world-famous frozen custard. Though it has been Kopp's since the early 1970s, it has another claim to fame: This was once the site of the Milky Way diner, a hangout for one of the creators of "Happy Days."

We enjoy our frozen custard while admiring a giant sculpture of a red spoon with a cherry in it. It's a copy of a sculpture by Claes Oldenburg that sits in the sculpture garden at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. Oldenburg's first wife, Patty, was a girl from South Milwaukee who sewed his soft sculptures.

Driving down Juneau Avenue early the next morning, we pass the old Blatz brewery. Ahead of us is the abandoned Pabst brewery. We are heading for the RiverWalk along the Milwaukee River. Once an oily waterway, bordered by forbidding gray buildings, its banks now harbor charming two-story town-houses, complete with private docks, and restaurants with names like the Ocean Club and Third Street Pier. Families of ducks and a small yacht float by.

At the end of the l9th Century, the architects Burnham and Clas recommended that both Chicago and Milwaukee build river walks. Chicago built Wacker Drive, but Milwaukee's plans took another 80 years. And now it is completed.

We circle back along 3rd Street, an "old Milwaukee" street that has been home to the Usinger's Famous Sausage factory since 1880. Old-style German buildings--and the famed Mader's restaurant--remain perfectly preserved. To see a Chicago street that looks like this you have to go to the Old Chicago exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry. In Milwaukee, you can just walk along 3rd Street and have a burger too.

From the RiverWalk we drive over to the Historic 3rd Ward, just south of downtown. Here markets have been converted into art galleries and boutiques, and a school for art and design has recently opened. But this neighborhood of cobbled streets came into its own when the Broadway Theater Center opened about five years ago as the umbrella company for three venues: Skylight Opera, Chamber Theater (for traditional theater) and Theater X (an experimental venue, which recently staged a successful run of "Chomsky 9/11").

We end our morning at Sanford D'Amato's Cafe Coquette in the Historic 3rd Ward with lunch.

After an afternoon with my parents at their Prospect Avenue home, we walk back to the hotel. We pass old Victorian mansions, then turn up Knapp Street. After a stop for a Guinness at a charming Irish pub and B&B called County Clare (traditional Irish music and corned beef on Saturday nights), we continue along Astor Street.

Here we get a full appreciation of the yellowish-white bricks that gave Milwaukee its Cream City nickname. In the 1850s brick manufacturers were disappointed when their bricks didn't come out the usual red. But after a while the local brickmakers appreciated the uniqueness of the color, and many Milwaukee buildings were built with this pale-baked clay.

Along Juneau Avenue we pause to admire All Saints Episcopal Cathedral Complex with its English Gothic Revival church and eight-sided steeple. Then we come to Cathedral Square, a lively square lined with trendy restaurants and St. John's Roman Catholic Cathedral.

That night we have a five-star dining experience at Sanford, the premier restaurant of Sanford D'Amato--the chef Julia Child picked to cook for her 85th birthday. We are pleasantly surprised that the three-course tasting menu is only $45. I savor the crayfish ravioli in won-ton soup with pepper, fennel and anise; the loin of elk in cranberry sauce; and, for dessert, the cannoli with Grand Marnier and a poppyseed cookie.

The day ends at the Blu bar on the 23rd floor of the Pfister, which features live jazz and wrap-around windows. The San Diego Padres are there. I can't remember if they'd lost or won, but our mood was high as we drank blue martinis up in the sky.

Why I have fallen in love with Milwaukee is no mystery. Milwaukee is the kind of straightforward, dignified Midwestern city I remember from my childhood--a good place to enjoy the expanse of inland sea known as Lake Michigan, to get a steak and a beer, to talk with friends over coffee, to live a well-appointed, even elegant life.

Yet it has not lost its whimsical, childlike feel. On our last morning we head to the kite school on the lake, now in full flight. Along the lakefront gulls dive for fish, sailboats skitter past. In the distance we spot a schooner with five sails to the wind. The playing fields of Veterans Park are filled with picnickers and soccer games. Two men perform acrobatics with a frisbee.

Above us a white crane kite soars like a sea bird against the pale blue sky.

- - -

MORE SIGHTS

Milwaukee has many more attractions than what is mentioned in the main story. Among them:

- The Milwaukee Public Museum, best known for its "Streets of Old Milwaukee" exhibit and as the museum that first incorporated the diorama into exhibits.

- The Milwaukee County Zoo, often described as one of the best in the country.

- The Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory ("the Domes"), with desert, tropical and temperate walk-through environments.

- Miller Park, home to baseball's Brewers with a fan-like, retractable dome.

- You also can tour the Miller Brewery or Sprecher Brewery (a microbrewery that also makes gourmet sodas).

INFORMATION

Contact the Greater Milwaukee Convention and Visitors Bureau at 800-554-1448; www.milwaukee.org.

-- M.M.


Copyright © 2004, Chicago Tribune
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  #279  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2004, 12:24 AM
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It is only 20 dollars to get to Milwaukee by train from Chicago. The train will let you off a little bit South of downtown. I highly recommend any Chicagoan get on that train and walk about Milwaukee. Downtown has tons of construction and beautiful architecture, the East Side will be everyone's favorite neighborhood, and the lakefront is awesome.

Do I remember correctly that the old coast guard station on the lakefront is being redeveloped?

Stop in a local Milwaukee bar and have some bears especially Brady Street area or North Ave. area. Remember this is Milwaukee so instead of Old Style have a Miller product one of the many micro brews which seem to be more prolific than Chicago.

The last train back to Chicago is at 7:30pm, that sucks, but the day trip is well worth it and cheap.

Those are my plans for Thursday.
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  #280  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2004, 1:29 PM
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Why does every article about Milwaukee have to mention Happy Days and Laverne & Shirley?
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