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  #61  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2019, 11:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Yes.
Dcreid.
Oh ok, he kind of sort of said that in the form of a hypothetical question. I do think it is possible for DFW and/or Metro Houston to pass Chicagoland in 30 years. Los Angeles MSA/CSA would be a hard no.

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Originally Posted by DCReid View Post
A more interesting question will be whether the Texas metros of DFW and Houston pass LA and Chicago over the next 30 years. Or whether they will hit a growth plateau like LA has (i.e., grow more slowly). And how big will Austin metro get; whether it will surpass all Midwestern metros except Chicago.
     
     
  #62  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2019, 11:33 PM
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La with all it's traffic problems, still is in a different league with infrastructure compared
To those places.
No idea how Dallas and houston can hit 12 million and not be a hellish disaster.
I don't know.


Dallas has a huge head start in terms of development of an expansive mass transit system than LA did. Remember, LA didn't have a single rail line in a city/metro of 10 million+. Dallas already has this at much smaller population figure.

CAHSR is basically dead in LA, while Texas moves along in their plans. -- or at least last time I checked?
     
     
  #63  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 12:40 AM
JAYNYC JAYNYC is offline
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
What's the draw in Texas besides col?
Not much.
Spoken like a true coastal elitist.

Methinks you should inform yourself.
     
     
  #64  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 12:43 AM
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Originally Posted by JAYNYC View Post
Spoken like a true coastal elitist.

Methinks you should inform yourself.
Texas does have a huge coastline with ports of incredible significance to the US economy.
     
     
  #65  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 12:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
I don't know.


Dallas has a huge head start in terms of development of an expansive mass transit system than LA did. Remember, LA didn't have a single rail line in a city/metro of 10 million+. Dallas already has this at much smaller population figure.

CAHSR is basically dead in LA, while Texas moves along in their plans. -- or at least last time I checked?
I wasn't thinking about transit, more the amount of freeway miles and surface streets (that actually moves traffic) where LA wipes the floor with both of them. LA's bus service is massive, as well as many of the suburbs offering their own busy systems.

What's the percentage of people using transit in LA, Houston or Dallas? It's not high, so where these cities are with transit is kinda moot.
     
     
  #66  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 12:50 AM
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Originally Posted by JAYNYC View Post
Spoken like a true coastal elitist.

Methinks you should inform yourself.
Like you did with the restaurant scene? Yea....um...

I spent ten years in Chicago, and visited many midwest cities. I found many of them interesting (Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Madison, Cincinnati), so no.

I get annoyed when Texas (usually) posters try to talk down LA/California in an a effort to pump their cities.

Last edited by LA21st; Oct 20, 2019 at 1:09 AM.
     
     
  #67  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 1:10 AM
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Like you did with the restaurant scene? Yea, no thanks.
No.

Like most Americans who don't live in a certain holier-than-thou, detached from reality, faux pleasantville bubble West Coast state not named Oregon or Washington (that, not for nothing, happens to be hemmorhaging residents to that "other" state for reasons beyond COL).

Mmmmkay?
     
     
  #68  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 1:12 AM
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
I get annoyed when Texas (usually) posters try to talk down LA/California in an a effort to pump their cities.
Yeah, I live in NYC.

You know, a place where most people tend to speak from an informed perspective.

Try again?
     
     
  #69  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 1:14 AM
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Lol. Whatever
The Texas pride has been real for decades and it always shows on these types of forums. But because you have some attachment to the place, it's ok for your narrative.

Got it. Texas Pride is way more evident than any California "elitism".
     
     
  #70  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 1:15 AM
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Originally Posted by JAYNYC View Post
Yeah, I live in NYC.

You know, a place where most people tend to speak from an informed perspective.

Try again?
You mean the city where they think it's way better than anywhere else? Where some NYers brag about not leaving Manhattan/the city for years? That NYC?

Do you have any idea what you're talking about?

You're calling out Californian's for liking their state, but it's ok for Nyers and Texans to do the same thing. Hypocrite much?
     
     
  #71  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 1:30 AM
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Originally Posted by austlar1 View Post
At a macro level, DFW already is quite the disaster, but fortunately for most residents, they don't live in the DFW area at the macro level. The same could be said for LA area residents, although I think probably a greater percentage of LA residents commute longer distances to and from work or school than do their Metroplex (I really hate that name) counterparts. Both metros have several nodes of employment and business activity, but in the DFW area, with it's much lower housing prices and greater housing mobility, people tend to live a bit closer to where they work. DFW can add several million more residents without too much disruption.
What does the first sentence even mean? Looking at DFW from satellite view, it appears that a disproportionate amount of the growth is happening in the northeast quadrant (Frisco, McKinney) of the metro area. That assumption is supported by the numbers, which also show significant population gains in Tarrant County (Fort Worth). So, the macro-level snapshot of DFW is certainly relevant. Adding "several million more residents" would likely entail expanding that macro-level view.

I don't know whether or not it's true that more people in LA commute long-distance, but I'm firmly of the belief that most people don't choose to live where they live because of proximity to employment. People change jobs all the time, and most aren't going to uproot their children for a shorter commute to a job that might only last a few years. Further, people who move to DFW are likely interested in large, new-construction homes... which, again, are likely to be found in peripheral areas.
     
     
  #72  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 1:38 AM
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To those saying Houston/ Dallas can't grow that much more than they are, the US population is still growing at a steady pace and especially in already fast growing areas so why wouldn't they hit 10+ million in 30 or years? Same for LA at 20 or so million.

Last edited by JManc; Oct 20, 2019 at 2:47 AM. Reason: Grammar
     
     
  #73  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 1:47 AM
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Never said they can't hit 10 plus million in 30 years. That's very likely.

I said its impossible for them to gain 12 million extra residents in the next 30 years.
     
     
  #74  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 2:00 AM
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LA would have to shrink. Barring unspeakable calamities, LA is too much of a star for Houston or DFW to come close to catching.
     
     
  #75  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 2:31 AM
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Raise your hand if you live where you live mainly because it offers a convenient commute to your (current) job.

Quote:
Long commute: Why so many people choose to live in Fort Worth but work in Dallas

By Gordon Dickson
October 3, 2019

FORT WORTH

Grant Senter has a terrific job with a startup health care firm in Dallas, and yet he chooses to live in Fort Worth.

Each day, he spends three hours commuting, making the 43-mile trip to and from his home near Eagle Mountain Lake.

“We lived in Dallas for a year, and hated it. I like to say Dallas is like LA without the beach,” said Senter, 27, who has lived in Fort Worth for four years. “We love Fort Worth. My wife has a family business in Fort Worth, and we like the people and the food.”

...

Several commuters interviewed by the Fort Worth Star-Telegram affirmed that they prefer to live in Tarrant County because of its residential amenities.

Shortly after Prem Babbili moved from Kansas to North Texas in 1991, he moved to the Hurst-Euless-Bedford area. He bought a home in Hurst in 2003 — even though his new job was more than 20 miles away in Dallas.

“My wife and I chose the Mid-Cities area because they had a good school system, in the H-E-B school district,” said Babbili, who today still commutes to Dallas, where he now works as a financial analyst at UT Southwestern Medical Center. “We felt Dallas was too congested. In the Mid-Cities, we are in proximity of everything — shopping malls, theaters, and I have friends who live in the area.”

For years, Babbili made the hour-long drive from Northeast Tarrant County to Dallas, where he worked as a financial analyst for another employer. Even though the drive was grueling, he said it was worth it because he loved his Tarrant County neighborhood.

...

Another commuter, Michael Buster, lives in the Ridglea Hills neighborhood of west Fort Worth, and works about an hour and 15 minutes to the east as a commercial real estate underwriter. His office is near Central Expressway and Lover’s Lane in Dallas.

Buster had worked in Southlake, when his brother mentioned that a firm in Dallas was hiring for accounting positions. Buster took the new job, and for a few months drove back and forth to Dallas before he and his wife decided to move east.

But their relocation didn’t last long.

“I could walk to work, but, long-term, me and my wife weren’t really Dallas people,” Buster said. “We decided to move back to Fort Worth.”

...

Read more here: https://www.star-telegram.com/news/b...#storylink=cpy
     
     
  #76  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 2:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
To those saying Houston/ Dallas can't grow that much more than they are, the US population is still growing a steady pace and especially in already so growing areas so why wouldn't they hit 10+ million in 30 or years? Same for LA at 20 or so million.
Wow, some sanity provided here.

In Other Words: Where are those additional 70 million people going to settle? Empty lands, or crowded NIMBY districts?
     
     
  #77  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 3:46 AM
austlar1 austlar1 is online now
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Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
What does the first sentence even mean? Looking at DFW from satellite view, it appears that a disproportionate amount of the growth is happening in the northeast quadrant (Frisco, McKinney) of the metro area. That assumption is supported by the numbers, which also show significant population gains in Tarrant County (Fort Worth). So, the macro-level snapshot of DFW is certainly relevant. Adding "several million more residents" would likely entail expanding that macro-level view.

I don't know whether or not it's true that more people in LA commute long-distance, but I'm firmly of the belief that most people don't choose to live where they live because of proximity to employment. People change jobs all the time, and most aren't going to uproot their children for a shorter commute to a job that might only last a few years. Further, people who move to DFW are likely interested in large, new-construction homes... which, again, are likely to be found in peripheral areas.
Get on the ground in DFW and you'll find that there are major employment nodes throughout the region. Those various employment centers taken separately constitute a micro view of the region's economy. There are thousands of jobs in central Fort Worth and on the west side or Fort Worth, NE Tarrant County/southern Denton County around development associated with Alliance Airport, over at DFW Airport itself (at least 50,000 jobs there at the airport alone), Irving/Las Colinas to the east of DFW Airport, Mid-cities area around Arlington especially, North Dallas along both the Stemmons and North Central Freeway corridors, downtown Dallas proper and midtown, and the Richardson, Plano, Frisco Telecom corridor. DFW workers spend on average around 25 minutes each way commuting on freeways that are crowded but not as crowded as in many other metros.

My point about there being more housing mobility in DFW relates to the fact that housing is cheaper and relatively plentiful throughout the region. I don't have raw numbers, but anecdotally I can tell you about several different people I have known who moved from one part of the DFW area to another in order to be closer to employment. It happens all the time, and, more important, it is fairly easy to accomplish. That certainly is not the case for the more expensive metro regions in California and elsewhere, and it is part of what gives DFW (and Houston or Atlanta perhaps) a leg up in attracting new residents and businesses to the area. By the way, I don't think commenting in this fashion consitutes some kind of homerism or boosterism about life in Texas. It is just one explanation that may partially explain the explosive growth of the region.

Last edited by austlar1; Oct 20, 2019 at 7:04 PM.
     
     
  #78  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 4:04 AM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
I wasn't thinking about transit, more the amount of freeway miles and surface streets (that actually moves traffic) where LA wipes the floor with both of them. LA's bus service is massive, as well as many of the suburbs offering their own busy systems.

What's the percentage of people using transit in LA, Houston or Dallas? It's not high, so where these cities are with transit is kinda moot.
What percentage of people use transit in Dallas today? A very low amount.

But pointing out Dallas's large transit system wasn't to show how many people are using it currently, it was to show how many people it could absorb into the system.
     
     
  #79  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 4:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
Raise your hand if you live where you live mainly because it offers a convenient commute to your (current) job.


Good find, but the article is clearly about outliers. As a Fort Worth native (and current Austin resident), I can understand why that one gentleman might prefer to live in FW and commute to downtown Dallas. Ridglea Hills is a gorgeous neighborhood. He can travel back and forth to Dallas nowadays via the Trinity River Express commuter rail, if he so chooses. Fort Worth seems to create a certain loyalty among long time residents, and it is true that some of them do commute to Dallas for work. I have known many, however, who eventually moved to Big D and also others who moved from Dallas to FW.

The other guy mentioned in the article, living in HEB area. probably has/had (the article used the past tense to describe his living arrangements) a commute of about 20 miles. HEB communities, just west of DFW, are considered almost "mid cities", somewhat equal distance from central FW or destinations in north central Dallas or even downtown Dallas. HEB residents commute to FW, Alliance and DFW, Irving, and elsewhere in north Dallas or downtown Dallas. It is really a very convenient location.

One other take-away from the article you cited would be that all these folks had a real choice in determining where they wanted to live. They seemed to staying put because they liked their current homes and were willing to put up with some inconvenience to remain there. They were not stuck in these homes because of affordability issues or lack of other housing options.

As for the guy commuting from Eagle Mountain Lake to central Dallas, he is just plain crazy!

Last edited by austlar1; Oct 21, 2019 at 3:32 AM.
     
     
  #80  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 4:18 AM
JAYNYC JAYNYC is offline
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
You mean the city where they think it's way better than anywhere else? Where some NYers brag about not leaving Manhattan/the city for years? That NYC?

Do you have any idea what you're talking about?

You're calling out Californian's for liking their state, but it's ok for Nyers and Texans to do the same thing. Hypocrite much?
Allow me to make this as simple as possible for you since you appear to struggle with basic communication concepts (e.g., positive phrasing).

"I love/have a great deal of pride in California/Texas/New York/any other state."

- reasonable comment from a person who enjoys and/or takes pride in a particular state

"What's the draw in Texas besides col? Not much."

- pompous, bone-headed comment from an obnoxious, uninformed, elitist tool

I fully expect you'll have a nonsensical, moronic douchebag response in support of your perspective (you know, since you're a "must get the last word-type"), but I won't waste one more minute attempting to enlighten you.
     
     
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