HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

About The Ads  This week the ad company used in the forum will be monitoring activity and doing some tests to identify any problems which users may be experiencing. If at any time this week you get pop-ups, redirects, etc. as a result of ads please let us know by sending an email to forum@skyscraperpage.com or post in the ads complaint thread. Thank you for your participation.


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #21  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 12:04 AM
SFBruin SFBruin is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 284
That Canadian map is actually how I see Canada lol. My bad.
__________________
I don't read. I apologize in advance.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #22  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 12:23 AM
SpawnOfVulcan's Avatar
SpawnOfVulcan SpawnOfVulcan is offline
Cat Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: America's Magic City
Posts: 3,593
Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
The original map is pretty stupid. Greater Appalachia goes into New Mexico, and also seemingly includes Dallas? Why is there one county in northern Iowa that is Yankeedom and is surrounded on three sides by the Midlands? What makes that county so much different? The NYC metro is so distinctive that it is separate from the rest of Yankeedom and New Jersey, but parts of the Dakotas, parts of Colorado, and parts of New Mexico are more similar to parts of New Jersey than NYC?
I think all of the maps are pretty ridiculous.

I'm sure most that are familiary with me know that I scrutinize how outsiders classify Alabama. Alabama's Big 4 (Tuscaloosa is making a run to be the 5th "Big") are all extraordinarily different culturally, economically, and ecologically.

Painting with such a broad brush placing many different regions is horribly shortsighted and ignorant. I'm going on a 5th year living in Birmingham, and while I'm more than comfortable in larger cities, such a dense and urban environment still feels a bit foreign to me. Growing up in North Alabama, I was (maybe still am) used to a lot of flat terrain, a highly educated workforce, great school systems, and very frequent, violent weather. None of those things really fit in something called the "Upper South", "Greater Appalachia", or the "Deep South".

Many of these cultural designations are simply phantasmal and do a diservice by categorizing citizens that live in these reigons into groups that are wholly inaccurate representations of their cultural identity.

Hope that made since... I'm on my 3rd glass of wine.
__________________
SSP Alabama Metros: Birmingham (City Compilation) - Huntsville - Mobile - Montgomery - Tuscaloosa - Daphne-Fairhope - Decatur

SSP Alabama Universities: Alabama - UAB - Alabama State
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #23  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 12:31 AM
The Chemist's Avatar
The Chemist The Chemist is offline
恭喜发财!
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: 中国上海/Shanghai
Posts: 8,660
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFBruin View Post
That Canadian map is actually how I see Canada lol. My bad.
As a Canadian I think it's totally out to lunch.
__________________
"Nothing is too wonderful to be true, if it be consistent with the laws of nature." - Michael Faraday (1791-1867)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #24  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 12:31 AM
edale edale is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 500
.......how many times is this dumb map going to be discussed on SSP?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #25  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 12:33 AM
dc_denizen's Avatar
dc_denizen dc_denizen is offline
Selfie-stick vendor
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: New York Suburbs
Posts: 6,583
this has been discussed at least 9 times.
__________________
Joined the bus on the 33rd seat
By the doo-doo room with the reek replete
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #26  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 1:57 AM
xzmattzx's Avatar
xzmattzx xzmattzx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 5,191
The original map is pretty stupid. Greater Appalachia goes into New Mexico, and also seemingly includes Dallas? Why is there one county in northern Iowa that is Yankeedom and is surrounded on three sides by the Midlands? What makes that county so much different? The NYC metro is so distinctive that North Jersey is a different region than South Jersey, but parts of the Dakotas, parts of Colorado, and parts of New Mexico are more similar to parts of South Jersey than NYC?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #27  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 2:11 AM
Obadno Obadno is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
The original map is pretty stupid. Greater Appalachia goes into New Mexico, and also seemingly includes Dallas? Why is there one county in northern Iowa that is Yankeedom and is surrounded on three sides by the Midlands? What makes that county so much different? The NYC metro is so distinctive that North Jersey is a different region than South Jersey, but parts of the Dakotas, parts of Colorado, and parts of New Mexico are more similar to parts of South Jersey than NYC?
Not to mention Quebec and the Louisiana Bayou being the same cultural nation and NYC still identifying as New Amsterdam despite that cultural heritage being gone for a solid 300 years.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #28  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 3:09 PM
Handro Handro is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Chicago
Posts: 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
well of course i would agree with you,

but according to the retarded map you posted, they are.

they're all in "the midlands" region, which is just plain old absurd.
Yikes. Check your glasses. Philadelphia is grouped with New York in the "New Netherlands" region.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
Not to mention Quebec and the Louisiana Bayou being the same cultural nation and NYC still identifying as New Amsterdam despite that cultural heritage being gone for a solid 300 years.
Lol, I think you're taking it a little too literally.

New Netherlands: "Dutch founded, a global trading culture; materialistic; multicultural; committed to tolerance and freedom of inquiry and conscience"
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #29  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 3:16 PM
Steely Dan's Avatar
Steely Dan Steely Dan is online now
devout Pizzatarian
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Lincoln Square, Chicago
Posts: 21,373
Quote:
Originally Posted by Handro View Post
Yikes. Check your glasses. Philadelphia is grouped with New York in the "New Netherlands" region.
You check your glasses. Philadelphia is clearly in "the midlands" region, along with places like omaha and thunder bay, among others.

and that fact is one of the many reasons why that map is absurdly stupid.
__________________
He has to go.

Last edited by Steely Dan; Sep 27, 2019 at 3:39 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #30  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 3:35 PM
mousquet's Avatar
mousquet mousquet is offline
that prick
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Nimbyland Paris, Museum France
Posts: 3,441
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpawnOfVulcan View Post
Hope that made since... I'm on my 3rd glass of wine.
Oh!? You drink wine instead of beer or stronger drinks?
You're a right kind of fellow, my type of guy. Lol.

"New France" has been far too small since the 7 years war in my opinion... I actually doubt Louisiana or Alabama has anything left related to contemporary France, even though we'd be welcome over there as exotic ancestors actually deserving of respect, but it's been the same all over the US for us Frenchies.
Even Texas is in fact welcoming to us. I never saw anybody in the US to really hate us. Some just pretend to do so for fun, pretty much like in England. But it's nothing serious.

Only Quebec is so-called New France, cause it's about languages, people.
Languages are a hellish thing to keep us all divided.
__________________
psst... A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. (John 13:34)
Notre maison brûle... Et nous regardons ailleurs ! - Jacques Chirac on environmental issues in 2002.
I like bass. Give me some.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #31  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 3:46 PM
BG918's Avatar
BG918 BG918 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 3,084


Maps like this that break down the regions are better and make more sense. Some edits I would make based on what I know about these states:

Colorado
Move the Southwest region higher up along the Front Range to just south of Colorado Springs including the cities of Trinidad and Pueblo and the San Luis Valley. That portion of Colorado is culturally different than the "Northern Front Range" which includes Colorado Springs and the Denver/Boulder metro. I would keep that mixed with Mountain Frontier but the drop-off to Upper Midwest is just outside Denver. Some would even say that Denver is the largest Midwestern city outside of the Midwest because of its similar built form and all of the Rust Belt transplants.

Honestly there should be another region within Upper Midwest to distinguish the high plains of Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming and the Dakotas from the farmland of Iowa, southern Minnesota and the Red River Valley including eastern North and South Dakota. There should be another subregion for Northern Minnesota which is unlike anything else in the U.S. with its forests and lakes, and the Boundary Waters.

Oklahoma
Pretty accurate showing how Oklahoma City and Tulsa have more in common with Kansas City and Omaha but a good portion of the state aligns more with the culture of the South. And then there is the Ozark topography and culture which is completely different than the rest of the state. Tulsa is on the edge of this subregion and as a result is a very different city than OKC even though they are only 90 miles apart.

Texas
Shows how Texas functions as its own subregion, which is a blend of the South and Southwest. I would move the Texas region further west to encompass the Permian Basis oil drilling area around Midland. The only true "non-Texas" Southwest area is around El Paso down to Big Bend National Park. I would also extend the High Plains region I mentioned for Colorado down to include the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles. That subregion would go from Lubbock TX all the way up to South Dakota.

You could make a case for a couple of sub-regions within "Texas": north coastal from Corpus Christi up to Beaumont; piney woods in the eastern part; north texas around DFW; Austin and the Hill Country; San Antonio and points south; and the borderlands in the Rio Grande Valley (only predominantly Spanish-speaking area within the continental U.S.)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #32  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 10:57 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Colebrook, NH (as well as QC & FL)
Posts: 25,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Handro View Post
Omaha and Philadelphia are not part of the same region.
Amarillo and Ottawa, then?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #33  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 11:15 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by BG918 View Post


Maps like this that break down the regions are better and make more sense. Some edits I would make based on what I know about these states:

Colorado
Move the Southwest region higher up along the Front Range to just south of Colorado Springs including the cities of Trinidad and Pueblo and the San Luis Valley. That portion of Colorado is culturally different than the "Northern Front Range" which includes Colorado Springs and the Denver/Boulder metro. I would keep that mixed with Mountain Frontier but the drop-off to Upper Midwest is just outside Denver. Some would even say that Denver is the largest Midwestern city outside of the Midwest because of its similar built form and all of the Rust Belt transplants.

Honestly there should be another region within Upper Midwest to distinguish the high plains of Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming and the Dakotas from the farmland of Iowa, southern Minnesota and the Red River Valley including eastern North and South Dakota. There should be another subregion for Northern Minnesota which is unlike anything else in the U.S. with its forests and lakes, and the Boundary Waters.

Oklahoma
Pretty accurate showing how Oklahoma City and Tulsa have more in common with Kansas City and Omaha but a good portion of the state aligns more with the culture of the South. And then there is the Ozark topography and culture which is completely different than the rest of the state. Tulsa is on the edge of this subregion and as a result is a very different city than OKC even though they are only 90 miles apart.

Texas
Shows how Texas functions as its own subregion, which is a blend of the South and Southwest. I would move the Texas region further west to encompass the Permian Basis oil drilling area around Midland. The only true "non-Texas" Southwest area is around El Paso down to Big Bend National Park. I would also extend the High Plains region I mentioned for Colorado down to include the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles. That subregion would go from Lubbock TX all the way up to South Dakota.

You could make a case for a couple of sub-regions within "Texas": north coastal from Corpus Christi up to Beaumont; piney woods in the eastern part; north texas around DFW; Austin and the Hill Country; San Antonio and points south; and the borderlands in the Rio Grande Valley (only predominantly Spanish-speaking area within the continental U.S.)
Generally agree obviously there are ways to nitpick especially when it comes to your points on Colorado and Texas, I would also probably make the Bay area its own cultural island but I generally find this to be the best map Ive come across with reasonable and not overstated cultural regional differences.

I mean the fact that all the Yellowish regions encompass "the west" splitting the Southwest and Mountain frontier into sub regions and the Pacific coast into sub regions. All of these places are still more alike eachother than they are like New England or The Deep south. Etc.

Whoever made it just did a very good job.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #34  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2019, 11:39 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Colebrook, NH (as well as QC & FL)
Posts: 25,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by edale View Post
.......how many times is this dumb map going to be discussed on SSP?
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_denizen View Post
this has been discussed at least 9 times.
I'm pretty sure I recall that I suggested already a modification of the forum software so that from now on, any attempt to post a new thread about that map gets the user instantly banned and the thread removed.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2019, 1:55 AM
JManc's Avatar
JManc JManc is online now
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 25,441
That map shows Austin as an island in Texas. It really isn't. It's the most progressive major area in Texas but still very Texas. Texas is so big and diverse (not all rootin' tootin' conservatives) that there's a little bit of Austin in all the major cities.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #36  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2019, 4:34 AM
BG918's Avatar
BG918 BG918 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 3,084
Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
That map shows Austin as an island in Texas. It really isn't. It's the most progressive major area in Texas but still very Texas. Texas is so big and diverse (not all rootin' tootin' conservatives) that there's a little bit of Austin in all the major cities.
As I mentioned there are distinct subregions within “Texas”. Houston and the coastal areas have a very different feel than Dallas/Fort Worth. As does Austin and San Antonio. Tyler is about as different from Amarillo as Midland is from Brownsville. Yet all are still part of the Texas culture which is unique amongst the U.S. states.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #37  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2019, 12:29 PM
Sun Belt's Avatar
Sun Belt Sun Belt is offline
Love it or leave it : )
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: The Envy of the World
Posts: 4,768
Quote:
Originally Posted by Handro View Post

San Bernardino is The Far West, while Riverside is El Norte.

Also no mention of actual Nations, like Navajo/Hopi Indian lands, they're just lumped in there with Salt Lake City, Las Vegas, Spokane and Denver.

Nearly identical if you ask me!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #38  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2019, 2:25 PM
The North One's Avatar
The North One The North One is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 3,930
Dear lord, we already had a post about this exact map and concluded it was nonsense.
__________________
Spawn of questionable parentage!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #39  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2019, 4:53 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Colebrook, NH (as well as QC & FL)
Posts: 25,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
San Bernardino is The Far West, while Riverside is El Norte.
When driving on I-10 from Houston to Pensacola I actually thought I had gotten lost, for a moment I was sure I was instead driving from Ontario to New Brunswick and the maps and GPS were all lying to me, as I suddenly found myself home to my great puzzlement.


(Sarcasm, just in case there's any doubt.)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #40  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2019, 4:55 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Colebrook, NH (as well as QC & FL)
Posts: 25,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by The North One View Post
Dear lord, we already had a post about this exact map and concluded it was nonsense.
We had this exact thread at least five times already, and concluded every time that it's absolute nonsense.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 8:32 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.