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  #221  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2015, 7:43 AM
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sirkingwilliam sirkingwilliam is online now
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Quote:
Much has been written about the supposed preference of millennials to live in hip urban settings where cars are not necessary. Surveys of best cities for millennials invariably features places like New York, San Francisco, Chicago and Boston, cities that often are also favorites of the authors.

Yet there has been precious little support for such assertions. I asked demographer Wendell Cox to do a precise, up-to-date analysis of where this huge generation born between 1983 and 2003 actually resides. Using Census American Community Survey data, Cox has drawn an intriguing picture of millennial America, one that is often at odds with the conventional wisdom of many of their elders.

Equally surprising are those cities that have seen the largest increases in their millennial population. It is dogma among greens, urban pundits, planners and developers that the under 30 crowd doesn’t like what Grist called “sprawling car dependent cities.” Too bad no one told most millennials. For the most part, looking at America’s largest metro areas (the 52 metropolitan statistical areas with populations over a million) the fastest growth in millennial populations tend to be in the Sun Belt and Intermountain West. Leading the way is, San Antonio, Texas, where the 20 to 29 population grew 9.2% from 2010-13, an increase of 28,600.

Right behind it, also in the Sun Belt, are Riverside-San Bernardino, Calif. (8.3%); Orlando, Fla. (8.1%); and Miami (7.7%).
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  #222  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2015, 3:27 PM
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Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post
Pretty sure she never said any of that.
True, not those words. But Uber and Lyft were not even on her campaign when running for mayor. She wasn't going to even try to get them back, and now she is actively trying to get them back? I don't understand her at all.

And that's so awesome we had the largest millennial gain. Very exciting times.
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  #223  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2015, 6:47 PM
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JACKinBeantown JACKinBeantown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post


Much has been written about the supposed preference of millennials to live in hip urban settings where cars are not necessary. Surveys of best cities for millennials invariably features places like New York, San Francisco, Chicago and Boston, cities that often are also favorites of the authors.

Yet there has been precious little support for such assertions. I asked demographer Wendell Cox to do a precise, up-to-date analysis of where this huge generation born between 1983 and 2003 actually resides. Using Census American Community Survey data, Cox has drawn an intriguing picture of millennial America, one that is often at odds with the conventional wisdom of many of their elders.

Equally surprising are those cities that have seen the largest increases in their millennial population. It is dogma among greens, urban pundits, planners and developers that the under 30 crowd doesn’t like what Grist called “sprawling car dependent cities.” Too bad no one told most millennials. For the most part, looking at America’s largest metro areas (the 52 metropolitan statistical areas with populations over a million) the fastest growth in millennial populations tend to be in the Sun Belt and Intermountain West. Leading the way is, San Antonio, Texas, where the 20 to 29 population grew 9.2% from 2010-13, an increase of 28,600.

Right behind it, also in the Sun Belt, are Riverside-San Bernardino, Calif. (8.3%); Orlando, Fla. (8.1%); and Miami (7.7%).
That's great for San Antonio, and I really mean that. But using percentage of population increase doesn't really tell the story correctly. Marfa could have 50% growth in the 20-29 demographic but only gain a dozen or so people. And metro growth numbers are more valid because (for example) Boston's population is only 14% of its metro population whereas San Antonio's is 63% of its metro.
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  #224  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2015, 1:02 AM
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Originally Posted by JACKinBeantown View Post
That's great for San Antonio, and I really mean that. But using percentage of population increase doesn't really tell the story correctly. Marfa could have 50% growth in the 20-29 demographic but only gain a dozen or so people. And metro growth numbers are more valid because (for example) Boston's population is only 14% of its metro population whereas San Antonio's is 63% of its metro.
Upon reading it again I stand corrected (by myself). The statistic apparently did use the MSA.

I'll leave my original mistake up in plain view for all the see because I'm not ashamed of making a mistake.
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  #225  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2015, 3:46 PM
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San Antonio is set to deliver as much new industrial space as Dallas and more than Houston, Austin, or El Paso in 2015.

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Of Texas' 1.4 billion-square-foot market, San Antonio is set to deliver nearly 700,000 square feet more with some of the developments underway. That's roughly the same amount of new product that Dallas has in the pipeline, but a healthy distance ahead of what Houston, Austin, McAllen and El Paso have in theirs. To put that in perspective, Austin has just a bit shy of 500,000 square feet of industrial space under construction, and El Paso has about 150,000 square feet that will soon hit the market.
http://www.bizjournals.com/sanantoni...s-up-with.html
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  #226  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2015, 4:08 AM
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CPS Energy’s CEO to resign

Just an update to these earlier postings:

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Originally Posted by kornbread View Post
Yes, that's what the article said they would do; vote on it the following day. The board was very interested in retaining him. What wasn't known is if it would be unanimous given the current mayor's bid to win re-election. Would she make some sort of stand given that she threw rail under the bus? (Which is now left to the voter's to decide, essentially limiting it from happening.) She did not.

If I'm not mistaken, there might still be some public forum needed and Beneby would need to officially accept the offer. I had not heard that he had done that.

http://www.therivardreport.com/cps-e...y-a-big-raise/
CPS Energy Board Gives Beneby a Big Raise
and now the update...

http://www.mysanantonio.com/business...gn-6438934.php
By Vicki Vaughan Updated 9:49 pm, Tuesday, August 11, 2015
Quote:
Doyle Beneby, who steered CPS Energy through a tumultuous time since he joined the utility five years ago, will resign effective Sept. 30, he said Tuesday.
Beneby said he has accepted another offer, but he declined to say for the present what his new post will be.
Will he be involved in a big decision to move their headquarters before he resigns? He was championing a new tower, would his replacement carry that much weight as an incoming CEO?
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  #227  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2015, 1:28 PM
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Originally Posted by kornbread View Post
Just an update to these earlier postings:



and now the update...

http://www.mysanantonio.com/business...gn-6438934.php
By Vicki Vaughan Updated 9:49 pm, Tuesday, August 11, 2015


Will he be involved in a big decision to move their headquarters before he resigns? He was championing a new tower, would his replacement carry that much weight as an incoming CEO?
Hopefully, but I wouldn't hold my breath. I hope I am wrong, but it doesn't sound too good when the one person who was championing a project leaves for another job and we haven't heard any new details in a while about the headquarters. Maybe we will hear something soon. You would think most of the competitors would have designed or be working on it right now, but, like I said, we haven't hard anything new yet so I'm not sure about the fate of the project.
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  #228  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2015, 7:46 PM
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The CPS HQ project is moving forward.

CPS will choose from three sites and the decision will be made at the end of the year.
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  #229  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2015, 9:07 PM
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Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post
The CPS HQ project is moving forward.

CPS will choose from three sites and the decision will be made at the end of the year.
Well that's good news, hopefully the new CEO will decide on something soon.
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  #230  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2015, 9:55 PM
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From the Business Journal article:
Quote:
Beneby told the San Antonio Business Journal that CPS Energy will make the choice for a new headquarters building from three possible sites but a final decision is not expected until the end of the year.
CPS Energy is looking to either renovate its current headquarters along the River Walk or to find or build a new location in the "urban core" of San Antonio. Beneby said the goal is to spur economic development in the downtown area and that the search for such a site will continue without him.
By the time they choose a new CEO, the end of the year is probably soon enough.

A little of the same from a different source:
http://www.therivardreport.com/cps-e...eby-resigning/
IRIS DIMMICK on 12 August, 2015 at 13:09
Quote:
CPS Energy will continue with plans to either build a new downtown headquarters, buy an existing property to relocate or renovate its current buildings. Commercial real estate sources say Beneby seemed to be leaning toward a newly constructed headquarters rather than purchasing the former AT&T towers on McCullough Avenue or renovating its existing buildings on Navarro Street.

The speculation about a new headquarters for CPS Energy has been the subject of speculation now for more than two years. Beneby’s planned departure will probably lead to further delays in any decision.
Not surprised the old att campus was mentioned, it's a good location.
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  #231  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2015, 9:47 PM
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Live Nation coming to Aztec



This is great news for the San Antonio music scene and a huge missed opportunity for iheartradio. Someone needs to get them on program.



http://www.bizjournals.com/sanantoni...n-antonio.html
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  #232  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2015, 12:19 AM
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We may be witnessing the changing of the guard in Central Texas (a bit earlier than we expected).

A first, Austin beats San Antonio's hotel business

*One positive note...Both San Antonio and Austin have half (or almost half) the "hotel" business as Dallas/Ft. Worth and Houston - two metros with at or almost three times the number of people in their metro areas.
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  #233  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2015, 4:29 PM
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Austin Convention Center expansion seen as 'threat' to San Antonio
W. Scott Baily
Austin Business Journal
Aug 26, 2015, 9:21am CDT

http://www.bizjournals.com/austin/ne...as-threat.html

Quote:
If Austin carries through with plans to significantly expand its convention center, San Antonio could find itself in a more intense battle for tourism and hospitality business with a well-armed competitor 70 miles away.
I've never been sold on the location of this Hemisfair civic park, even though I live close to it. I still believe that the existing structures would be better served as part an even larger convention center or entertainment structure. Maybe if this convention center was the lone wolf in the region it might suit us fine, but in light of this news, shouldn't we reconsider demolishing the older part of the convention center? Once that park is there, there will be no additional room for expansion. I'm not well informed as to whether or not the powers that be took this potential competition with Austin into consideration, but this news certainly has me hoping that it will give pause to this part of the redevelopment.
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  #234  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2015, 5:18 PM
whatdoyouwantandwhy whatdoyouwantandwhy is offline
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I'm chalking this comment up to an hasty analysis of the situation and the false perception that Austin's success is somehow a problem for San Antonio. The fact is Austin is enjoying this growth because people want to move/visit the city. Instead of whining over Austin's success and shooting ourselves in the foot, we need to improve our urban core and define/redefine what makes San Antonio great.

This goes back to what I said in the off-topic thread; the 20th century was harsh for progress in SA and we have to dig ourselves out of a huge hole, but that doesn't mean we can't become great. Lastly, the idea of reconnecting Lavaca with downtown via the hemisfair park redevelopment is vastly dependent on the civic park portion of the park. I have to disagree whole heartily on your statement that we should discontinue progress because of what Austin is doing.
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  #235  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2015, 6:21 PM
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From what I remember is that they wanted to incorporate the Alamodome for space as well. Am I mistaken on this?
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  #236  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2015, 6:37 PM
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Speaking of the convention center maybe this idea would not be bad?

http://www.ksat.com/news/will-sa-con...eau-go-private

Quote:
A 13-member task force appointed by Mayor Ivy Taylor is considering whether the San Antonio Convention and Visitors Bureau (SACVB) should split from the city.

Of the top 30 tourism markets, San Antonio is the only city with a government-operated convention and visitors bureau.
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  #237  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2015, 6:56 PM
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I'm not sure this is necessarily a bad thing for San Antonio. On the face of it it does seem so, but you have to remember that Austin and San Antonio both offer something very different when it comes to entertainment. San Antonio does things in a more intimate way that draws a lot of people to witness something historic and grand, while Austin does big festivals. I don't think that San Antonio's wonder is being one-upped, I just think that Austin is getting the kind of attractions that draw more people simply because that's the nature of them - that they draw a lot of people even in a short time. That's just what festivals do.

Besides, San Antonio still has WAY more hotels than Austin does. Something like 40 or 50 more, and you guys still have a much bigger convention center than we do. Not only that, but our's is kind of pinned in by surrounding development that is substantial enough that it won't be demolished for an expansion. One area I would eye an expansion for San Antonio's convention center is west of Alamo Street between the riverwalk, and between Cesar Chavez and Nueva Street. That would still be close enough to the existing convention center that it wouldn't be too inconvenient, plus La Villita and all the Fiesta celebrations. A new (big) convention hotel could even be implemented into the expansion.
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  #238  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2015, 8:00 PM
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Another location for expansion is directly north of int. On that lot between Commerce and Market. Right now I think it's a parking lot. They could easily build a skybridge over Market and make it a few stories tall.
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  #239  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2015, 11:56 PM
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They could always build up....
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  #240  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2015, 2:51 AM
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Originally Posted by whatdoyouwantandwhy View Post
I'm chalking this comment up to an hasty analysis of the situation and the false perception that Austin's success is somehow a problem for San Antonio..
When I first visited Texas in 1980, my two priority destinations were San Antonio and Austin. I didn't regard one as a competitor or alternative to the other, they were a package deal in my mind because they're so distinct from one another and my reasons for visiting were completely unique and independent for each city.

I had heard about the beauty of the River Walk and downtown SA, and it had a reputation for authenticity and tourism combined, something that is rare in American cities. I had heard about Austin only from someone in Vermont who said that Austin was very progressive, hip, and had a great music scene.

I arrive in each city with virtually no expectations. SA blew me away. I remember thinking that the Riverwalk was the most beautiful urban place I had ever seen in the USA. Granted, the touristy aspect isn't appealing but the physical space itself, with the landscaping and architecture and overall vibe, is just wonderful. I loved the narrow downtown streets with the old buildings as well. I told friends that San Antonio was the most non-American city in America, and I meant it as a compliment --- you can travel abroad without leaving the US, that's what I meant.

Austin was a delightful surprise in a very different way. I didn't think it was very attractive but I loved the funkiness, the culture, the liberalism, the hippie scene. I was a leftist hippie myself, and I felt very much at home here. There was also a personality about Austin that was hard to explain to anyone, but I fell in love and told myself that I would live here someday. I didn't expect to spend 25 years here, but that's how long I've been an Austinite.

To me, Austin-San Antonio is a package deal and there should be cooperation as well as competition. A healthy dose of each is ideal. Too much cooperation without the competitive edge leads to mediocrity. Too much competition without cooperative efforts to solve mutual problems (transportation!!) results in wasted efforts and lose-lose outcomes.

We have a lot of problems in common and we probably wouldn't all agree on what those are. For me, the main shared problems are traffic/transportation, water supply, quality of life (preserving natural beauty rather than paving everything in sight), and slowing the pace of corporate exploitation of our regional success. On that last item, every city in the region is failing miserably. We're seeing rampant sprawl as profiteering developers vomit the cheapest, fastest forms of awful suburban crap all over the landscape, and the legacy of this uncontrolled cancer will leave the Austin-SA corridor in terrible condition, with every problem listed being greatly exacerbated over time. I already have an exit strategy with my sights set on one of the interior Northwest towns --- Bend, Boise, Missoula, or Pullman/Moscow.
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