HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #41  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2012, 4:24 AM
NYC NYC is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by trueviking View Post
yeah but are there any photos of minneapolis?
I posted a ton on the first page.

Last edited by LMich; Dec 24, 2012 at 8:46 AM. Reason: Photo removed for improper source citation - come on, guys.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #42  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2012, 8:58 AM
kemachs kemachs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Boomtown
Posts: 106
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC View Post
I posted a ton on the first page.
Haha, I think they are well aware..

The thread is a good 75% Minneapolis photos
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #43  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2012, 4:27 PM
animatedmartian's Avatar
animatedmartian animatedmartian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,758
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #44  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2012, 5:48 PM
Rico Rommheim's Avatar
Rico Rommheim Rico Rommheim is offline
Look at me!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: City of Bagels
Posts: 12,213
^Fan-tastic picture of Detroit. Funny how that big train station building was placed way out there. What was that neighbourhood like, light residential?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #45  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2012, 5:49 PM
Rico Rommheim's Avatar
Rico Rommheim Rico Rommheim is offline
Look at me!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: City of Bagels
Posts: 12,213
Bethlehem, 1898


wikipedia
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #46  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2012, 12:37 AM
animatedmartian's Avatar
animatedmartian animatedmartian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico Rommheim View Post
^Fan-tastic picture of Detroit. Funny how that big train station building was placed way out there. What was that neighbourhood like, light residential?
That's not the train station. That's the former General Motor's HQ. There's mainly a lot of large mansions and there were mostly low-rise apartment buildings and townhomes. There's also some industrial buildings along the rail line.

The apartments pictured here were replaced with the New Center Building.


http://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/dpa1ic/x...82/dpa5182.tif


http://dlxs.lib.wayne.edu/cgi/i/imag...-74294%5D74294


http://dlxs.lib.wayne.edu/cgi/i/imag...-34223%5D34223



http://dlxs.lib.wayne.edu/cgi/i/imag...ND-1%5D34223_1

^Also note the Lodge Freeway is being built in this last picture.

Last edited by animatedmartian; Dec 26, 2012 at 12:50 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #47  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2012, 8:03 AM
aro1419's Avatar
aro1419 aro1419 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Philadelphia, Pa
Posts: 317
An aerial photograph of Philadelphia from 1935 that has been posted a few times on this forum:


Last edited by aro1419; Jun 11, 2013 at 2:53 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #48  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2012, 8:18 AM
Mojeda101's Avatar
Mojeda101 Mojeda101 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: DTLA
Posts: 1,403
WHOA!! ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

That looks like something from New York City, I had no idea that Philly looked like that back then!! One of the many reasons I hate how LA had a height ordinance =[
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #49  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2012, 10:14 AM
BrandonJXN's Avatar
BrandonJXN BrandonJXN is offline
Ascension
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Riverside, California
Posts: 5,225
^ Philadelphia had a height ordinance as well.
__________________
Washed Out
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #50  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2012, 7:11 PM
Yackemflaber69's Avatar
Yackemflaber69 Yackemflaber69 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 584
People love detroit
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2012, 8:35 PM
DecoJim's Avatar
DecoJim DecoJim is offline
Art Deco Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Detroit, Michigan
Posts: 743
That Philadelphia picture is impressive with all those 20-40 story buildings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeHundred View Post
^ Philadelphia had a height ordinance as well.
I had thought that the height restriction was a gentleman's agreement not to build higher than the Penn statue on City Hall but not an actual regulation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yackemflaber69 View Post
People love detroit
Or at least they did until circa 1960.
__________________
My Detroit and Lego architecture photos: flickr/decojim/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #52  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2012, 8:49 PM
DecoJim's Avatar
DecoJim DecoJim is offline
Art Deco Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Detroit, Michigan
Posts: 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Detroit - 1925
I believe that the picture is actually from 1924. To the left of the Dime Building and beyond the Penobscot Annex is the Book Cadillac Hotel under construction. The hotel was completed in late 1924.

The picture is very interesting; to see the city before any of the art-deco towers were constructed (or even the neo-Romanesque Buhl building or the neo-Gothic Cadillac Tower). It of course also shows a large number of lost buildings such as the Statler Hotel, Majestic Building, etc.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico Rommheim View Post
^Fan-tastic picture of Detroit. Funny how that big train station building was placed way out there. What was that neighbourhood like, light residential?
Even though you got the two buildings mixed up, you were still right in a way. The Michigan Central Station was built too far away from downtown. If the photo you commented on extended more to the left, you would of seen the station to the west in relative isolation, just as at the time the General Motors headquarters appeared to be way out there to the north.
__________________
My Detroit and Lego architecture photos: flickr/decojim/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #53  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2012, 10:21 PM
animatedmartian's Avatar
animatedmartian animatedmartian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,758
I find it odd that there's so many historical photos of Detroit. Other than New York City, it seems like Detroit was just an often photographed city. Maybe they knew they were taking photos of a future forgotten city...

Anyway, MCS relative to Downtown aerial. MCS is on the left.


http://dlxs.lib.wayne.edu/cgi/i/imag...-79204%5D79204

Another thing that's quirky about Detroit is that the skyline "goes" away from the riverfront. Detroit doesn't look like Chicago, basically. I know much of the waterfront was industrial, but even so, I would think that Jefferson Avenue ought to been just as developed if not more than Woodward.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #54  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2012, 4:32 AM
ChiSoxRox's Avatar
ChiSoxRox ChiSoxRox is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Posts: 1,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by aro1419 View Post
An arial photograph of Philadelphia from 1935 that has been posted a few times on this forum:

For those who want to try and match up buildings to names, here is the 1935 diagram for Philadelphia.
__________________
Like the pre-war masonry skyscrapers? Then check out my list of the tallest buildings in 1950.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #55  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2012, 9:14 AM
Mojeda101's Avatar
Mojeda101 Mojeda101 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: DTLA
Posts: 1,403
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeHundred View Post
^ Philadelphia had a height ordinance as well.
The majority of our old downtown is below 15 floors. I can see a good 20+ buildings over 20 floors. They may have had an ordinance, but no where near as extreme.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #56  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2012, 12:29 PM
Wrightguy0's Avatar
Wrightguy0 Wrightguy0 is offline
All aboard the Failboat
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Saint John NB
Posts: 389
in philly it was more of a gentleman's agreement to not build anything taller than the statue of William Penn atop city hall, which lasted until one liberty came and, quite controversially, broke the rules.

For LA i think it was because of how earthquakes effect the basin area whereas the peninsula in San Fransisco was more solid, the LA basin is composed mostly of sediment and has been described as "a bowl of jelly" in earthquakes, L.A. City hall had to undergo massive retrofits to keep it up to code and the last major quake damaged one prewar highrise building in downtown beyond repair, and left another empty for decades.

As much as it sucks, L.A. had a practical reason to limit building height before technology allowed man to counteract nature, Philly on the other hand, had no reason to and a bunch of stuffy old men agreed to limit height
__________________
I'f I had a nickel for every time someone presented me with a good idea, well, I'd have a nickel
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #57  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2012, 2:18 PM
animatedmartian's Avatar
animatedmartian animatedmartian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,758
But then LA had to still ruin it somehow by requiring helipads as a fire escape. It'd been interesting to see at least a few towers with spires on the top.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #58  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2012, 2:28 PM
Illithid Dude's Avatar
Illithid Dude Illithid Dude is offline
Paramoderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Santa Monica / New York City
Posts: 2,827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrightguy0 View Post
For LA i think it was because of how earthquakes effect the basin area whereas the peninsula in San Fransisco was more solid, the LA basin is composed mostly of sediment and has been described as "a bowl of jelly" in earthquakes, L.A. City hall had to undergo massive retrofits to keep it up to code and the last major quake damaged one prewar highrise building in downtown beyond repair, and left another empty for decades.
It was actually simply because L.A. didn't want to have a dense, tall, shadowed downtown like New York. There was one building, on Spring and 4th, that was built over the 150ft limit on the early 1900s, and it scared the city into instituting the ordinance.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #59  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2012, 2:37 PM
ChiSoxRox's Avatar
ChiSoxRox ChiSoxRox is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Posts: 1,751
Seattle is also earthquake prone, and it's had the nearly 500 foot Smith Tower since 1914. My understanding is that the technology for skyscrapers in earthquake prone cities has been there; it's more a issue of developers' desires, costs, and city planning.

More pics from Cushman:

Cleveland (both 1941)





The Terminal Tower was the tallest skyscraper outside of New York City until 1964 when Boston's Prudential Tower passed it.
__________________
Like the pre-war masonry skyscrapers? Then check out my list of the tallest buildings in 1950.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #60  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2012, 3:10 PM
installers installers is offline
Closed account
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 14
Wow Detroit is beautiful then and now
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 4:40 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.