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  #41  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2018, 4:45 PM
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  #42  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 2:50 PM
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  #43  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2018, 11:50 PM
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https://www.slideshare.net/CWS_2010/...s-water-system

The above graph appears to be from 1920, trending Winnipeg's anticipated population to 1960 when it was expected to hit the 1 million mark. It also shows Winnipeg's anticipated growth in comparison to other North American cities from a base population of 50,000 (so Winnipeg was to hit the 1 million mark six decades after reaching 50,000 in 1902). I just found the graph a little interesting as it comes after the Panama Canal and WW1, so it's not the "super boosterism" from Winnipeg's pre-WW1 boom era that was anticipating 4.5 million by 1984, however assuming the above growth trend remained relatively the same to the present day we would be a Vancouver sized city.
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  #44  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 1:58 AM
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It must have been absolutely fascinating living in Winnipeg during the boom years of 1900-1914. It was a time when the general mantra was "anything and everything possible" - Winnipeg's manifest destiny.

Today, it seems Winnipeg can be divided into three categories:

1. "Winnipeg will only get better" - these are the people who actually have a vision for the city, believing what lies ahead is a much more prosperous city. ~10% of the population falls into this category.
What would lead anyone to believe that Winnipeg will be "much more prosperous" in the future? Which economically transformative industries will develop, and why would they do so in Winnipeg? You can have all the visions you want, but by far the most likely scenario is that Winnipeg will continue to be much like it always has been (which is actually one of the appealing things about it, although no one here seems to pick up on that fact or to think about how to exploit the positive consequences of changelessness).
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  #45  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 2:28 AM
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What would lead anyone to believe that Winnipeg will be "much more prosperous" in the future? Which economically transformative industries will develop, and why would they do so in Winnipeg? You can have all the visions you want, but by far the most likely scenario is that Winnipeg will continue to be much like it always has been (which is actually one of the appealing things about it, although no one here seems to pick up on that fact or to think about how to exploit the positive consequences of changelessness).
You just made...........................the list.
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  #46  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 2:30 AM
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The sky is falling!!!!
THE SKY IS FALLING!!!!

oh wait.......................
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  #47  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 2:40 PM
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You just made...........................the list.
You should mention the he doesn't live in Winnipeg yet has a fetish for commenting about it. Might as well get it out.
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  #48  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 7:48 PM
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You just made...........................the list.
Which list? And what are all the little dots for?
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  #49  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 7:49 PM
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I think Ando did before , he had the misfortune of going to Toronto , I like his posts pretty informative some that I don't agree with completely but everyone is entitled to his/ her opinion . I do agree 100% that Winnipegs slower growth has been a blessing in disguise for the city mostly . The "list " he is referring to is Wpg boy Chris Jerichos list of people that piss him off ! ................. Lol
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  #50  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 8:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy6 View Post
What would lead anyone to believe that Winnipeg will be "much more prosperous" in the future? Which economically transformative industries will develop, and why would they do so in Winnipeg? You can have all the visions you want, but by far the most likely scenario is that Winnipeg will continue to be much like it always has been (which is actually one of the appealing things about it, although no one here seems to pick up on that fact or to think about how to exploit the positive consequences of changelessness).
I think it's mostly expats that want our city to be the "Mayberry" of Canada where things don't change. I believe it gives them a sense of comfort to think they can come back home for a visit and step back in time when life was much simpler. Sorry, those of us that live here want this city to progress and prosper. The change that is taking place is what allowed for the return of the Winnipeg Jets. Onwards and upwards!
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  #51  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 9:55 PM
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I think it's mostly expats that want our city to be the "Mayberry" of Canada where things don't change. I believe it gives them a sense of comfort to think they can come back home for a visit and step back in time when life was much simpler. Sorry, those of us that live here want this city to progress and prosper. The change that is taking place is what allowed for the return of the Winnipeg Jets. Onwards and upwards!
Nailed it.
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  #52  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2018, 1:57 PM
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One more interesting demographic, the city's own assessment figures of Winnipeg's growth during the boom era. The figures are for the city population only and do not include the municipalities of Greater Winnipeg (pre-unicity communities) that combined would have included roughly 50,000 more by 1914.
Census population in brackets.

1896: 37,983 (31,649)
1897: 38,733
1898: 39,384
1899: 40,112
1900: 42,534
1901: 44,778 (42,340)
1902: 48,411
1903: 56,741
1904: 67,262
1905: 79,975
1906: 101,057 (90,153)
1907: 111,729
1908: 118,252
1909: 122,390
1910: 132,720
1911: 151,958 (136,035)
1912: 185,000
1913: 201,000
1914: 203,255
1915: 212,889
1916: 201,981 (163,000)
1917: 183,000
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  #53  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2018, 4:16 PM
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What was the huge drop-off from 1916–1917?
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  #54  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2018, 4:21 PM
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what was the huge drop-off from 1916–1917?
ww1
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  #55  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2018, 5:04 PM
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People really started to pack up and move on (westward) around that time too. It was pretty common for people to arrive in Winnipeg around 1905, do well for 7 or 8 years, see things slow down drastically in 1913-14 and during the war, and decide to move on to the next boomtown, whether it was Brandon or Moose Jaw or Calgary or Vancouver, or often California. Jobs were easy to get and easy to lose in those days; people were very mobile.
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  #56  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2018, 1:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DowntownBooster View Post
I think it's mostly expats that want our city to be the "Mayberry" of Canada where things don't change. I believe it gives them a sense of comfort to think they can come back home for a visit and step back in time when life was much simpler. Sorry, those of us that live here want this city to progress and prosper. The change that is taking place is what allowed for the return of the Winnipeg Jets. Onwards and upwards!
That's possible, but not this expat.
I'm certainly not homesick but Winnipeg IS still my home no matter how far I go from it. Considering one of the (very minor) reasons I left Winnipeg was the lack of change, I'd be delighted if it were to experience some kind of boom.
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  #57  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2018, 10:47 PM
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Since 1990, I would consider this a period of change.
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  #58  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2018, 1:06 AM
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^ I would say that fairly little changed from 1990-2000. It's really only in the last 15 years that the city has started to change more visibly.
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  #59  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2018, 1:28 AM
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I meant since 1990 we had little change. Only now is there a boom of sorts. But you are correct. I felt that this construction and population “boom” were more recent. Surprisingly it was after 2000 that it really started to pick up. Amazing how time flies.
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  #60  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 5:39 PM
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Bringing this thread back from the dead again...I was reading through Alan Artibise's book "Gateway City: Documents on the City of Winnipeg 1873-1913", http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/books/mrs05.pdf , and there is an entire chapter dedicated to the City Planning Commission that is interesting to read through. This is the same planning commission mentioned in WFP book by Randy Turner I wrote about in the first post of this thread.

Here are a few interesting quotes (I posted a few of these in another thread sometime ago but not sure which one)

"...the detail of the street lamps and of everything else allowed upon the streets is a most important factor in educating the taste and stimulating the pride of citizens and in attracting the better classes of those who travel and of those who seek new homes." (pg. 228)

"...the idea of boulevards around the City should be encouraged and advantage taken of the River banks in the neighborhood of the City to establish picturesque driveways, so that a great natural opportunity which has been largely lost within the City itself may be worthily utilized wherever it still remains in the interest of the district as a whole." (pg. 232)

"...to create by architecture and by the landscape gardener's act pleasing vistas in the streets, effectively breaking wherever possible, by an attractive resting place for the eye...the City Council should take power to regulate the height of building in proportion to the width of streets...the heights and styles of architecture of adjoining buildings should be correlated." (pg. 232)

"The encouragement of rapid transportation to the suburbs, to relieve and prevent the formation of congested districts and the encourage of any tendency of the working class to move in to the out-lying districts." (pg. 236)

"...the general plan of the City should make it clear that railways will only be allowed to enter at certain points." (pg. 236)

"The building of a main boulevard around the City connecting the outside park system." (pg. 236)

"...a plan should endeavour to arrange for the location of a factory district or groups of factory districts." (pg. 236)

"The provincial government is about to commence work on the Capital building, which will be without a doubt, the finest in the Dominion, and the Citizens of Winnipeg will soon be obliged to build a City Hall in keeping with the City's important as the capital of Manitoba and the commercial Centre of Western Canada. What is more logical than that these two buildings should form a basis of a civic centre?" (pg. 237)

"...this joint Committee recommends a trans-city highway along the following route, Pembina, Osborne, Colony, Balmoral, Isabel and Salter, to give greater facility for north and south traffic..." (pg. 237)

"...the present City Hall and Market Site be transformed into a Public Square similar to St. James' Place, Montreal." (pg. 237)

"The scheme...calls for the widening of Vaughan Street...creating a "Mall" or "Plaza" 134 feet wide, connecting the Provincial group of buildings dominated by the dome of the Capital Building, centered on the Mall to the south, with the City Hall to the north, also centered on the axis of the Mall facing the Capital. The Plaza furnishes an opportunity in the future for the location of buildings which will be required from time to time in the City's development, such as a Public Library, Museum, Art Gallery, Post Office, Auditorium and other buildings of a similar nature." (pg. 237-238)

"...while the scheme is not entirely dependent upon the City Hall project, it is greatly enhanced by the establishment of a City Hall Park, bounded by the Trans-City Highway on the west, and the City Hall centered on the axis of the Mall. The City Hall Park should include all the property in the triangular space between Kennedy, Balmoral and Ellice, and Balmoral Street should be widened to one hundred feet and become a pan of the Trans-City Highway." (pg. 238)

"In the laying out of new streets, changes in direction or alignment should be made to break the dreary monotony of an endless vista." (pg. 245)

"Much can be done, before realty values become prohibitive, in the way of decorating our streets with small squares adjacent to the busy thoroughfares." (pg. 246)

"Legislation should be secured to regulate and restrict the rapidly growing nuisance of advertising signs and billboards...Regulations as to size of signs, height and style of billboards, and size of letters to be employed would do much towards improving existing conditions." (pg. 246)

"...buildings in the business districts should be made to conform to a common standard of height, and, in any case, it is recommended that the height of buildings be rigidly regulated by legislation to one and a half times the width of streets on which they face..." (pg. 246)

"...your Committee recommends that steps be taken to prevent further buildings being put up along the river banks, and that sections of driveways be constructed along the Assiniboine and Red Rivers..." (pg. 246)

"The extension of Scotia Street along the river bank to the new Kildonan Park...continuing this driveway to St. Andrew's Locks...The diversion of Crescent Road to follow the river bank and out to Tuxedo Park." (pg. 246)

Some of these plans were started but never completed due to the slowdown in Winnipeg's pre-WW1 booming economy and others never got off the table, like the City Hall. With a slight change in the timeline of events, one wonders how the city might look if WW1 had been delayed by only a year or two.
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