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  #1  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 4:54 PM
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Oldest cities/towns in province/state?

What are the oldest towns/cities in your state/province?
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  #2  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 4:59 PM
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Illinois:

Quote:

Peoria

Established in 1691 by the French explorer Henri de Tonti, Peoria is the oldest European settlement in Illinois. Originally known as Fort Clark, it received its current name when the County of Peoria organized in 1825. The city was named after the Peoria tribe, a member of the Illinois Confederation.
source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peoria...0Confederation.



i honestly had no idea that illinois had a european settlement as early as the late 17th century.

you learn something new everyday.
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  #3  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 5:00 PM
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Considered to be the oldest town in Texas, Nacogdoches was founded in 1779 by Don Antonio Gil Y'Barbo. This quaint little town is booming with history and stories from years past beginning with the Caddo Indians, who lived in the area before the Spanish, through the present day.
https://www.ci.nacogdoches.tx.us/601...0present%20day.
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Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 5:21 PM
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That would be Bath, NC, founded in 1705.

(Not counting, of course the Roanoke Colony, which got lost somewhere on that island circa 1590.)
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Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 5:45 PM
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Originally Posted by hauntedheadnc View Post
That would be Bath, NC, founded in 1705.

(Not counting, of course the Roanoke Colony, which got lost somewhere on that island circa 1590.)
I saw a documentary about the Roanoke Colony, very interesting.
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Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 6:10 PM
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Since someone did Texas, I'll do New York: Albany founded in 1614 as Ft. Orange. 10 years before that small upstart further down the Hudson...
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Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 6:37 PM
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oldest town in Idaho is Franklin, founded in 1860.

oldest known settlement is Cooper's Ferry which is approx. 16,000 years old.

https://www.livescience.com/america-...s-by-boat.html

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Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 6:54 PM
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I could be wrong, but Hudson Bay and by extension James Bay in 1611..Henry Hudson claimed it for England, and it was a fur trading post..Both Moose Factory and Moosonee sprang from that, and the great Hudson Bay fur trading company was founded..It later became what we now know as The Hudson's Bay company, or just "The Bay", which is a large department store chain in Canada, and is one of if not the oldest company in North America still operating today.It's hard to believe that you go into their stores now to buy Clarke's dress shoes, upscale leather furniture, and Maytag ovens considering it's heritage.Other then that, (Fort Frontenac) Kingston - 1673, and ( Fort Rouillé ) Toronto 1750..Of course this is only counting European settlements,and there may be older settlements In Ontario that I overlooked here..Excellent thread idea btw!
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Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 7:44 PM
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Answers will vary depending on whether we're talking about first founded or recorded/named settlement, first city/town founded that carries the same name today, first chartered/incorporated municipality, etc. And i assume are we talking oldest European settlement.

For Pennsylvania:

Tinicum Island (1643) - first permanent settlement

Upland (1644), present day Chester (named 1682) - first city

Last edited by pj3000; Jul 2, 2020 at 1:58 AM.
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Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 7:49 PM
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  #11  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 8:33 PM
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What is now the US state of California has had indigenous people living in it in settlements for thousands of years before the white man came, but for simplicity's sake, San Diego is considered the "oldest city" in California, having been founded July 16, 1769.

Los Angeles was founded September 4, 1781, near the native Tongva village of Yangna. Modern place names in LA/LA area are Hispanicized pronunciations of native villages: Cahuenga, Topanga, Tujunga, Azusa...

When California became a US state in 1850, a number of cities incorporated as US cities the same year:

Sacramento (February 27, 1850)
Benicia, San Diego, San Jose (all 3 on March 27,1850)
Los Angeles (April 4,1850)
Santa Barbara (April 9, 1850)
San Francisco (April 15, 1850)
Stockton (July 23, 1850)
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Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 9:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boisebro View Post
oldest town in Idaho is Franklin, founded in 1860.

oldest known settlement is Cooper's Ferry which is approx. 16,000 years old.

https://www.livescience.com/america-...s-by-boat.html

I wonder if that's the newest "oldest" town (neglecting of course Native American settlements... Cahokia way predates Peoria, in Illinois). I can't imagine other places were so late in having a town (Sitka, Alaska was founded in 1799, for example).
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Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 9:57 PM
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For São Paulo state, it's São Vicente, in 1532. It shares its island with Santos, wealthier and well-known, busiest port in Latin America.
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  #14  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 10:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SIGSEGV View Post
I wonder if that's the newest "oldest" town (neglecting of course Native American settlements... Cahokia way predates Peoria, in Illinois). I can't imagine other places were so late in having a town (Sitka, Alaska was founded in 1799, for example).

Arizona, South Dakota, and Wyoming have "newer" oldest towns. There may be others; not sure.
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Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 10:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boisebro View Post
Arizona, South Dakota, and Wyoming have "newer" oldest towns. There may be others; not sure.
Yeah, Arizona's oldest incorporation is "newer" than 1860, although I don't really think formal incorporation is a great measure of the "oldest cities/towns":

Oraibi on the Hopi Reservation was settled in 1100 AD and is one of if not the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in North America.

The first permanent European settlement in Arizona was Tubac in 1752 (but it has not been continuously inhabited, as the European settlements were depopulated during conflicts with Native Americans).

The old, still extent mission church in Tucson dates to 1700. The first military fort was built in 1775, and Tucson was part of Sonora, Mexico when Mexico gained independence in 1821. And then as you mention the Tucson became the oldest incorporated town/city in the Arizona territory in 1877.
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Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 3:54 AM
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For Florida, it’s St. Augustine or San Agustin, founded in 1565. It’s also the oldest continuous European settlement in the continental US.


So if we can’t agree that Florida is “Southern”, we can agree that it’s more American than anywhere else in this country.
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  #17  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 4:04 AM
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Ho boy...oldest continuously inhabited settlement, or places that existed centuries ago that were abandoned/wiped out? Because Arizona has a fuck-ton of the latter, courtesy of the HoHoKam and Anasazzi.
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Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 2:05 PM
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Moose Factory, in the far north of Ontario was founded as a trading post in 1673 (as Moose Fort) by the Hudson's Bay Company as mentioned by Razor, and has more or less been continually occupied since then as far as I'm aware. Wasn't much of a town then though.

Fort Frontenac, in present-day Kingston was also established by the French in 1673 but abandoned between 1758 and 1783, when the British re-built it and founded the settlement of Kingston around it.

Windsor was first settled as an agricultural community in 1749 (as la Petite Côte), and has been continually settled since then. It generally seems to be considered as Ontario's "longest continuously inhabited city".

Fort Rouillé was also founded by the French in present-day Toronto in 1750, but like most other French forts was abandoned in 1759; until the British founded the town of York in 1793. Toronto was also home to several indigenous settlements since at least 1615 (the Iroquoian community of Teiaiagon chief among them), but likewise, these were all abandoned as the land changed hands between tribes and are not considered to be continuously inhabited.
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Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 2:50 PM
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  #20  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 3:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye Native 001 View Post
Ho boy...oldest continuously inhabited settlement, or places that existed centuries ago that were abandoned/wiped out? Because Arizona has a fuck-ton of the latter, courtesy of the HoHoKam and Anasazzi.
I read an article once about the Anasazi and how severe droughts brought about their demise. I think that same tribe were the early inventers of what we're believed to be the first apartment complexes. Either them or the Pueblo.
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