HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #61  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 9:08 AM
muppet's Avatar
muppet muppet is offline
if I sang out of tune
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: London
Posts: 5,079
Is there a resurgence in homegrown American food in the US (think Coca-cola chicken, southern BBQ, burgers, meatloaf, Cajun, Creole etc -but upmarket)? I think pretty much everywhere in Europe it's been all about native cuisine now. There was a time London used to have more Michelin stars represented for more international cuisines than any other city (notably French, Japanese, Chinese, Indian, Italian, Peruvian, Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, Baltic etc), now those stars are dominated with British menus. A big trend thanks to Heston Blumenthal, Marco Pierre White, Gordon Ramsay, Petersham Nurseries and St John back in the day. It says something it took foreigners like Skye Gyngell (Australian) and Margot Henderson (New Zealander) to promote British cuisine so well.




www.designmynight.com

https://www.timeout.com/london/restaurants/sparrow


https://static.standard.co.uk/s3fs-p...closeup-1.jpeg

Last edited by muppet; Jun 29, 2020 at 10:31 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #62  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 12:43 PM
hauntedheadnc's Avatar
hauntedheadnc hauntedheadnc is online now
Sentence fragments!
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Asheville, NC - "Home of the Pernicious Poem Place"
Posts: 9,246
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Nice. Yea, that's another great place.

I also wanted to add Asheville surprised me in general. I was expecting something like Charlotte, Raleigh etc.
If you meant that you were expecting that same sterile, "SimCity"-esque feel, well... Tee hee, you're silly!

What I think might surprise people coming to Asheville is that, when you consider our reputation as a genteel, upscale, free-spirited and happy kind of place... There is a long-established homeless encampment, almost a town of its own, under the McDowell Street Viaduct from which you can literally see the gates of Biltmore Estate. It's not exactly the developing world, but it's still jarring to be down there under the bridge and look up, and realize what you're looking at.
__________________
"He who does not punish evil, commands it to be done." -- Leonardo da Vinci
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #63  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 1:59 PM
LA21st LA21st is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 3,908
Lol.
Well, I went there when I was younger and didn't know much about it.
But I had traveled a good amount in North Carolina until then.
Asheville definitely stood out, and I still remember it.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #64  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 3:37 PM
sopas ej's Avatar
sopas ej sopas ej is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South Pasadena, California
Posts: 4,366
For Los Angeles, everyone has these very varied preconceived notions about it, so much so that, depending on their experience, it either meets or exceeds their expectations, or disappoints; they come away loving it, hating it, and/or everything in between. Los Angeles is also very geographically huge, so, visitors will have very subjective experiences depending on which part of LA they spend most of their time in, or if they traveled around this very large metropolis; if they spent their time taking public transportation vs. driving around to get to where they want to go. I think some people are intimidated about driving in LA, and its size. I also think some people are actually even scared about driving in LA, and scared of taking public transportation in LA. It's funny, because back in the early 90s, a Canadian pen-pal I had from Edmonton came to visit me; he stayed at a hotel in Santa Monica, took the bus EVERYWHERE, and loved his vacation in LA. He stayed for about a week. So I think too, it depends on how adventurous a visitor is.

But the one universal thing that many around the world think LA has---good weather. I'm typing this right now, a week into summer, looking out my office window from work at 8:30-ish am... and it's dark and gray and misty and very cool. We are going through our June Gloom period, when basically, it's cloudy and cool from morning until about noon, give or take an hour. Sometimes it even drizzles. We go through this in May, too, and we call it May Gray. Last year, my Dutch friend visited me and my partner and stayed here for a week, and for 4 of the days he was here, IT RAINED. He was expecting sunny weather, too. I said "you brought the weather from Utrecht with you." Hehe I even found myself apologizing for the weather, and he said "It's no big deal, I can handle rain."

For me, I LOVE this kind of weather, because most of the year, it is indeed sunny, and especially in summer, it can get very hot. So I appreciate the nice cool cloudy weather when we do get it, because basically from July until mid-October, it's gonna be hot, though people visiting from other parts of the US LOVE it for some reason. I guess because we don't get the humidity that other parts of the US do.

I've had relatives visit from Chicago and New Jersey during winter, and it's funny to me because I will ask them "are you cold?" And they'll say "PLEASE, this isn't cold!" And then when nighttime arrives and we're still out and about, I can tell they're cold, hehe. And then when we go out again at night, they'll bring their jacket.

I recently watched some travel vloggers on Youtube talk about their experiences visiting LA. Some love it, and some are let down by it; I saw some travel vloggers say that they were disappointed with LA's weather... and sure enough, they were here in late June/early July. It amuses me too the things they said they did in LA, and I'm all thinking "well, no wonder you didn't care for it." The funny thing is, there are a number of videos of people who "try In-N-Out for the first time." PLEASE. When my Dutch friend visited last year, I made it a point to take him to authentic Thai restaurants, Armenian-Lebanese places, very good Mexican restaurants that are totally in the barrio, really good sushi places, Persian ice cream... none of that fast-food shit. He loved it all. And I also made it a point to drive through areas I always drive through, the really gritty parts of LA that tourists probably usually don't see, like El Sereno, East LA, etc. He's very well-traveled, too, he's been to every continent except Antarctica... and he came away saying that while he was in LA, he often felt like he was in Asia. Haha!
__________________
"If the climate were a bank, the U.S. would have already saved it."

---Hugo Chávez
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #65  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 4:13 PM
yuriandrade's Avatar
yuriandrade yuriandrade is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 835
As the SSP is very North American-centric, everything about São Paulo might come up as a surprise.

I guess most people are unaware of the presence of Atlantic Rainforest on the southern and northern tips of city proper. About 1/4 of the municipality is covered by thick forest, but as it's not mingled with the city as it happens in Rio de Janeiro, people don't relate it to São Paulo at all.

EDIT: I reminded of another, well-known in Brazil, but maybe not abroad: São Paulo is home, by far, of the largest Japanese diaspora in the world, counting 400k-500k people or so.
__________________
Londrina - Frankfurt
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #66  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 4:18 PM
pj3000's Avatar
pj3000 pj3000 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Pittsburgh & Miami
Posts: 4,571
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuriandrade View Post
As the SSP is very North American-centric, everything about São Paulo might come up as a surprise.

I guess most people are unaware of the presence of Atlantic Rainforest on the southern and northern tips of city proper. About 1/4 of the municipality is covered by thick forest, but as it's not mingled with the city as it happens in Rio de Janeiro, people don't relate it to São Paulo at all.

EDIT: I reminded of another, well-known in Brazil, but maybe not abroad: São Paulo is home, by far, of the largest Japanese diaspora in the world, counting 400k-500k people or so.
The most beautiful women I’ve ever seen are in São Paulo.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #67  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 4:37 PM
Atlas's Avatar
Atlas Atlas is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 447
Honestly, visiting downtown Salt Lake City might challenge some preconceived notions. SLC is the least Mormon city in Utah despite hosting the capital of the LDS church.

There's a very interesting 140+ year history of conflict within the city between the Mormon and non-Mormon factions, and now the city itself is solidly controlled by the latter. This is one reason why the city doesn't receive much support from the state government, and sometimes is actively undermined by it. In fact, SLC is currently suing the state over a development/sovereignty issue.

The real Mormonland begins about 30 minutes south at the Point of the Mountain.
__________________
Join us on the SLC Development subreddit
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #68  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 4:55 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 3,528
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuriandrade View Post
As the SSP is very North American-centric, everything about São Paulo might come up as a surprise.

I guess most people are unaware of the presence of Atlantic Rainforest on the southern and northern tips of city proper. About 1/4 of the municipality is covered by thick forest, but as it's not mingled with the city as it happens in Rio de Janeiro, people don't relate it to São Paulo at all.

EDIT: I reminded of another, well-known in Brazil, but maybe not abroad: São Paulo is home, by far, of the largest Japanese diaspora in the world, counting 400k-500k people or so.
I visited São Paulo first, but I expected it to be more like Rio de Janeiro (warm, sunny, beach oriented). It's less warm, less sunny, and doesn't have any beaches.

Another thing that surprised me about São Paulo is that I expected it to be much less car-oriented than it is in reality. It is not quite as car centric as younger North American cities, but you can tell that a lot of it was deliberately designed to be car-friendly.

For Rio, I was surprised by the intensity of the city. It is Manhattan on the beach. The mountainous topography was also a bit of a surprise the first time around. And, it also felt much less dangerous than I expected.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #69  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 5:47 PM
yuriandrade's Avatar
yuriandrade yuriandrade is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by pj3000 View Post
The most beautiful women I’ve ever seen are in São Paulo.
São Paulo is very diverse, but the average look is probably Mediterranean, which is nice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
I visited São Paulo first, but I expected it to be more like Rio de Janeiro (warm, sunny, beach oriented). It's less warm, less sunny, and doesn't have any beaches.
Indeed. São Paulo is on top of a 800m high plateau. It will be always much cooler than Rio. Beaches are nearby though (closest 60 km away), but they are completely different animals in this regard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
Another thing that surprised me about São Paulo is that I expected it to be much less car-oriented than it is in reality. It is not quite as car centric as younger North American cities, but you can tell that a lot of it was deliberately designed to be car-friendly.
Spot on. São Paulo has always had some sort of suburban mentality and we can see that in the city. Massive number of cars, intrusive freeways and the urge to leave the city every weekend.

It's only recently, in this century, the city started to embrace its massive urbanity, which is very nice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
For Rio, I was surprised by the intensity of the city. It is Manhattan on the beach. The mountainous topography was also a bit of a surprise the first time around. And, it also felt much less dangerous than I expected.
Rio has a very strong brand since ever and it's definitely not a Los Angeles, San Francisco, Cape Town or Sydney: it's very high densities by the beach.
__________________
Londrina - Frankfurt
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #70  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 8:06 PM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 13,403
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppet View Post
Is there a resurgence in homegrown American food in the US (think Coca-cola chicken, southern BBQ, burgers, meatloaf, Cajun, Creole etc -but upmarket)?
With the exception of "Coca Cola chicken", which I've never encountered (I'm more familiar with Coca Cola glazed ham--American "country", that is artisanally, preserved pork products are a "thing" in their own right) and, in any case, would be a single dish, not a cuisine, the rest of that stuff never went away or diminished and is as popular as ever.

When it comes to Cajun/Creole, a new chef (Emeril, Paul Prudhomme, Donald Link) periodically arrises. You can always go to New Orleans and see who's hot at the moment. The best BBQ will always come from places Michelin never heard of and wouldn't think of visiting. Mostly the same with comfort food like meatloaf and burgers. Never seen a star handed out on "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives"

Until Hurricane Katrina (along with its founders/proprietors reaching retirement age) ended this homely place on Baronne St. in New Orleans called Uglesich's, it may have served up some of the best Cajun/Creole food ever cooked:


http://www.croatia.org/crown/article...estaurant.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #71  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 9:17 PM
LosAngelesSportsFan's Avatar
LosAngelesSportsFan LosAngelesSportsFan is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 7,031
Quote:
Originally Posted by badrunner View Post
LA has a lot of surprises in store for visitors who aren't too familiar with the city. It's a city that rewards exploration, like no other.

I like to take out-of-state visitors up to the local mountains, either hiking or driving up the Angeles Crest highway. As the elevation road markers tick past 5000ft, then 6000, then 7000, they'll sometimes blurt out "This is the highest I've ever been in my life!"

Video Link
Indeed. Even long time LA residents have no idea the wonders that the mountains in LA have. I recently took a friend who has lived in LA for over a decade to Angeles National forest and she had no idea we had 10,000 foot peaks and alpine forests 45 min from Downtown LA
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #72  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2020, 2:54 AM
muppet's Avatar
muppet muppet is offline
if I sang out of tune
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: London
Posts: 5,079
London had a craze for upmarket US food circa 2015, mostly posh burgers, pizzas, mac n cheese reinventions and Southern BBQ with grade A meat. Places like Lobster & Burger, Meat Liquor, Blues Kitchen. Even Hawksmoor and Heston Blumenthal featured Mac n Cheese (eg with beef shin or goats cheese and truffle oil). I used to think US food was a bit naff, but now hold it in high acclaim -always assumed the resurgence was being mirrored Stateside.

- The current 'trend' is authentic Chinese, Indian and Italian - the retro stalwarts but getting away from the takeaway/homegrown versions we've suffered too long. Israeli/Palestinian food too (salads, grills, grains), Colombian/ Venezuelan streetfood (arepas, BBQ) and posh Peruvian (ceviche, steak, exotic veg). Oh and vegan, that's bloody everywhere, at the bottom of almost every menu like a bad rash.

More food porn -if ever in the big smoke, do seek out American food in the centre (but avoid the chicken palaces in the burbs, no one just no one beats KFC)






Last edited by muppet; Jun 30, 2020 at 3:48 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #73  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2020, 5:34 PM
ssiguy ssiguy is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: White Rock BC
Posts: 7,756
For Vancouver people tend to think nothing but clean, shiny, and prosperous but the city's Downtown Eastside is a cesspool and truly Canada's only urban slum. People shoot-up right on the streets and meth overdose deaths are literally a daily affair. It was home to Canada's biggest mass murderer who killed nearly 70 prostitutes over a 20 year span and the city did nothing about it.

Conversely people tend to think it rains here all the time while in reality it's just a fall & winter event and summers can go weeks without seeing a cloud little alone any rain.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #74  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2020, 6:05 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 20,758
I don't think there are any "shocking" areas, but NYC definitely has unexpected areas that confound stereotype.

Most would be surprised to know there's a section of the Bronx that looks like backcountry Connecticut, where people keep horses on their properties and ride them on city streets, just blocks from the subway:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8944...7i16384!8i8192

Most would be surprised at weird architecture and street scenes in the most Orthodox sections of the city, which look like nowhere else in North America:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.6972...7i16384!8i8192

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.6999...7i16384!8i8192

And most would be surprised to know that much of Staten Island is very hilly, with weird, gritty, Pittsburgh-like microneighborhoods in the valleys:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.6376...7i16384!8i8192
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #75  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2020, 6:18 PM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 13,403
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppet View Post
London had a craze for upmarket US food circa 2015, mostly posh burgers, pizzas, mac n cheese reinventions and Southern BBQ with grade A meat. Places like Lobster & Burger, Meat Liquor, Blues Kitchen. Even Hawksmoor and Heston Blumenthal featured Mac n Cheese (eg with beef shin or goats cheese and truffle oil). I used to think US food was a bit naff, but now hold it in high acclaim -always assumed the resurgence was being mirrored Stateside.
To my taste, the best versions of American classics are the authentic, genuine ones. Southern BBQ made with "grade A meat" (not sure what that is) may well be less flavorfull than what some old black man turns out in a shack out on the highway from a hog he or a friend may have slaughtered. I was kind of taken aback when I first encountered San Francisco versions of southern classics I grew up with, made with "baby artisanal vegetables".

BBQ, of course, is a style of cooking, not a cuisine or particular dish. In the US we have arguments over pork BBQ Carolina style (and there are variations of that) vs beef BBQ Texas style (with which I am less familiar, having spent a number of years in the Carolinas but never lived in Texas). The thing all BBQ has in common is simply long, low-heat cooking, preferably over a smoky heat source. You can cook anything that way and somebody around the country somewhere probably does. In the northwest they certainly do it with fish.

Upscale burgers are indeed a "thing", made with Wagyu beef mainly. I am not a devotee so I can't expound on it. All ground meat being tender, I've never understood the point, especially since, once again, the fatty tenderness of Wagyu (and its apotheosis from Kobe) is buttery mouth feel, not necessarily flavor (especially when slathered with a strong-tasting cheese or condiments).

When it comes to things like pizza or mac and cheese, again the humblest dives can produce the best-tasting versions . . . or not. There are fans of the different styles like the pies from coal-fired ovens that reach 700+ degrees in NY and leave blackened bubbles on the crust or the deep dish (or square-shaped) pies in various parts of the midwest. But in each style, fancy higher-priced sellers aren't necessarily better than what the immigrant on the corner turns out (although the coal-fired oven joints tend to be old because cost and environmental regulation make it hard to open a new one of those). In San Francisco, when it comes to any Italian food, we have a different tradition having not had the southern Italian/Sicilian immigration the East Coast had and our Italian food tends more toward northern Italy and does try to emphasize higher-priced, "authentic" (or at least "artisanal", produced locally in our Mediterranean climate) ingredients. The result though, can be kind of unsatisfying to someone like me who grew up with the East Coast peasant versions.

Finally, let's talk Cajun and Creole. If there's a trend, it's to distinguish the two. Donald Link makes the point in his cookbook in relation to jambalaya: "The main difference is that in the Creole version, the rice is cooked in a tomatoey sauce that might include shrimp along with meat and sausage. The Cajun approach is more rustic. Searing and caramelizing the meat and onions individually prior to simmering everything together . . . ." He also puts a lot of emphasis on reducing and concentrating the broth (chicken) used. This is all pretty basic technique--nothing fancy, just a decision about what style in what tradition you really want to cook, and about authenticity.

If we do have an upmarketization going on, maybe it's with Mexican food. There's a recognition that the Tex-Mex street food one finds along the border is not all Mexico has to offer and in cities one finds more and more places exploring the upscale cuisines of Mexico City but also of various Mexican regions not so near the US like the Yucatan (and probably not especially familiar to the proprietor of your neighborhood taqueria). People like Rick Bayless and Diana Kennedy started this trend but many people are carrying it forward.

Last edited by Pedestrian; Jun 30, 2020 at 6:30 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #76  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 3:34 AM
SIGSEGV's Avatar
SIGSEGV SIGSEGV is online now
>~< , QED!
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: South Loop, Chicago
Posts: 2,223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
To my taste, the best versions of American classics are the authentic, genuine ones. Southern BBQ made with "grade A meat" (not sure what that is) may well be less flavorfull than what some old black man turns out in a shack out on the highway from a hog he or a friend may have slaughtered. I was kind of taken aback when I first encountered San Francisco versions of southern classics I grew up with, made with "baby artisanal vegetables".

BBQ, of course, is a style of cooking, not a cuisine or particular dish. In the US we have arguments over pork BBQ Carolina style (and there are variations of that) vs beef BBQ Texas style (with which I am less familiar, having spent a number of years in the Carolinas but never lived in Texas). The thing all BBQ has in common is simply long, low-heat cooking, preferably over a smoky heat source. You can cook anything that way and somebody around the country somewhere probably does. In the northwest they certainly do it with fish.

Upscale burgers are indeed a "thing", made with Wagyu beef mainly. I am not a devotee so I can't expound on it. All ground meat being tender, I've never understood the point, especially since, once again, the fatty tenderness of Wagyu (and its apotheosis from Kobe) is buttery mouth feel, not necessarily flavor (especially when slathered with a strong-tasting cheese or condiments).

When it comes to things like pizza or mac and cheese, again the humblest dives can produce the best-tasting versions . . . or not. There are fans of the different styles like the pies from coal-fired ovens that reach 700+ degrees in NY and leave blackened bubbles on the crust or the deep dish (or square-shaped) pies in various parts of the midwest. But in each style, fancy higher-priced sellers aren't necessarily better than what the immigrant on the corner turns out (although the coal-fired oven joints tend to be old because cost and environmental regulation make it hard to open a new one of those). In San Francisco, when it comes to any Italian food, we have a different tradition having not had the southern Italian/Sicilian immigration the East Coast had and our Italian food tends more toward northern Italy and does try to emphasize higher-priced, "authentic" (or at least "artisanal", produced locally in our Mediterranean climate) ingredients. The result though, can be kind of unsatisfying to someone like me who grew up with the East Coast peasant versions.

Finally, let's talk Cajun and Creole. If there's a trend, it's to distinguish the two. Donald Link makes the point in his cookbook in relation to jambalaya: "The main difference is that in the Creole version, the rice is cooked in a tomatoey sauce that might include shrimp along with meat and sausage. The Cajun approach is more rustic. Searing and caramelizing the meat and onions individually prior to simmering everything together . . . ." He also puts a lot of emphasis on reducing and concentrating the broth (chicken) used. This is all pretty basic technique--nothing fancy, just a decision about what style in what tradition you really want to cook, and about authenticity.

If we do have an upmarketization going on, maybe it's with Mexican food. There's a recognition that the Tex-Mex street food one finds along the border is not all Mexico has to offer and in cities one finds more and more places exploring the upscale cuisines of Mexico City but also of various Mexican regions not so near the US like the Yucatan (and probably not especially familiar to the proprietor of your neighborhood taqueria). People like Rick Bayless and Diana Kennedy started this trend but many people are carrying it forward.
Have you ever been to the taqueria in the gas station in Pescadero? (don't know if it's still around). That place has (had?) the best tacos I've ever had.
__________________
And here the air that I breathe isn't dead. Trump delenda est.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #77  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 3:41 AM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 13,111
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #78  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 5:27 AM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
ψ Sailor of the Mind ψ
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Jersey - Somerset County
Posts: 32,702
Many people might think or expect this of NJ:


Credit: Getty Images







But may be shocked to find out:



Credit: Paterson Great Falls via planetware


Reply With Quote
     
     
  #79  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 6:40 AM
homebucket homebucket is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: The Bay
Posts: 1,133
Quote:
Originally Posted by SIGSEGV View Post
Have you ever been to the taqueria in the gas station in Pescadero? (don't know if it's still around). That place has (had?) the best tacos I've ever had.
It’s still around and doing well. Just had it this past weekend when I dusted off the ol’ Lotus and went for a nice little drive up and down the coast. Fantastic little hidden gem.

https://yelp.to/qTKq/f5DbTcc9K7
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #80  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 11:23 AM
Acajack's Avatar
Acajack Acajack is online now
Astineux
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Canada (see below*)
Posts: 45,862
Most of the older parts of my city look like a working class francophone Quebec mill town. Which is what it was, until we became a secondary centre for Canada's federal government. Our newer areas reflect that and look like middle class and upper class suburbia.

That said, we have a few blocks in the middle of one of our older poorer districts that looks straight out of New England:

https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.48011...7i16384!8i8192

It was actually built by New Englanders, for the bosses of the paper mill they owned.

Two blocks away it looks like this (where the workers lived):

https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.47899...7i16384!8i8192
__________________
*An assembly of shareholders that likes to pretend it is a close-knit family, in order to maintain access to grandpa's inheritance.

Still a really nice group of people to spend Christmas dinner with, though.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 7:47 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.