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  #81  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2016, 4:47 PM
Brizzy82 Brizzy82 is offline
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to me Fargo always feels a lot bigger than it's population would indicate.

Google says the metro population of Fargo is 228,000 vs Regina 210,000

I know metro populations are calculated a bit differently in the US, but they must be somewhat similar. Regina definitely has the upper hand when it comes to skyline, but Fargo feels fairly "busy" IMO. Especially when you come into town, where I29 meets I94, lots of traffic passing through there.
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  #82  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2016, 5:01 PM
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^ Really? I always felt it was the opposite. Regina has the downtown of a big city, Fargo has the downtown of a small town... it feels more like Brandon than Regina. I guess Fargo can brag about having a second downtown (Moorhead), but that one is practically on a Steinbach scale.

I've spent time in both cities and I've never had a hard time keeping myself entertained in Regina, while Fargo, at least in the winter, is pretty boring.

The only thing Fargo beats Regina at is the unbelievable sprawl, which is something the US generally excels at. With all the sprawl in West Fargo I guess it feels like you could be in a bigger city.
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  #83  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2016, 5:06 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
^ Really? I always felt it was the opposite. Regina has the downtown of a big city, Fargo has the downtown of a small town... it feels more like Brandon than Regina. I guess Fargo can brag about having a second downtown (Moorhead), but that one is practically on a Steinbach scale.

I've spent time in both cities and I've never had a hard time keeping myself entertained in Regina, while Fargo, at least in the winter, is pretty boring.

The only thing Fargo beats Regina at is the unbelievable sprawl, which is something the US generally excels at. With all the sprawl in West Fargo I guess it feels like you could be in a bigger city.
I agree with you about downtown Fargo not being nearly as big feeling as Regina, maybe it's the sprawl you mentioned that makes it Fargo feel larger than it is.
Maybe it's all the (former) Manitoba traffic on the streets that makes it feel busier also
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  #84  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2016, 5:16 PM
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Hmm....
 
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Also, Regina's metro is up over 240k now.
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  #85  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2016, 5:19 PM
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Also, Regina's metro is up over 240k now.
So Regina is probably a fair bit bigger than Fargo given that the latter's metro population is smaller, and using the usual US metro techniques, probably includes every person 100 miles in every direction to arrive at that number.
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  #86  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2016, 5:26 AM
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Downtown Fargo may not have much in terms of skyline, but it's definitely lively and vibrant for a city of its size. Most who go down for the weekend and shop at West Acres and the box stores out there don't know about the hidden gem that is Broadway.
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  #87  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2016, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Bdog View Post
Downtown Fargo may not have much in terms of skyline, but it's definitely lively and vibrant for a city of its size. Most who go down for the weekend and shop at West Acres and the box stores out there don't know about the hidden gem that is Broadway.
It's not bad, but Regina's is much better when you put them side by side.
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  #88  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2016, 2:13 PM
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Regina city pop is about 2x Fargo city. Winnipeg City pop is actually bigger than Minneapolis but the Minneapolis' metro is 5x bigger.
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  #89  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2016, 2:32 PM
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Regina city pop is about 2x Fargo city. Winnipeg City pop is actually bigger than Minneapolis but the Minneapolis' metro is 5x bigger.
It's weird. US cities are so spread out and usually contain a bunch of cities and towns within a huge metro area, unlike Canadian cities which are mostly just big cities. I find it hard to believe that metro Minneapolis has 3.8 million people while Greater Vancouver has only 2.5 million. Vancouver feels like a bigger city to me. So yeah, Regina feels much more like a big city than Fargo, just like Winnipeg feels much bigger than Des Moines, IA (metro pop. 611,000).
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  #90  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2016, 2:56 PM
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^ I'd believe the pop. numbers for Minneapolis and Vancouver. One is a sprawling beast built on the open prairie, the other is a dense city hemmed in by various geographical constraints which makes it feel far bigger.

In much the same way, Hong Kong and Houston both have roughly 7 million people... one feels unfathomably big and dense, while the other feels kind of like a super-Edmonton.
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  #91  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2016, 5:29 AM
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Manitoba and Saskatchewan have a lot in common to be sure.

We're both not Ontario!

And, we're both definitely in the west! Although, Manitoba is more classically Midwest like Illinois, Missouri or Wisconsin.

Hell, Winnipeg is a near body double for St.Louis having been there many times.

I've never been in a large American city that felt so much like home.

But, perhaps the best comparison is between Minnesota and North Dakota. The later being resource rich and agrarian and the former being more urbanized and eastern looking.

I would argue the Manitoba is the Minnesota and Sask the North Dakota.
Not a bad analogy. How much "Great Plains" is there in Minnesota though?

Though ND's status as "western" is questionable, while MB and SK are firmly in the west. But the Midwest concept makes little sense in Canada.
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  #92  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2016, 2:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Authentic_City View Post
It's weird. US cities are so spread out and usually contain a bunch of cities and towns within a huge metro area, unlike Canadian cities which are mostly just big cities. I find it hard to believe that metro Minneapolis has 3.8 million people while Greater Vancouver has only 2.5 million. Vancouver feels like a bigger city to me. So yeah, Regina feels much more like a big city than Fargo, just like Winnipeg feels much bigger than Des Moines, IA (metro pop. 611,000).
It's a political thing. In Canada we tend more to believe in the greater good of all and give more power to governments to amalgamate cities and allow annexation. In the States it is all about individual liberty and frankly there is a racism and snobbery element. People do not want their cozy enclave gobbled up by the racially and economically "inferior" city and they have the political power and laws that allow them to block it.
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  #93  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2016, 7:04 PM
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I would say that Saskatoon is a small Calgary, while Regina is a small Winnipeg.

To me, Saskatoon and Calgary have an entrepreneurial vibe, while Regina and Winnipeg have a government vibe.
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  #94  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2016, 7:14 PM
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^ Saskatoon always reminded me of Edmonton, at least in a geographical sense. No denying the capital city vibes in Regina and Winnipeg.
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  #95  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2016, 10:56 PM
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Yeah, I totally see the Regina = mini-Winnipeg, Saskatoon = mini-Edmonton thing.
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  #96  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2016, 11:32 PM
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As an Edmontonian the vibe and general mentality of Winnipeg was pretty familiar. There are some obvious differences, but the first time I visited I felt like it I almost immediately understood Winnipeg on a strange level despite some of the more obvious differences.

I see Elements of both Calgary and Edmonton in Saskatoon, but I would still place it a bit closer to Edmonton.

Haven't spent enough time in Regina to really get a good feel for it yet though...

I recently did a road trip to Winnipeg (yes, in February). I definitely noticed some differences between the provinces, but in my experience the most "different" place on the prairies is southern AB (including Calgary to some extent) and a bit of SW Sask.
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  #97  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2016, 7:03 PM
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One other random thing I noticed crossing the prairies based on visibility of restaurants. Alberta and western Sask small towns have a certain archetype of chinese food restaurants. Eastern Sask and Manitoba seem to have a lot more fried chicken. The switch seems to happen somewhere between Moose Jaw and Regina.
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  #98  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2016, 7:15 PM
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^ What brought you to town?

I only did the drive between Edmonton and Winnipeg about four or five times there and back while I was a student at U of A, but that was enough for me... the first time is interesting but after that it just feels boring.
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  #99  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2016, 8:00 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
^ What brought you to town?

I only did the drive between Edmonton and Winnipeg about four or five times there and back while I was a student at U of A, but that was enough for me... the first time is interesting but after that it just feels boring.
Being a former farmer, I am able to keep myself engaged by observing the environment. As in how the crops are doing during the various seasons, whose places along the highway have improved, stayed the same or have been abandoned (it has been sad to see many a stately home or Hip roofed barn fall into ruin), or the conditions of the highway.

The most bored I have ever been was driving highway 6 between Lake Winnipeg and Lake Winnipegosis
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  #100  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2016, 8:10 PM
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^ I can keep myself engaged easily for a 1-2 hour drive, but for a 13 hour drive to Edmonton, you REALLY have to like looking at fields to not get bored.
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