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  #61  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 2:54 AM
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A majority of Manitoba's population lives in Winnipeg and it has a very large Filipino population.
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  #62  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 3:16 AM
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There was a census conducted in Manitoba in 1885 which I had a look at today.

About a third of the population was born in Ontario. In some ways southwestern Manitoba was an extension of southwestern Ontario with its "Clear Grit" politics. Just as SW Ontario was a bastion of support for the United Farmers of Ontario/Progressives, SW Manitoba supported the Liberal-Progressives. In Manitoba, there was never a tradition of "agrarian socialism" or farmer-labor politics like there was in Saskatchewan for the CCF in the 1940s.

In 1885, Manitoba was about 10% French or Metis origin, and one tenth German (8% of the population was Mennonite).

Fewer Americans ever settled in Manitoba as it wasn't part of the "last best west" like Saskatchewan and Alberta were.

Last edited by Docere; Feb 17, 2016 at 3:30 AM.
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  #63  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 3:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
There was a census conducted in Manitoba in 1885 which I had a look at today.

About a third of the population was born in Ontario. In some ways southwestern Manitoba was an extension of southwestern Ontario with its "Clear Grit" politics. Just as SW Ontario was a bastion of support for the United Farmers of Ontario/Progressives, SW Manitoba supported the Liberal-Progressives. In Manitoba, there was never a tradition of "agrarian socialism" or farmer-labor politics like there was in Saskatchewan for the CCF in the 1940s.

In 1885, Manitoba was about 10% French or Metis origin, and one tenth German (8% of the population was Mennonite).

Fewer Americans ever settled in Manitoba as it wasn't part of the "last best west" like Saskatchewan and Alberta were.
Also Manitobas original borders were a lot more east. So what is now Ontario was actually Manitoba. But the Feds gave it to Ontario just like everything else.
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  #64  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 7:15 PM
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A majority of Manitoba's population lives in Winnipeg and it has a very large Filipino population.
The Manitoba Capital Region boasts the largest Filipino population outside of the Philippines.
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  #65  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 7:50 PM
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Originally Posted by W.W. La Chance View Post
The Manitoba Capital Region boasts the largest Filipino population outside of the Philippines.
Except for Toronto, Vancouver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, Dubai and probably at least a couple of dozen other cities...
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  #66  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 8:05 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
Except for Toronto, Vancouver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, Dubai and probably at least a couple of dozen other cities...
Maybe it is in terms of the overall percentage the Filipino population accounts for in the particular area. In that sense I could see MB as being at or near the top.
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  #67  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 8:08 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
Except for Toronto, Vancouver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, Dubai and probably at least a couple of dozen other cities...
My bad. I meant "highest", which I would assume means per capita.

From page 11: http://www.manitobacapitalregion.ca/...n_15_(FIN).pdf
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  #68  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 8:14 PM
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Originally Posted by drew View Post
Maybe it is in terms of the overall percentage the Filipino population accounts for in the particular area. In that sense I could see MB as being at or near the top.
Yeah, we'd do better by that measure but even then there are municipalities in places with large overseas Filipino populations with substantially higher numbers of Filipino citizens... for instance, I understand that Vallejo, CA is roughly one quarter Filipino.

Anyway, my point is that Winnipeg's Filipino population is significant but by no means the largest either by raw numbers or per capita.
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  #69  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 8:23 PM
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Its been a few years since I looked at it but at the time (maybe 5 yrs ago?) on a per capita basis the feds would have had to move 10,000 federal jobs to Sask to make it equivalent on per capita basis. It was explained to me that man and sask are grouped together as the "prairie region" and there was an effort made at spreading federal jobs evenly but only at the "regional" level. Because of Lloyd Axworthy and others, those jobs ended up in Winnipeg. (I'm not knocking Lloyd....I think he was one of the best politicians this country had and Winnipeg was smart enough to keep electing people that would serve prominent roles in Cabinet)

On a per capita basis, Sask had the lowest or near lowest number of federal jobs.
I never realized how big a gap there was Manitoba vs Saskatchewan for Federal Govt jobs.
Manitoba: 29,578
Saskatchewan: 12,882

*Includes Federal General and Federal government business enterprises

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tabl...ovt62e-eng.htm
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  #70  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2016, 8:31 PM
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^ penalty for a lack of Liberal votes when they form government.

Winnipeggers know which side the bread is buttered.

CPC MPs are good for nothing. Liberal MPs bring home the goodies.

Edit: this discrepancy probably really stems from Winnipegs position of a regional centre (in comparison to the smaller cities of Saskatchewan), especially from the turn of the century till about the 1970s. Up till then, Winnipeg was the regional centre for an area even including Alberta.

Last edited by drew; Feb 17, 2016 at 8:43 PM.
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  #71  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2016, 11:14 PM
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this discrepancy probably really stems from Winnipegs position of a regional centre (in comparison to the smaller cities of Saskatchewan), especially from the turn of the century till about the 1970s. Up till then, Winnipeg was the regional centre for an area even including Alberta.
Yup, Winnipeg is really only large pre-war city in the region. Calgary, Edmonton, Regina and Saskatoon are essentially post-war cities.
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  #72  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2016, 6:11 PM
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And continuing on that point, Winnipeg was a truly polyglot city with many immigrants from eastern Europe, notably Ukrainians and Jews in the North End. I believe Winnipeg was about one tenth Ukrainian by the 1930s.

Even today there's a high concentration of Ukrainian origin in the northern suburbs, though Jews in Winnipeg after initially moving to northern suburbs shifted southward as they became more affluent.

In contrast, I'm not sure if the other Prairie cities ever really had urban European ethnic enclaves (or later extensions in the suburbs). While all the Prairie cities have many people of Ukrainian descent today, the vast majority of those in Calgary, Edmonton, Regina and Saskatoon probably trace their origin in the city to second and third generation internal migrants from the rural hinterlands; only Winnipeg would have a large number whose ancestors directly immigrated to the city.
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  #73  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2016, 8:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
And continuing on that point, Winnipeg was a truly polyglot city with many immigrants from eastern Europe, notably Ukrainians and Jews in the North End. I believe Winnipeg was about one tenth Ukrainian by the 1930s.

Even today there's a high concentration of Ukrainian origin in the northern suburbs, though Jews in Winnipeg after initially moving to northern suburbs shifted southward as they became more affluent.

In contrast, I'm not sure if the other Prairie cities ever really had urban European ethnic enclaves (or later extensions in the suburbs). While all the Prairie cities have many people of Ukrainian descent today, the vast majority of those in Calgary, Edmonton, Regina and Saskatoon probably trace their origin in the city to second and third generation internal migrants from the rural hinterlands; only Winnipeg would have a large number whose ancestors directly immigrated to the city.
"Germantown" in Regina was an enclave for Slavic (mostly Ukrainian, but there were other groups as well) and German immigrants. It was much poorer than most other areas of the city and is also home to a number of churches/businesses. Off the top of my head: Ukrainian Catholic and Orthodox churches, Serbian Orthodox, Romanian Orthodox, Ukrainian Co-op, Oskar's German Deli (closed down/taken over by the Ukrainian Co-op). "Chinatown" is now also right in that area... but it was only really ever an area that had a couple Chinese shops concentrated.

But in general, yes, as far as Saskatchewan goes it was the rural areas that had the high concentrations of non-British Isles ethnicities. That said, the highest proportion of Ukrainians were (and somewhat still are) found on a line of settlement that basically runs along the Yellowhead from Winnipeg to Edmonton. Regina and area tended to have heavier German settlement.

I don't know if it is still true, but Saskatchewan for quite a while was the only province where the largest ethnic group wasn't from the 2 "founding nations" (i.e. One of the British Isles countries or French).
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  #74  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2016, 12:34 AM
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Ukrainian population, 1941:

Winnipeg 22,578 10.2%
Edmonton 6,070 6.5%
Saskatoon 2,395 5.7%
Regina 1,531 2.7%
Calgary 959 1%

Winnipeg at the time had about twice the number of Ukrainians as the other four cities combined.

Obviously since then there's been assimilation, more mixed offspring and internal migration, and as a result now all the Prairie cities have a high share of people of Ukrainian descent.

During the postwar years, Edmonton and Toronto came to challenge Winnipeg's position for largest Ukrainian population in Canada. Toronto got a good number of Ukrainian immigrants after WWII, but Edmonton took off likely just because it was located near the heavily Ukrainian rural areas of east-central Alberta.

Does Edmonton have anything resembling a Ukrainian neighborhood?
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  #75  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2016, 12:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Nathan View Post
"Germantown" in Regina was an enclave for Slavic (mostly Ukrainian, but there were other groups as well) and German immigrants. It was much poorer than most other areas of the city and is also home to a number of churches/businesses. Off the top of my head: Ukrainian Catholic and Orthodox churches, Serbian Orthodox, Romanian Orthodox, Ukrainian Co-op, Oskar's German Deli (closed down/taken over by the Ukrainian Co-op). "Chinatown" is now also right in that area... but it was only really ever an area that had a couple Chinese shops concentrated.

But in general, yes, as far as Saskatchewan goes it was the rural areas that had the high concentrations of non-British Isles ethnicities. That said, the highest proportion of Ukrainians were (and somewhat still are) found on a line of settlement that basically runs along the Yellowhead from Winnipeg to Edmonton. Regina and area tended to have heavier German settlement.

I don't know if it is still true, but Saskatchewan for quite a while was the only province where the largest ethnic group wasn't from the 2 "founding nations" (i.e. One of the British Isles countries or French).
Yes Regina's largest ethnic element was German, it was in fact the most "German" city in the country after Kitchener (which retained a German majority until after WWII). Quite a different German population from Kitchener though, as most were ethnic Germans who came from eastern Europe around the turn of the century, rather than descendants of 1850s immigrants from Germany.
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  #76  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2016, 4:22 PM
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But he is getting paid in US funds right?




On another note (and not related to this thread) How long can the Jets (and the rest of the Canadian NHL teams) last with the low Canadian dollar? Wasn't that (and the lack of a modern arena) one of the reasons they left?

Not trolling but wondering.

The biggest reason Jets left and why it wouldn't happen now is there wasn't a salary cap or revenue sharing. A new arena was a huge part of it to. The Jets didn't own the Winnipeg Arena therefore didn't make any money off concessions, other events, etc... and therefore weren't bringing much coin. For that reason no one wanted to buy the team locally.

Low dollar won't affect Canadian teams in the short term. It could hugely affect the NHL in the future as the Canadian teams and just a few American teams make money. If Canadian teams start receiving revenue sharing, you would sooner say bye to teams like Coyotes, Panthers, Hurricanes, etc... as they need every penny they receive from up north currently already.
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  #77  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2016, 4:57 AM
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Manitoba and Saskatchewan have a lot in common to be sure.

We're both not Ontario!

And, we're both definitely in the west! Although, Manitoba is more classically Midwest like Illinois, Missouri or Wisconsin.

Hell, Winnipeg is a near body double for St.Louis having been there many times.

I've never been in a large American city that felt so much like home.

But, perhaps the best comparison is between Minnesota and North Dakota. The later being resource rich and agrarian and the former being more urbanized and eastern looking.

I would argue the Manitoba is the Minnesota and Sask the North Dakota.
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Last edited by Only The Lonely..; Feb 25, 2016 at 5:23 AM.
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  #78  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2016, 5:15 AM
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^ That's actually quite a good analogy.
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  #79  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2016, 3:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Only The Lonely.. View Post
Manitoba and Saskatchewan have a lot in common to be sure.

We're both not Ontario!

And, we're both definitely in the west! Although, Manitoba is more classically Midwest like Illinois, Missouri or Wisconsin.

Hell, Winnipeg is a near body double for St.Louis having been there many times.

I've never been in a large American city that felt so much like home.

But, perhaps the best comparison is between Minnesota and North Dakota. The later being resource rich and agrarian and the former being more urbanized and eastern looking.

I would argue the Manitoba is the Minnesota and Sask the North Dakota.
I don't disagree, but ND does not have any urban centres comparable to Regina and Saskatoon. I guess you could say the same about Minneapolis and Winnipeg. I guess my point is the differences are greater between MN-ND vs. MB-SK.
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  #80  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2016, 3:47 PM
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I don't disagree, but ND does not have any urban centres comparable to Regina and Saskatoon. I guess you could say the same about Minneapolis and Winnipeg. I guess my point is the differences are greater between MN-ND vs. MB-SK.
Maybe not a 100% on the mark analogy when it comes to accurately reflecting the size of urban areas in each (on the flipside, SK is nowhere near the level of energy producer that ND is), but the broad strokes are applicable.
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