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  #21  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2011, 7:48 PM
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U.S. snow spells major flood
Near-record forecasts worsen outlook; Manitoba to brief public Monday
By: Larry Kusch
Posted: 01/19/2011 1:00 AM

The snowbanks are high and the frozen soils are saturated south of the border, spelling potential flood grief for Manitobans this spring.
In its latest flood outlook, the U.S. National Weather Service said Tuesday there is a 20 per cent chance that the Red River at Fargo will surpass the record crest set there in 2009. And at Pembina, N.D., near the Manitoba border, it calculated there was a 70 per cent likelihood of a 2009-like flood.

That year, the crest on the Red at most points in Manitoba was the second-highest since 1852, exceeded only by 1997's Flood of the Century.
Fargo has already received 40 centimetres more snow than it normally gets in an entire winter, and other parts of North Dakota and neighbouring Minnesota that drain into the Red have also received mountains of snow.
Steve Topping, a senior official with Manitoba Water Stewardship, said in a conference call with reporters Tuesday the latest U.S. outlook "definitely confirms" the potential for serious flooding in southern Manitoba.
"I'll admit the flood potential is very high for the Assiniboine and the Red River basins," he said from Fargo, where he is attending, appropriately enough, an international conference on Red River basin flooding.
Topping said the Manitoba government will release its first spring flood forecast of the year at a news conference on Monday, incorporating the new U.S. data.
"We have much more work to do," he said.
Premier Greg Selinger will participate in next week's press conference, a government spokeswoman said Tuesday.
Manitoba officials have been well aware of the potential for significant spring flooding for several months. Soils are saturated from heavy 2010 rains that have caused rivers to swell and freeze at abnormally high levels.
This winter, considerably more snow than normal has fallen on both sides of the border.
Natalie Hasell, a meteorologist with Environment Canada, said Tuesday that Winnipeg has received 95.4 cm of the white stuff to date. The average city snowfall between Oct. 1 and Jan. 31 is 69.3 cm. Brandon has received 103.6 cm of snow so far this winter.

South of the border the situation has been worse. There, the Red River and Devils Lake basins are poised to receive twice their average annual snowfall by winter's end.
The National Weather Service said that the Red is almost certain to surpass the "major" flood stage in Fargo-Moorhead. In December, it calculated those odds at less than 60 per cent.
In addition to higher-than-expected snowfall this winter, U.S. forecasters are now predicting a wet spring for the region.
Topping said Monday's provincial forecast will assess the likelihood of flooding for several Manitoba rivers in addition to the Red. He said his department recently briefed municipal leaders on what the province was expecting as of early January.
"From this point on, Manitoba will mount the appropriate level of effort to fight this flood," the Water Stewardship official vowed.
Earlier this month, the province added a third Amphibex ice-breaking machine to its flood-fighting arsenal at a cost of $1.2 million. It will be used to prevent river ice jams from forming in spring.

-- With files from the Grand Forks Herald
larry.kusch@freepress.mb.ca
The bad news south of the border:

At Pembina, N.D., near the Manitoba border, there's a 70 per cent chance of a flood as severe as the major flood of 2009 and a 20 per cent probability of breaking the record crest set in 1997.

Residents in the Grand Forks area stand a 50 per cent chance of experiencing 2009-like flooding, while in Fargo, there's a 20 per cent chance the Red River will surpass the record crest set two years ago.

Fargo has already had 141.7 centimetres of snow this winter, or 40 cm more than it normally gets in an entire winter. The situation is similar in west-central Minnesota, southeastern North Dakota and portions of northeastern North Dakota.

-- Many of these same areas received 50 per cent more rain than normal last summer and fall, so lakes, rivers and streams south of the border froze at record high seasonal levels.

-- Source: U.S. National Weather Service
Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition January 19, 2011 A3

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/loc...114192399.html
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  #22  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2011, 8:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ajs View Post
brandon has had 103cm's of snow
The writer in the Free Press stated that Russell (among other communities who are actually on a river) was in danger of flooding from the Assiniboine. If Russell is flooded by the Assiniboine then Brandon would be flooded to the #1 Highway to the north and Victoria Ave to the south. In other words it is not going to happen.

I am stating that once again it would be nice if reporters would check some facts before their stories go to print.
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  #23  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 5:17 AM
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Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION
Mayor to Winnipeggers: Don't make spring travel plans
Riverfront homeowners should prepare to sandbag, others to volunteer
By: Bartley Kives
Posted: 01/24/2011 4:05 PM

WINNIPEG - The City of Winnipeg is warning riverfront property owners not to make travel plans this spring, just in case the expected flood winds up being on the severe side of early forecasts.
Approximately 800 Winnipeg property owners should prepare for the possibility of sandbagging their homes and commercial properties this spring, and everyone in the city should expect to be called upon to help out in some form of volunteer effort, Mayor Sam Katz, emergency preparedness officer Randy Hull and water and waste director Barry MacBride told reporters this afternoon.

Earlier this afternoon, the province unveiled an early flood outlook that suggests normal weather conditions could produce a Red River Valley flood on the scale of the 2009 event – and bad weather could produce a 1997-scale flood.
Two hours later, Katz, Hull and MacBride told reporters the City of Winnipeg is preparing for the 1997-like flood situation, just to be safe, as well as the possibility of serious overland flooding and drainage problems during serious rainfall events.
The city is ordering millions of additional sandbag sleeves to go with the 800,000 in stock. Plans are being made to close drainage gates and activate pumps to protect the city’s sewer system from rising river levels.
Plans are also being made to contact property owners who will likely be affected, including those in usual trouble spots such as Kingston Crescent, Scotia Street and Cloutier Drive.
The city is also preparing evacuation centres to deal with people forced to flee river flooding or overland flooding elsewhere in Manitoba. Even if the City of Winnipeg’s defences are successful, it is extremely likely some other region of the province will be flooded out, city officials warned.
The stark warning should be taken as an effort to put Winnipeg property owners on notice and prepare for the spring, the officials said.
There is little property owners can do at this moment, other than ensure their homes are drained properly and install backwater valves and sump pumps. Details about a city-provincial subsidy program for those measures will be announced Tuesday.
Anyone whose property has been threatened by previous floods should make plans to ensure someone is taking care of their homes or businesses this spring, the officials warned.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/loc...114510389.html
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  #24  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 7:13 AM
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Gotta side with Vanriderfan..
Russell is on top of the valley, for it to flood, well that would be Biblical.
Anyone on the valley floor might be in trouble but not that high up.

I travel I-29 weekly and i have to say I'm worried we might approach '97 levels this spring, there is just too much snow in the southern RR valley. With a wet spring we could be looking at some new record levels.
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  #25  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 7:22 AM
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if we hit 97 lvls inside the city then the lake to the south will be bigger two no?
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  #26  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 7:48 AM
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Yes. I'm just scared that i will be forced to drive over to Dunseith,ND (USDA Vet) for 2 months like in '97. The province when doing reconstruction of Hwy 75 should have raised at least one side to a safe level.
Also the bridge at PR 201 crossing the Red should have been done by now but.....
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  #27  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 2:57 PM
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I'm getting too old to sandbag...
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  #28  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 3:45 PM
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Yes. I'm just scared that i will be forced to drive over to Dunseith,ND (USDA Vet) for 2 months like in '97. The province when doing reconstruction of Hwy 75 should have raised at least one side to a safe level.
Also the bridge at PR 201 crossing the Red should have been done by now but.....
This hasn't happened to some degree? I'm sure I noticed a south-bound portion (reconstructed) that was raised higher, than the older north-bound portion, last spring. Albeit, I don't recall if it was a particularly long stretch of highway.
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  #29  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 5:59 PM
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Originally Posted by hexrae View Post
This hasn't happened to some degree? I'm sure I noticed a south-bound portion (reconstructed) that was raised higher, than the older north-bound portion, last spring. Albeit, I don't recall if it was a particularly long stretch of highway.
It's also pretty stupid not to have significantly raised at least one lane of 75 when your touting Winnipeg as an inland terminal. Pretty tough to be a reliable inland port when the main truck route to the US gets shut down for a month or more every 5 years. Centreport your reliable transportation hub (except the months of April and May) for North America!
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  #30  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 6:06 PM
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59 needs to be expanded
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  #31  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 6:28 PM
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This hasn't happened to some degree? I'm sure I noticed a south-bound portion (reconstructed) that was raised higher, than the older north-bound portion, last spring. Albeit, I don't recall if it was a particularly long stretch of highway.

Hwy 75 north of Morris to Ste Agathe was not raised and will flood over if levels are close to 97 levels.'
Hwy 59 should be reconstructed to American border. This would give Trucks another route into the states.
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  #32  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2011, 12:44 AM
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Any new portions of Highway 75 are above flood level. As the road is replaced, the entire highway will eventually come to be over that level.
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  #33  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2011, 2:19 AM
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This includes some Manitoba maps for you Peggers.

http://www.swa.ca/WaterManagement/Do...011Jan15th.pdf
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  #34  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2011, 7:11 PM
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I'm getting really tired of hearing all of the calls from fools in the news and in the Freep to "dredge the river" in order to mitigate flooding!

First, the bottom of the river is rock, not mud. Rock can't be dredged.

Secondly, the depth of the river makes no difference anyway The reason the river floods is because the land here is so flat the river can't get out of it's own way.

Yes, the federal government did cease dredging of the navigable channel some time ago, but that dredging was done in the lake, not the river. This does not affect the river's ability to drain. The actual "mouth" of the river (Netley Marsh) is 15 miles wide.

Sorry, had to vent.
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  #35  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2011, 10:12 PM
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I'm getting really tired of hearing all of the calls from fools in the news and in the Freep to "dredge the river" in order to mitigate flooding!

First, the bottom of the river is rock, not mud. Rock can't be dredged.

Secondly, the depth of the river makes no difference anyway The reason the river floods is because the land here is so flat the river can't get out of it's own way.

Yes, the federal government did cease dredging of the navigable channel some time ago, but that dredging was done in the lake, not the river. This does not affect the river's ability to drain. The actual "mouth" of the river (Netley Marsh) is 15 miles wide.

Sorry, had to vent.
theres spots where they did dredge the silt.... because it would build up in spots and u would have to remove it every so often
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  #36  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2011, 12:23 AM
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theres spots where they did dredge the silt.... because it would build up in spots and u would have to remove it every so often
Where? Please provide an example - other that the Toilet Bowl at the Forks.

I've anchored in hundreds of locations on the Red in the last 25 years. The bottom is all rock, gravel or boulders.
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  #37  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2011, 3:49 AM
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What is the ultimate worst-case scenario potential (like what would, say, a 1000-year flood do?)
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  #38  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2011, 3:58 AM
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What is the ultimate worst-case scenario potential (like what would, say, a 1000-year flood do?)

1826 type flood would destroy most of winnipeg unleas several enviromental disasters.... big ones would be ugly say by by lake winnipeg
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  #39  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2011, 6:33 AM
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LATEST NEWS
Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION
Northern ice jams threat to southern power supply, Hydro says
By: Staff Writer
Posted: 02/4/2011 7:16 PM

Ice jams up north threatened 75 per cent of southern Manitoba’s power supply, Manitoba Hydro says.
"Ten days ago, there was a situation where we had overland flooding," said spokesman Glenn Schneider. "We had crews go to take a look."
The Crown utility is keeping a close eye the hydro towers close to Sipiwesk Lake and swollen parts of the Nelson River about 700 kilometres north of Winnipeg.
Water was around the base of some of the steel towers secured by steel guy wires moored into the ground, Schneider said. Ice had damaged a guy wire holding a tower that carries the high-voltage lines and there was a growing threat that ice would move the towers, he said. The towers were erected in the 1970s and they’ve never had a similar problem.
"We learned about it very early on and got crews out there," Schneider said. Crews repaired the damaged guy wire and are monitoring the situation in the remote area accessible by helicopter.
"Everything appears to be stable at the moment," Schneider said.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/bre...115335149.html
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  #40  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2011, 10:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riverman View Post
I'm getting really tired of hearing all of the calls from fools in the news and in the Freep to "dredge the river" in order to mitigate flooding!

First, the bottom of the river is rock, not mud. Rock can't be dredged.

Secondly, the depth of the river makes no difference anyway The reason the river floods is because the land here is so flat the river can't get out of it's own way.

Yes, the federal government did cease dredging of the navigable channel some time ago, but that dredging was done in the lake, not the river. This does not affect the river's ability to drain. The actual "mouth" of the river (Netley Marsh) is 15 miles wide.

Sorry, had to vent.
This seems to suggest otherwise:

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/loc...116719334.html

Some quotes:

Quote:
Municipalities north of Winnipeg have long lobbied federal and provincial leaders to address the problem of river silting. It's believed the river bottom in some areas has risen by over a metre since dredging was stopped.
Quote:
The municipalities say ice jams would be less of a problem if there was a greater depth of water flowing between the ice and the river bottom. In 2009, when ice jams triggered costly flooding north of Winnipeg, there were spots where the river had frozen solid, they said.
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