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  #281  
Old Posted May 15, 2008, 3:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
AdrianXSands.

Lebbeus Woods is my all time favorite.
It's amazing that you posted all those examples of his work
and no one comments.

To me, they're astonishing.
people've already commented. and with BRILLIANCE too!!! like "that looks like a bug humping a building"
i wish i could say smrt thingz 2
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  #282  
Old Posted May 15, 2008, 4:01 AM
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Originally Posted by (Tim) View Post
Some of these drawings need a lot of help!
yeah! he sux at drawing stuff
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  #283  
Old Posted May 15, 2008, 3:28 PM
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urmas lõoke and salto architects
Multifunctional centre whatchamacall it in Tallinn.
Its a big big plot in the developing harbour area. Previously a pit was dug for a similar sized building (by some finnish architectural bureau). Their design was quite mediocre, so the developer hesitating and pulling out of the project was welcomed by many. In comes Salto and Lõoke, who are doing a bunch of projects in the vicinity.
Photos by jarmo K
the building in the foreground, with those jagged edges is done by Lõoke and Lõoke (father-son) thing. It should be under construction . Feel free to check out homepage (and pdf on that site - http://www.navigator.ee/ ) for some renders, its quite an old project, not groundbreaking, but still quite nice. But that big building in the back, now thats what im talking about. As you can see its really 2 buildings, which are quite different, now if im right, the dark one has more stuff done by Lõoke and the Honeycomb-looking-thingy is more in the lines of Salto.


more (once again shot by Jarmo K):



and a small render, yes. Its right next to water.


this is the "pit", it has piles in it, so basically their piling is complete.
pic once again, by noother then Jarmo K. Those fancy buildings in the back are part of another really awesome project, those particular ones are phase I, by Kosmos (www.kosmoses.ee check!). Phase II getting redesign (one of the sites won by Salto again!). The old clumped limestone building is the "salt storage", now an architecture exhibition space, library, museum. Yes, and Jarmo K works there =)


---------------------------------

some bad news, after an economic downturn (No more 11% GDP growth), our dear goverment pulled out of the promise to fund (partly) the construction of the new arts academy building (see previous pages), so the future of it... is uncertain
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  #284  
Old Posted May 18, 2008, 12:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdrianXSands View Post
people've already commented. and with BRILLIANCE too!!! like "that looks like a bug humping a building"
i wish i could say smrt thingz 2
actually I think it looks more like a prototype AT-AT.
I haz teh smart 2

I've been to Peckham library, it's awesome.
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  #285  
Old Posted May 18, 2008, 6:53 AM
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why?

I've been browsing but haven't come upon a satisfactory answer to a question- why is it that more 'radical' designs don't come to fruition? I don't work in a field that's in any way related to architecture (I'm a casual fan), so i'm not privy to what might pass as conventional wisdom on the topic....my dabblings (& common sense) tell me it's surely based in economics, but isn't there economic incentive to build something even the slightest bit daring? Even looking at Lebbeus Woods' sketches here- I tend to doubt that engineering is a major obstacle....if we can throw up (pun intended) some of Frank Ghery's imaginings, there has to be room, and a public appetite, for others who are similarly inclined (but, you know, better)? I understand there's a fine line and, at least in the U.S., an almost obnoxious imperative to 'maximize' square footage, but hasn't history taught us that art can create value beyond the old real estate adage of "location location location"? This isn't rhetorical- I'm asking....in a nutshell, why isn't more cutting edge design executed? Why do we feel lucky if there are more than a handful decent, soul-feeding projects under construction around the globe? I don't think good design is inaccessible- I live in Chicago, have spent some time in the tourism industry, and have seen people from all walks of life recognize great, good, bad, and ugly architecture (if you live or have ever studied my fair city, you should be able to populate each category!). To couch my point in Chicago examples, I can understand when someone puts out something like Trump or OMP- I'm not a big fan of either, but there's an attempt to do something, to create something....and then you go to river north and take a gander at the utter monstrosities that have sprouted in recent years and I think to myself "self, who, exactly, allowed a handful of illiterate, unimaginative 5th graders to design condo towers?? Seriously, sometimes it seems like horrible design is purposely thrust upon us.
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  #286  
Old Posted May 19, 2008, 4:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducov View Post
actually I think it looks more like a prototype AT-AT.
I haz teh smart 2

I've been to Peckham library, it's awesome.
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  #287  
Old Posted May 19, 2008, 10:23 AM
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HAFENCITY
HAMBURG, DE




////////////////

AM SANDTORKAI




AM SANDTORKAI 68
offices in glass aluminium and terracotta
architect: ingenhoven und partner architekten/düsseldorf



AM SANDTORKAI 66
22 interlocking loft apartments
architect: böge-lindner architekten/hamburg



AM SANDTORKAI 64
a combination of uses and facades
architect: spengler wiescholek architekten/hamburg



AM SANDTORKAI 62
waterfront living in steel and glass
architect: ASP architekten schweger + partner/hamburg



AM SANDTORKAI 60
waterfront offices in steel and glass
architect: BRT architekten bothe richter teherani/hamburg



AM SANDTORKAI 58
waterfront apartments in a cube
architect: marc-olivier mathez/hamburg



AM SANDTORKAI 56
two apartment blocks joined by a translucent center
architect: APB architekten BDA/hamburg



AM SANDTORKAI 54
expansive glass offices
architect: jan störmer partner/hamburg



////////////////

DALMANNKAI QUARTER




DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 9
modern office building
architect: meurer architekten/hamburg



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 10
expansive waterfront loft apartments
architect: LOVE architecture + urbanism ZT GmbH Graz Österreich überNormal-Null/hamburg



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 11
modern living for seniors
architect: böge lindner architekten/hamburg



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 12
modern luxury apartments
architect: NPS tchoban voss/berlin



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 13
customized living environment
architect: BRT bothe richter teherani/hamburg



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 14
luxury apartment tower + offices
architect: ingenhoven architekten gmbh/düsseldorf



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 15
two apartment buildings and offices
architect: marc-olivier mathez/mevius mörker architekten/hamburg



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 16
understated higher-rise office building
architect: david chipperfield architects/london/berlin



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 17
high-profile office building
architect: NPS tschoban voss/hamburg



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 18
42 rental apartments with a courtyard garden
architect: friedrich + partner/hamburg



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 19
condominiums rental apartments offices and retail surrounding a central coutyard
architect: MRLV/spengler wiescholek architekten/winking/hamburg



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 20
a residential building in distinct parts/part 1
architect: carsten lorenzen/copenhagen/kähne birwe nähring krause/loosen rüschoff winkler/hamburg



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 21
a residential building in distinct parts/part 2
architect: SEHW architekten/hamburg/léon wohlhage wernik architekten/berlin



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 22
a residential building in distinct parts/part 3
architect: spine 2 architects/APB architekten BDA/KBNK architekten/hamburg



DALMANNKAI QUARTER: SITE 23
a unique mix of residential office retail and restaurants
architect: schenk und waiblinger architekten/wacker zeiger architekten/hamburg/bieling und bieling architekten/kassel



ELBPHILHARMONIE CONCERT HALL
concert hall atop and within kaispeicher A
architect: herzog + de meuron/basel




////////////////

VARIOUS PROJECTS



UNILEVER/BUILDING 59 + MARCO POLO TOWER/BUILDING 58
office building + residential building
architect: behnisch architekten/stuttgart




AMANGO PURE ENTERTAINMENT GMBH
office building
architect: böge lindner architekten/hamburg



SITE 26: HAMBURG-AMERICA-CENTER
meeting space for americans
architect: richard meier/new york



PROJECT 28
residential building
architect: KBNK/iris neitmann architektin/schenk waiblinger/hamburg/astoc architects + planners/köln



KÜHNE + NAGEL GERMAN HEAD OFFICE
office building
architect: jan störmer partner/hamburg



SAP OFFICES
office building
architect: spengler wiescholek architekten/hamburg


ÜBERSEEQUARTIER/BUILDINGS 1 2 + 3
offices residential retail + restaurants
architect: trojan + trojan/darmstadt/dietz-joppien/frankfurt




ÜBERSEEQUARTIER/BUILDING 4
offices retail + restaurants
architect: nps tchoban voss GbR/berlin



ÜBERSEEQUARTIER/BUILDING 5
offices retail + restaurants
architect: bolles + wilson/münster



ÜBERSEEQUARTIER/BUILDING 6
offices retail + restaurants
architect: EEA/rotterdam



ÜBERSEEQUARTIER/BUILDING 13
offices retail + restaurants
architect: EEA/rotterdam



ÜBERSEEQUARTIER/BUILDING 7
offices retail + restaurants
architect: böge lindner architekten/hamburg



ÜBERSEEQUARTIER/BUILDING 9
offices retail + restaurants
architect: BDP/london



ÜBERSEEQUARTIER/BUILDING 10 + 11
offices retail + restaurants
architect: KSP engel und zimmermann/frankfurt/ortner + ortner/düesseldorf




ÜBERSEEQUARTIER/CRUISE CENTER + HOTEL
hotel
architect: massimiliano fuksas/rome



BROOKTORKAI/BUILDINGS 35 + 36
offices + restaurant
architect: gmp architekten/hamburg



BROOKTORKAI/BUILDINGS 37
offices
architect: jan störmer partner/hamburg



BROOKTORKAI/SPIEGEL
offices
architect: henning larsen architects/copenhagen



HAFENCITY UNIVERSITY
university
architect: code unique architekten/dresden



PROJECT 46
offices
architect: prof. bernhard winking architekten BDA/hamburg



INITIAL CHICAGO SQUARE PROPOSAL
mixed uses
architect: studio gang/chicago







SCIENCE CENTER
museum
architect: OMA/REM KOOLHAAS/new york










and this is only so far... more to come in the years to come...
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  #288  
Old Posted May 19, 2008, 10:35 AM
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SNU MUSEUM OF ART_SOUTH KOREA_SEOUL_2005
OMA/REM KOOLHAAS_NEW YORK

The Seoul National University Museum is situated near the university's main entrance. The building itself, a rectangular box so to speak, hovers over a concrete core. The box is sliced at an angle creating a sloping floor for the auditoriums. The ground plane beneath is kept completely free allowing for maximum interaction between the students and the building.

The design for the Seoul National University Museum is driven by the relationship of the campus to the community and serve as a link between them. This linkage is the defining operation behind the project's morphology. The operation is a slice through the maximum building envelope and establishes a pedestrian connection between the community and the campus. The hovering mass generated by this slice is modulated by the circulation path and site topography. This mass is a cantilevered structural steel shell bearing on concrete core.

Circulation through the building is a continuation of the defining slice, internally the path bifurcate and spirals inward. As one enters the building the circulation affords connections to the different programs. There are four basic program areas: Exhibition, Educational, Library and Operations. The educational spaces, the lecture hall and auditorium, benefit from the slope formed by the slice and internally accommodate ramped seating. The library inhabits the center and structural core of the building. Peripheral and central circulation paths create two spiraling loops, which allow program contiguity in the building. The exhibition space being the primary space in envelope is located at the top.

The exhibition level is designed for expansion by allowing its invasion of the educational spaces. This invasion and resultant multi use of the educational spaces for exhibition purposes are articulated by a ramped circulation path and in materiality.

The building is further defined by a selection of finishes and materials, which articulate its compositional elements and functional requirements. The monolithic volume is strategically punctuated towards specific site views, consequently exposing moments of its structural framework.






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  #289  
Old Posted May 19, 2008, 11:08 AM
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PSFS_1932_philadelphia
william lescaze






canine devotion_flickr

jeklee_flickr
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  #290  
Old Posted May 19, 2008, 11:26 AM
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M. H. de young museum
san francisco
2005

herzog de meuron


The design of the de Young began with a concept of the museum as a number of distinct, linked pavilions, each reflecting an element of the disparate collections that make up the museum. That initial diagram became increasingly condensed as the design process went on.

As built, the pattern of scattered pavilions has been pushed and pressured into a tighter, denser configuration. The spaces between pavilions are now internal atriums, linked by dynamic pathways that sweep through the complex. They squeeze together, creating courtyards, like pockets of trapped air. Filled with landscaped gardens, they look from within the museum like glass vitrines full of vegetation.

This organic reading of the museum’s architecture is confirmed by its skin, a tailored overcoat of patinated copper, put together with the care of a haute couture dressmaker. Some sheets are perforated, some dimpled, and some photographically etched with dots that evoke the quality of dappled sunshine percolating through the leaves and foliage of the park. It’s an apt metaphor; it is also ravishingly beautiful.








wiki_slowpainting_flyingcompass.com_enkebollfoundation

Last edited by Tom Servo; May 19, 2008 at 12:23 PM.
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  #291  
Old Posted May 19, 2008, 12:24 PM
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Great finds, AdrianX. If you like Hafencity you should check out Örestad in Copenhagen as well.



I know I have posted this one before, but some new larger renderings have been released;



Hyllie Hotel / "Killer Slug" [Wingårdh Arkitekter]
Malmö, Sweden


This hotel, already nicknamed the "killer slug" by the locals because of its shape, will be located in Malmö's booming Hyllie area, between the city and the bridge that connects Malmö to the Danish capital of Copenhagen.











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  #292  
Old Posted May 19, 2008, 12:54 PM
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I love the base of the PSFS building and the left side of the main tower, the bulk of the tower I'm not so sure about, but at least it's in a defined architectural style, not like some of the new buildings I've seen in this thread which are just a jumble of weird and are trying to be more artsy and less building. Which is why I don't Like that Killer Slug hotel, it looks like it's been designed to be more of a giant sculpture and less for the people who will be inhabiting the building.
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  #293  
Old Posted May 20, 2008, 4:34 AM
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Adrian, we need a Chicago version of Hafencity for Franklin Point, stat!
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  #294  
Old Posted May 20, 2008, 5:30 AM
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no way, what needs to be at franklin point is a 1,000er MINIMUM! otherwise it'd be a wasted and failed opportunity to build something truly great and that would add height to the skyline... we need to have our priorities straight when developing land in the city.
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  #295  
Old Posted May 20, 2008, 5:44 AM
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Ha, I was expecting you would say that (I also agree). I guess I should have expanded my statement a little; "the Chicago version of Hafencity" was meant to imply more height with the same caliber of design. I would take a nice array of awesome looking mid-rises than 1,000 footers of shit design any day, though. It is, however, a prime spot, without question.
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  #296  
Old Posted May 20, 2008, 7:44 AM
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Ha, I was expecting you would say that (I also agree). I guess I should have expanded my statement a little; "the Chicago version of Hafencity" was meant to imply more height with the same caliber of design. I would take a nice array of awesome looking mid-rises than 1,000 footers of shit design any day, though. It is, however, a prime spot, without question.
dude... i was being extremely sarcastic.

i'd love to see franklin point filled a bunch of this

but in typical fashion i expect to see a bunch of this


the word 'world-class' is something greatly misunderstood in this city as it applies to architecture.
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  #297  
Old Posted May 20, 2008, 8:32 AM
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museum plaza_louisville
REM KOOLHAAS/OMA




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  #298  
Old Posted May 20, 2008, 8:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdrianXSands View Post
dude... i was being extremely sarcastic.

i'd love to see franklin point filled a bunch of this

but in typical fashion i expect to see a bunch of this


the word 'world-class' is something greatly misunderstood in this city as it applies to architecture.
Sadly, that it what I expect to see as well. I really don't know your general sentiments regarding height in this city, so I definitely was not able to discern any sarcasm. However, I still think a lot of height would be in order for that site, but I would surely be happy with a Hafencity-style development for that site of the same scale as the original.

As for Museum Plaza, a welcome addition to this thread. I was expecting you would add it at some point. Fucking amazing structure, yet very disheartening to hear most people's opinions of it.
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  #299  
Old Posted May 21, 2008, 2:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdrianXSands View Post
people've already commented. and with BRILLIANCE too!!! like "that looks like a bug humping a building"
i wish i could say smrt thingz 2
hey that was me! Adrian I like the way you think outside the box about architecture, and I admit you do make me stop and think about buildings more than I have before. I still think you're a crazy fucker, but you have your opinions and I respect that. Although I think your dream of Chicago becoming a city full of low rise, ultra modern boxes will not happen.

On another note let me add a few pictures of Spertus Institute I took over the weekend. That building is incredibly unique, especially for its location. The funny thing is most Chicagoans dont even know its there. Unless they happen to walk or drive by it.


*see below

Last edited by cbotnyse; May 21, 2008 at 2:59 AM.
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  #300  
Old Posted May 21, 2008, 2:56 AM
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krueck + sexton
SPERTUS INSTITUTE OF JEWISH STUDIES
CHICAGO_2007


The Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies selected Krueck & Sexton to design a signature architectural statement about the nature of Jewish culture and learning.

The new facility for Spertus is a mixed-use program containing exhibition galleries, library, 400-seat multi-use auditorium, college classrooms and administrative offices. It expresses the values of openness, transparency and hospitality. An unabashedly contemporary design, Spertus is set in a 19th Century streetscape of masonry buildings designed by historic names such as Burnham, Sullivan, and Holabird & Roche.

Fundamental to Jewish religious and intellectual traditions is the role of light. The facade is composed of folded glass planes and will glow with light, both natural and man-made, revealing the inner dynamic and energy of the multi-disciplinary programs of this eighty-year old institution

Through a variety of measures, including high performance lighting and demand base ventilation, the building achieves a 29% reduction in energy consumption, resulting in over 300 tons of avoided CO2 per year. Water-saving fixtures are used throughout. The quality of the building's indoor air is ensured by the use of healthy materials, high-efficiency air filtration, and special humidity controls, providing for the well-being of staff, students, and visitors, as well as the long-term preservation of the Institute's archival treasures.

Modulating the scale of the building, the glass folds relate the Spertus facade to the numerous bays, windows, cornices and other projections found on the magnificent Michigan Avenue street wall. Spertus will join only a handful of public buildings on the Avenue. In this important role, the open character of the facade will welcome visitor to explore the many treasures within.






cbotnyse







k+s
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