HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture

About The Ads  This week the ad company used in the forum will be monitoring activity and doing some tests to identify any problems which users may be experiencing. If at any time this week you get pop-ups, redirects, etc. as a result of ads please let us know by sending an email to forum@skyscraperpage.com or post in the ads complaint thread. Thank you for your participation.


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2007, 1:38 PM
DanJ's Avatar
DanJ DanJ is offline
Hazza!
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 34
Bank of America Tower Seeks Platinum Certification

The Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park in New York City.

Upon completion in 2008, The Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park will be the country's greenest high-rise building, demonstrating the state of the art in energy efficiency, indoor air quality, sustainable materials, and environmentally-conscious construction, operations, and maintenance procedures. Designed by Cook + Fox Architects, LLP, the 55-story, 2.2 million sq. ft. tower is the first to strive for the Platinum LEED designation.

Like The New York Times Building, this project was developed as part corporate headquarters, part speculative office space. Initiated by The Durst Organization, which in 1996 built New York's first green tower, 4 Times Square, the building has become a joint venture with the Bank of America, anchoring its New York City operations, including global corporate and investment banking, wealth and investment management, and consumer and commercial banking businesses. Initially planning to occupy 1.1 million sq. ft., the bank recently expanded to take another 500,000 sq. ft., or more than three-quarters of the building. The remaining space will be leased by The Durst Organization to other tenants.

Highlights of the building's many green features include the following. An air filtration system removes 95% of particulates, as well as ozone and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Air vented back to the city will be cleaner than the intake, making the skyscraper effectively a giant air filter. In the interior environment, the office tower employs filtered under-floor displacement air ventilation for the comfort and control of individual workers and carbon dioxide monitors that automatically introduce more fresh air when necessary.

Emphasizing transparency, the design uses low-emissivity insulating glass in floor-to-ceiling windows that permit maximum daylight and optimum views. An advanced double-wall system in portions of the facade further conserves energy. Perimeter daylight dimming and LED lights reduce electric usage.


Cook+Fox Architects LLP
Rendering republished by businessweek online
http://images.businessweek.com/ss/06...s/source/3.htm

A 5.1-megawatt cogeneration plant will supply 70% of the building's energy with a clean natural-gas burning power plant. For climate control, it will rely on a ground- water heat exchanger that is the first of its type and will make ice with excess thermal energy from the power plant, supplementing the air conditioning system and reducing the peak demand loads on the city's electrical grid.

The building will save 10.3 million gallons of water annually through such devices as waterless urinals and low-flow fixtures. A gray water system will capture, store, and re-use 100% of rainwater and recycle waste water and planted roofs, reducing the urban heat island effect. Bottom line, the Bank of America Tower will reduce energy consumption by 50%, potable water consumption by 50%, and create net zero carbon dioxide emissions.


.............................
Cook+Fox Architects LLP.........................................................Cook+Fox Architects LLP
Rendering republished by Site Selection Online………....................Rendering republished by Popular Science Online
http://www.siteselection.com/ssinsid.../sf040816a.jpg.................http://www.popsci.com/popsci/bown200...ing/index.html


__________________
“Learning and innovation go hand in hand. The arrogance of success is to think that what you did yesterday will be sufficient for tomorrow.”

Last edited by DanJ; Aug 8, 2007 at 5:58 PM. Reason: added image documentation
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2007, 5:51 PM
HomeInMyShoes's Avatar
HomeInMyShoes HomeInMyShoes is online now
arf
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Pile 'O Bones
Posts: 12,097
Awesome stuff.

"carbon dioxide monitors that automatically introduce more fresh air when necessary"

Damn, no more falling asleep in board meetings and blaming it on the poor oxygen concentration in the building.
__________________

-- “We heal each other with kindness, gentleness and respect.” -- Richard Wagamese
-- “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It's not.” -- Dr. Seuss
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2007, 7:26 PM
thebestdillweed thebestdillweed is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 23
why isnt their a dedicated construction thread for this building?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2007, 8:18 PM
HomeInMyShoes's Avatar
HomeInMyShoes HomeInMyShoes is online now
arf
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Pile 'O Bones
Posts: 12,097
There is, but for people interested in green architecture, the regular thread would just bury the discussion of the green aspects. Then again, based on the traffic in this subforum this is bound to spark almost no discussion.

Here's the regular thread: clicky clicky here here
__________________

-- “We heal each other with kindness, gentleness and respect.” -- Richard Wagamese
-- “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It's not.” -- Dr. Seuss
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2007, 2:55 AM
thebestdillweed thebestdillweed is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 23
thanks!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2007, 2:04 AM
natelox's Avatar
natelox natelox is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 343
Wow, those are thick floors! The suspended ceiling and access flooring are redundant. I know underfloor is more efficient for HVAC, but all (or apparently most) projects are all about economics. Remove that access flooring and the developer could get another floor in.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2007, 2:25 AM
Matty's Avatar
Matty Matty is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 3,303
It's not worth it. If the point of the building is to be green/LEED certified, and you want a certain amount of space, you build a certain number of floors.
__________________
He's Meatty, He's Matty, He's KEWL.

He has a Flickr!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/40336730@N08/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2007, 3:57 AM
natelox's Avatar
natelox natelox is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 343
A developer will build a building to make money, not to make it green. Some developers perceive sustainability as a marketing tool which will help attract buyers. That 'certain amount of space' you mentioned is generally based on zoning regulations. A developer will milk the property for all it's worth.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2007, 4:19 AM
mthd mthd is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by natelox View Post
Wow, those are thick floors! The suspended ceiling and access flooring are redundant. I know underfloor is more efficient for HVAC, but all (or apparently most) projects are all about economics. Remove that access flooring and the developer could get another floor in.
it's not as big a difference as you might think. in this case i assume they're using the ceiling plenum for return air and the access floor for supply air. if the ceiling had supply air as well it would be even deeper than shown. judging from the renderings (which is one of the nicest i've seen to illustrate this subject!) there is 4" at most more in the floor/ceiling sandwich than a traditional office building.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 7:35 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.