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  #281  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2018, 3:35 PM
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Originally Posted by wags_in_the_peg View Post
i'm confused, IG changing their name?
Yup, Instagram's new investing arm.

https://twitter.com/IGWealthMgmt/sta...28057360596993
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  #282  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2018, 5:04 PM
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the logo looks like it'll fit nicely on their building at least! when they show the one logo fading into the other on that link, it really does make the old one look outdated...
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  #283  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2018, 6:08 PM
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Flurry of activity happening down there
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  #284  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2018, 6:39 PM
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The city should study/track extended lane closures as a result of construction, and if it’s determined (as it likely often will be) that there’s no real consequences of it, look at road diets to expand sidewalks, add bike lanes, etc. This would be a good place – no need for 4 lanes there. St. Mary should have a protected bike lane from Main to Portage & connecting into U of W.
I drive through that intersection every day at all times and there's almost no effect except for people being unfamiliar with how that street and intersection work. (which would be remedied when construction completed obviously with new signage) I do find York/St Mary near Memorial there a bit confusing - more eastbound than westbound - took me a few times to figure it out so can't blame other people for being confused.

Worst issues have seen - someone moved the traffic pylon/barricade on St Mary WB before Memorial- so the 2nd 'straight' lane wasn't closed so a couple cars got stuck at construction barricades and almost caused an accident trying to merge.

Also a poor truck driver got in a long drawn out reverse session (trying to get into construction site) that lead to St Mary AND Memorial being blocked off - fortunately was a slow Saturday morning. The guys trying to close traffic and direct him weren't doing any favours.

Am convinced it could be shut down to 3 lanes at least before it becomes 2 ways (its 4 lanes right now with 2 left most lanes literally being used most often for parking and the RARE person getting onto York. you only need one lane to get back onto York (2 right now and one is almost always for parking and otherwise not used) and I'd say keep 2 for West bound and use the extra space for bike lanes that could wind there way around to Colony or another street that could be closed converted to a active transit/walking corridor straight to University.

TL;DR - i hope they cut at least one of those lanes. I drive through here all the time and there's almost no difference even at rush hour.
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  #285  
Old Posted Sep 29, 2018, 10:19 PM
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Mural brings northern inspiration to Inuit Art Centre construction site

Winnipeg centre will be the largest single gallery space in the world devoted to Inuit art, culture, history
CBC News · Posted: Sep 21, 2018

The Winnipeg Art Gallery's Inuit Art Centre isn't set to open until 2020 but there is already some artwork on display in downtown Winnipeg.

A mural by Winnipeg-based Inuit artist Kailey Sheppard was unveiled Friday on the covered pedestrian walkway adjacent to the construction site at the corner of Memorial Boulevard and St. Mary Avenue.

"They actually created this project specifically for me and that was very exciting because I've never done anything like this before, especially on this scale," said Sheppard.

"It's crazy. It's surreal," she said about her work being on display along such a busy street in the city.

The mural, painted on sheets of plywood, features northern sea creatures on colourful, serpentine waves which also echo the northern lights.

The work will be up for the next 1½ years, during construction of the $65-million centre.

The 40,000-square-foot, four-storey building will be connected to the main Winnipeg Art Gallery by bridges on all levels. It will be the largest single gallery space in the world devoted to Inuit art, culture and history, according to the WAG.

"Hopefully it will inspire a little bit of thinking about the North," Darlene Coward Wight, the WAG's curator of Inuit art, said about Sheppard's mural.

She said Sheppard approached the WAG a while back, introducing herself and looking for any opportunities to work with the gallery or the future Inuit Art Centre.

hen the walkway was going up, the idea for the mural just seemed right, said Coward Wight.

"She's never had her artwork out there at all. She's self-taught, totally unknown, and it just seemed like a really good mentoring situation," she said. "She's so talented. She just has natural talent.

"And we don't have a lot of Inuit artists living in Winnipeg so it's really exciting when you find someone."

Sheppard was also mentored during the creation of her piece by Graffiti Art Programming and Synonym Art Consultation as part of the 2018 Wall-to-Wall mural and culture festival.

Kailey Sheppard poses in front of her mural, which will remain on display for about a year and a half during construction of the Inuit Art Centre. (Gary Solilak/CBC)


The mural, painted on sheets of plywood, features northern sea creatures on colourful, serpentine waves which also echo the northern lights. (Gary Solilak/CBC)

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manit...ural-1.4833185
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  #286  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2018, 7:36 PM
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Quote:
Philanthropist 'astounded by the beauty' of WAG's collection makes $1M donation to Inuit Art Centre

Visit to gallery inspired Louise Leatherdale and late husband Doug to help fund centre
Shane Gibson · CBC News · Posted: Oct 05, 2018


Louise Leatherdale speaks at the Winnipeg Art Gallery Friday after donating $1 million toward the gallery's Inuit Art Centre. (Shane Gibson/CBC)

After seeing the collection of Inuit art stored in the Winnipeg Art Gallery's basement, Louise Leatherdale and her late husband Doug knew they wanted to help get the pieces in front of the public.

Leatherdale was at the WAG Friday to announce a $1-million donation toward the gallery's $65-million Inuit Art Centre, slated to open in 2020.

"We were astounded by the beauty of it," said Leatherdale of the gallery's collection. "The more we talked the more we realized that we wanted to be committed to this project.

"It's important to Winnipeg, it's important for the nation and it's important for all of us internationally."

Leatherdale says she and her husband, a Morden, Man.-born businessman who died in 2015, first fell in love with Inuit art after chancing upon a few pieces at a Toronto art gallery 30 years ago.

The couple acquired around 25 pieces of Inuit art in a personal collection that Leatherdale said Friday she plans to donate to the WAG's 40,000-square-foot, four-storey Inuit Art Centre, currently under construction at the south side of the downtown gallery.

"Doug and I decided a long time ago if the Winnipeg Art Gallery would like them, we would certainly want them to have them here," she said.

"They get to come home."

The WAG says the Inuit Art Centre will be the largest single gallery space in the world devoted to Inuit art, culture and history, and will house the gallery's massive collection of Inuit art, which includes more than 13,000 pieces.

The centre will include exhibition spaces, a glass-enclosed visible art vault, a conservation facility, art studios, a two-level interactive theatre and classrooms.

The Leatherdales' donation will be used to create the Doug and Louise Leatherdale Gallery, a space the WAG says will complement exhibitions by exploring themes in more depth and offer alternative perspectives to the art.

"It offers artists — be they senior, be they emerging, be they established — it gives them a new exhibition space that did not exist before," said WAG director and CEO Stephen Borys.

"It will help us connect through the power of art."
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manit...852359?cmp=rss
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  #287  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2018, 7:01 PM
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Fantastic.
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  #288  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2018, 6:58 PM
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Granite Concrete Services (@graniteconcrete) on Instagram: “Our pump @ the Winnipeg Art Gallery


Garett Natrasany (@garett_n) on Instagram
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  #289  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2018, 3:31 AM
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Sputnik Architecture Inc. (@sputnikarchitecture) on Instagram: “WAG going up!


True North Life (@ltruenorth) on Instagram
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  #290  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2018, 5:17 AM
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Last edited by Wpg_Guy; Dec 18, 2018 at 5:33 AM.
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  #291  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2018, 7:09 AM
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AUGUST 21


OCTOBER 9


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DECEMBER 6


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DECEMBER 19

DECEMBER 20


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  #292  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2018, 3:25 PM
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^ Nice pics. So what is that cylindrical structure anyway? It kind of looks like a smokestack.
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  #293  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2019, 1:16 AM
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If you look at the renderings, it's kind of designed where the building is almost raised on stilts and floating above the main floor, which is kind of like an atrium. Appears that is one of the several columns/structures that will support it somehow?
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  #294  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2019, 3:39 PM
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^ Nice pics. So what is that cylindrical structure anyway? It kind of looks like a smokestack.
It's a stairwell. there will be another one on the other side.
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  #295  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2019, 5:52 AM
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Quote:
Building a legacy: Construction of the Inuit Art Centre
By: Mike Deal
Posted: 01/16/2019 7:19 PM

On Wednesday, Free Press photographer Mike Deal captured the construction progress to date on the Winnipeg Art Gallery’s ambitious Inuit Art Centre.

Construction on the complex, located directly south of the existing art gallery, began last May. When completed, the $65-million complex will house the largest public collection of contemporary Inuit art in the world.

The four-storey, 40,000-square-foot centre, which was designed by Michael Maltzan Architecture to evoke the northern landscape, will connect to the main gallery by bridges on all levels. It will feature exhibition spaces, a glass enclosed visible art vault, a conservation facility, art studios and interactive theatre.

The centre is scheduled to be completed in 2020, in time for the province’s 150th birthday.






















https://www.winnipegfreepress.com/fe...504460221.html
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  #296  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2019, 10:50 PM
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  #297  
Old Posted Mar 17, 2019, 4:50 PM
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'This is a game-changing museum': Winnipeg Art Gallery expansion promises to vault Inuit art to new heights

The WAG's $65M Inuit Art Centre will bring new stories to the forefront, say artists, curators

Bryce Hoye · CBC News · Posted: Mar 17, 2019 6:00 AM CT

Darlene Coward Wight holds up one of 7,500 sculptures in the WAG Inuit art vault. (Bryce Hoye/CBC)

Beneath the Winnipeg Art Gallery, Darlene Coward Wight unlocks and enters an underground vault full of treasures of the North that are destined to rise and take over the busy downtown street corner next year.

Above ground, bundled-up construction workers pour cement over lattices of rebar as two giant cranes extend into the sky, building the new Inuit Art Centre that will be home to some of the art currently hidden from public view in the vault.

PHOTOSInuit Art Centre to reveal beauty of the North in the south
Wight, the WAG's long-time curator of Inuit art, spends a lot of her time in the windowless basement Inuit art vault tending to 7,500 stone, bone, antler and ivory carvings from across the Arctic that line tall shelves.

"The big thrill of being a curator is that I get to touch stuff all the time and thoroughly enjoy it," she said after slipping on a pair of white handling gloves.

"Whalebone things, for example: you look at it, you think, 'Wow, that must be heavy.' And then you pick it up and it's light as a feather, because it's so porous and it's been in the ground for 200 years."


The Inuit Art Centre is under construction at the corner of St. Mary Avenue and Memorial Boulevard. It's projected to be finished in spring 2020. (Bryce Hoye/CBC)

That sense of texture is one thing that distinguishes a lot of Inuit art from the rest, and it won't be long before members of the public get a feel for some of the WAG's vast collection of nearly 14,000 pieces.

When complete, the gallery says the new centre will be home to a collection of contemporary Inuit art unlike any other in the world — and will bring new stories to the forefront.

"This is a game-changing museum," said WAG CEO and director Stephen Borys.

Construction begins on Winnipeg Art Gallery's Inuit Art Centre
Philanthropist 'astounded by the beauty' of WAG's collection makes $1M donation to Inuit Art Centre
Construction on the forthcoming $65-million Inuit Art Gallery is projected to finish in spring 2020, with the gallery opening to visitors that summer. Shovels hit the ground in May of last year, but only about $56 million in funding has been secured.

See the WAG's Inuit Art Centre promotional video:
Video Link

Three levels of government have committed $35 million — $15 million each from the federal and provincial governments, and $5 million from the City of Winnipeg. Of the remaining $30 million needed, public and private partners have helped cover almost $21 million so far.

"This final year of the campaign is a critical year," said Borys.

"We're going to reach our goal, but it is important as the building goes up that not everyone thinks all the money is there."

Design inspired by land
Michael Maltzan Architecture's design for the gallery is inspired by northern landscapes.

Once done, passersby will see a building exterior that looks like a white wave of tundra snow undulating out toward at the corner of Memorial Boulevard and St. Mary Avenue.


The $65-million centre will house the largest collection of Inuit art in the world. (Michael Maltzan Architecture/Winnipeg Art Gallery)
The 40,000-square-foot centre, which will be connected to the WAG's existing space next door, will allow visitors to explore four levels, starting in the 5,000-square-foot glass atrium.

There, a three-storey-high glass vault will display the carvings that will be viewable from all sides, and visitors will be able to watch curators and museum staff work with the pieces.

The second level will include a 90-seat theatre capable of showcasing films and presentations from elders, performers and storytellers, but it will also have an interactive component.


A rendering of the visible vault of the Winnipeg Art Gallery's Inuit Art Centre. (Michael Maltzan Architecture/Winnipeg Art Gallery)

"We'll be able to connect a classroom in Winnipeg to a classroom in Rankin [Inlet] or Iqaluit," said Borys, overlooking the construction site from the WAG penthouse.

"We'll be able to kind of transport an elder carver right here for the kids to see."

That floor will also have a carving area, library and learning commons that will serve as an international education, development and research hub for curatorial internships and arts workers.

The third-floor will boast an 8,000-square-foot, 30-foot-high exhibition space for the largest Indigenous gallery in North America, Borys said.

Five indoor and two outdoor studios where students of all ages will learn about northern Indigenous culture will be located on the fourth floor.

Borys said the Inuit Art Centre will reflect the spirit of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission calls to action and help people understand the legacy of colonialism in the North.

"How do we tell that story? We tell it through the people who experienced that," said Borys.

For Inuk artists, that means reflecting on the legacy of the residential school system, forced relocation and more, he says.

"They're also documenting climate change," said Borys.

"They talk about the impact of mines and major developments going on. They talk about the shipping industry, tourism industry. They talk about it through their art."

Beginning of 'amazing phenomena'
The contemporary era of Inuit art began about 70 years ago.

Traditional nomadic living and subsistence hunting practices were changing amid the ongoing pressures of colonization. More and more Inuit people were forced to settle in permanent communities, losing their language and parts of their cultural heritage in the process. Many were confronted with a new reality.

"There was really nothing to do to make money," said Wight. "Arts and crafts just filled that gap in just such an amazing way."


Carvings currently in the WAG's Inuit art vault. The new art centre will let the gallery bring pieces like this to the public. (Bryce Hoye/CBC)
Carvings of shamans, mythical creatures, polar bears, seals, muskox, caribou, walruses and other northern wildlife dominated much of the era.

It was a successful Inuit exhibit in Montreal in 1949 that really thrust the art into the spotlight around the world, said Wight.

"It was really the beginning of an amazing phenomenon," Wight said. "The media and collectors just went crazy over these stone pieces."

Inuit art curator wants to bring traditional art back to Nunavut
National collection enriched by close to 1,000 works of Inuit art
Living in harmony with the land remains a common theme, though the body of Inuit artwork continues to expand beyond carvings. About 6,000 prints, drawings, ceramics, textiles and dolls will also be displayed when the centre opens.

Increasingly northern artists are also experimenting with film, writing, sound, photography, performance and a variety of mediums to reflect how life in the North has changed.


Hand-crafted dolls sport clothing made of caribou skin and fur. (Gary Solilak/CBC)
"There are a number of artists that are really interested in showing not just the romantic side of living in the Arctic but some of the darker sides, some of the social problems like suicide, substance abuse," said Wight.

"You're still seeing the traditional stories being told, but they're being told in very modern ways."

All-Inuit team of curators
Four Inuk guest curators will put on the Inuit Art Centre's inaugural exhibit, titled INUA, that will explore the future of Inuit art.

The lead guest curator is Heather Igloliorte, co-chair of the WAG's Indigenous advisory circle, and an associate professor at Concordia University who holds the school's research chair in Indigenous art history and community engagement.

Winnipeg Art Gallery names 4 curators for Inuit Art Centre's 1st exhibitions
Emerging curators and artists Kablusiak (also known as Jade Nasogaluak Carpenter), Krista Ulujuk Zawadski and Asinnajaq round out the group.

In what the WAG calls a first for any exhibit, each of the curators is from one of the four different regions of the Canadian Arctic.

"In lots of things that we consume, we're looking for little pieces of truth of the world, and I think that it's really honest to have more than one curator," said Asinnajaq.

"It means more than one perspective, taking in more than one view of the world."

She produced the 2017 short film Three Thousand, which chronicles how quickly Western institutions and value systems rendered traditional life in the North almost unrecognizable.


But there's a challenge in the new art centre too, she says. Winnipeg isn't the home territory of the art that will fill the centre, which will require both the gallery and Inuk artists to work to ensure they're maintaining relationships with each other over time.

'Towards that path of reconciliation'
Igloliorte is excited about the leadership opportunities the Inuit Art Centre will provide to a new generation of Inuit curators so they have more of a say in the interpretation of that work.

She said museums have long been complicit in colonization, from displaying human remains to questions over theft of cultural objects.

"There have also been long histories of many diverse voices not getting the opportunity to be represented in institutions that collect mostly European art, mostly historical art, mostly white male work from Europe," she said.


The head of a muskox figurine made of bone peeks out from one of the many tall shelves in the vault that contains 7,500 pieces of art. (Bryce Hoye/CBC)

She's confident the Inuit Art Centre will be a step in the right direction.

"In Canada, especially in the post-TRC world that we are in, we have an obligation to do better, and to be more representative and to be more welcoming," she said.

"If the Winnipeg Art Gallery has the world's largest collection of Inuit art, then the Inuit Art Center goes a long way towards that path of reconciliation."

It's no secret the art world runs on trends, and Asinnajaq said she feels there is a revived interest in Inuit art right now.

"It always feels like there's a clock ticking, and you wonder, 'When will we go out of trend again?'" she asked.

"But knowing that we're going to have this centre means we know we'll have somewhere as long as that building is standing to share and showcase our voice."
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manit...leru-1.5055433
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  #298  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2019, 6:27 PM
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  #299  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2019, 2:23 AM
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Old Posted May 2, 2019, 4:53 AM
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