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  #1  
Old Posted May 22, 2010, 9:55 PM
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max7 max7 is offline
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Question Which famous architect would you want to build in San Antonio?

My personal favorite famous architect would be Santiago Calatrava. I would want him to build a bridge over the Riverwalk or a twisting torso building like the one in Malmo, Sweden. I think San Antonio needs a famous architect to put his or her signature on the city, Since we ARE the 7th largest city in the United States!!! :yes

Santiago Calatrava Masterpieces:
Twisting Torso; Malmo, Sweden--54 floors

Unity Bridge; Monterrey, Mexico
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Mayor Castro: San Antonio 2010-2020 IS The Decade of Downtown

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Last edited by max7; May 24, 2010 at 12:19 AM. Reason: grammatical errors
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  #2  
Old Posted May 22, 2010, 10:05 PM
UTSABA06 UTSABA06 is offline
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Jeanne Gang. She is the architect behind Chicago's new skyscraper Aqua. It's simply amazing. Would love to have her design a new signature tallest building for SA.

Aqua Building, 82 Stories-Downtown Chicago:

design-daily.com
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  #3  
Old Posted May 28, 2010, 5:15 AM
arhavel arhavel is offline
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I'm by no means famous, but as an architecture student, wanted to share a personal adaptive-reuse project I'm working on, and didn't no where else to post it.

Its the Brown Dry Cleaners building on Josephine St. across from Hawthorne Academy. With Pearl close by, I spotted this gem and couldn't help but want to sketch just a little of what it could be.

Retail/Restaurants/Offices on the first floor with two perpendicular breezeways bisecting the first floor.
Live/Work Studios on the small separated second floors.

Any other ideas?

Before:




Concept:


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  #4  
Old Posted May 28, 2010, 1:51 PM
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I would add at least one floor, maybe up to 3, just to add a few more regular residential units. With it being catercorner to a river entrance and close to the Pearl, I would add as many units as I could squeeze in there.
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  #5  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2010, 3:45 AM
Sigaven Sigaven is offline
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Me! When I'm famous.

I plan on building stuff like this
http://image02.webshots.com/2/2/49/8...7TlVmiL_fs.jpg
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  #6  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2010, 4:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigaven View Post
Me! When I'm famous.

I plan on building stuff like this
http://image02.webshots.com/2/2/49/8...7TlVmiL_fs.jpg
Sigaven!! the link does not work.
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  #7  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2010, 8:42 PM
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Hey Arhavel, your concept of the old dry cleaners on Josephine Street looks to me Romanesque. It also looks like St. Mark's Cathedral in Venice, Italy!
Did St. Mark's have any influence over your inspiration to rework this valuable piece of real estate?



St. Mark's Cathedral in Venice, Italy
*architect is unknown*
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Mayor Castro: San Antonio 2010-2020 IS The Decade of Downtown

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  #8  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2010, 3:27 AM
arhavel arhavel is offline
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Wow! I definitely see what you're saying, but I didn't even know of this building when drawing it. I was actually trying to reference the original art-deco aesthetic of the building, and build upon that, especially with the bricks.

I've decided in more recent drawings to scale down the front facade, and focus on building up, a lot like the way the St. Benedict's complex worked out (does anyone know the architect or firm in charge of that?) for residential or live/ work studios. And also if its possible to bisect the building to make breeze-ways (smaller, but similar to the ones in the Full Goods building).

I'm hoping to meet with the owner, maybe see the inside, and see what plans they have in store for the structure.
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  #9  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2010, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arhavel View Post
I've decided in more recent drawings to scale down the front facade,
I'm sure the HDRC would appreciate that. It would more than likely have to keep the original "look" and have any additions made of different material.

Quote:
Originally Posted by arhavel View Post
and focus on building up,
Good idea.

Quote:
Originally Posted by arhavel View Post
a lot like the way the St. Benedict's complex worked out (does anyone know the architect or firm in charge of that?) for residential or live/ work studios. And also if its possible to bisect the building to make breeze-ways (smaller, but similar to the ones in the Full Goods building).

I'm hoping to meet with the owner, maybe see the inside, and see what plans they have in store for the structure.

St. Benedicts - Sprinkle & Co. Architects
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It is the city trying to escape the consequences of being a city
while still remaining a city. It is urban society trying to eat its
cake and keep it, too.
- Harlan Douglass, The Suburban Trend, 1925
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  #10  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2010, 4:39 AM
arhavel arhavel is offline
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While I'm continuing on this feasibility plan, this has also spawned another project. While I'm in town for the Summer, I'd like to compile some research on local San Antonio adaptive reuse projects--Interviewing the people who designed, and developed the spaces, as well as the way the people who use them frequently feel about the spaces.

I'm particularly interested in the comparisons in the responses of the structures' inhabitants, and those who designed them (as well the designer's original intentions). For instance, while one could argue that the Quarry is adaptive reuse, do the center's shoppers feel connected to the history of the space, acknowledge it, or find it at all unique (as someone visiting the Pearl, SAMA, or the Fine Silver building might).

So, basically, what makes adaptive reuse "work" for San Antonio, and what are the basic philosophical points to be made when designing old structures intelligently, and with its inhabitants in mind? How do designers communicate a space's history, or environment in these spaces?

Are there any particularly unique adaptive reuse projects (aside from Pearl, that's a given) either for their extraordinary quality or ways in which the projects might have failed or disappointed you?

So far I'm thinking SAMA, Pearl, Fine Silver Building, Quarry Market, Blue Star Arts Center, CAMP Street & Chris Park, (International Center), St. Benedict's & Convent Liberty Bar, Douglas Elementary School. What am I missing---remember, think "good" and "bad" redevelopment. Contrast is key.
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  #11  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2010, 3:21 PM
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Casbeers, Federal Courthouse, Emily Morgan Hotel, Sheraton Gunter, Travis Lofts, SteelHouse Lofts, Judson Lofts, Casino Club, Arsenal building, St. Mary's College/Omni, Spaghetti Warehouse, Neisners/Towneplace, Albertsons/TriPoint, Rackspace, ....
I have access to a few historical photos that might give me a few more places.

Every time I think of "bad" redevelopment, I think of something outside the core; giant empty big boxes come to mind.
Usually what makes them work is smart design for re-use... urban design with humans as the focal point, not cars and parking spaces. We have a glimpse of how 98% of our built envioronment here in SA, suburban-style, will fail us; it's lack of potetial for re-use and "one-time use" designs.
The success of these old buildings is the thought that was put into building them in the first place pre-zoning; the qualities that humans look for when they decide to use/live/work in a certain space. What works for re-use is what has worked around the world for thousands of years before suburbia.
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It is the city trying to escape the consequences of being a city
while still remaining a city. It is urban society trying to eat its
cake and keep it, too.
- Harlan Douglass, The Suburban Trend, 1925

Last edited by miaht82; Jun 3, 2010 at 3:52 PM.
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  #12  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2010, 5:49 PM
kornbread kornbread is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arhavel View Post
Are there any particularly unique adaptive reuse projects (aside from Pearl, that's a given) either for their extraordinary quality or ways in which the projects might have failed or disappointed you?

So far I'm thinking SAMA, Pearl, Fine Silver Building, Quarry Market, Blue Star Arts Center, CAMP Street & Chris Park, (International Center), St. Benedict's & Convent Liberty Bar, Douglas Elementary School. What am I missing---remember, think "good" and "bad" redevelopment. Contrast is key.
Sunset Station
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  #13  
Old Posted Jun 9, 2010, 11:58 PM
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I wouldn't mind if Henry Cobb came to make a landmark building here in San Anonio like he did most especially for Los Angeles. The U.S. Bank Tower is the highest among all the other buildings of Los Angeles. It looks like a parent and its young gathered around it. I like the setbacks and the angular crown, most especially when it is lighted at night. It is also suppose to withstand a major seismic event. Here are a few of Cobb's works of art!

U.S. Bank Tower; Los Angeles, CA--73 stories

Torre Espacio; Madrid, Spain--57 stories

Hyatt Centre; Chicago, IL--48 stories


Here is his website for those who want to learn more about him and his other buildings:

Pei Cobb Freed & Partners:

http://www.pcf-p.com/a/f/
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Mayor Castro: San Antonio 2010-2020 IS The Decade of Downtown

Go Spurs (NBA) , Go Talons (arena football) , Go Scorpions (soccer) , Go UTSA Roadrunners (college football) , Go Rampage (hockey)
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  #14  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2010, 2:27 AM
arhavel arhavel is offline
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Does anyone know anything about this gorgeous building?



Its at at the meeting of Bowie, E. Houston, and Starr downtown. I'm not even sure if its still there; I found this image on google maps and was able to find it with the Vidorra construction in the background.

It looks like the older sister to the building at the Olmos Park McCullough circle. And definitely deserves a similar retouching.
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