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  #41  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 1:47 PM
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1ajs 1ajs is offline
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Originally Posted by Andy6 View Post
True, but this way you get the project and the economic benefits it brings at the beginning of the saving process, rather than at the end. You also get the benefit of private-sector efficiency which should lower the overall costs as well.
as long as the city does not force unionization on the contractors.......
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  #42  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 3:19 PM
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Originally Posted by BlackRedGold View Post
True but claiming that your BRT can be converted to LRT at a later date is misleading. Cities don't switch BRT to LRT since converting it causes problems for the people using BRT and the money spent won't significantly increase ridership compared to creating a brand new LRT line for similiar money.
Without turning this into yet another "city vs city" thread, I can think of at least one city that converted BRT into LRT - and is still doing so.
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  #43  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 4:44 PM
BlackRedGold BlackRedGold is offline
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Originally Posted by freeweed View Post
Without turning this into yet another "city vs city" thread, I can think of at least one city that converted BRT into LRT - and is still doing so.
Which city is that?
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  #44  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 10:49 PM
Greco Roman Greco Roman is offline
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Originally Posted by freeweed View Post
Without turning this into yet another "city vs city" thread, I can think of at least one city that converted BRT into LRT - and is still doing so.
Exactly.

It's not an impossible task, just depends on the layout of the system, but even then accomodations can be made.
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  #45  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 12:46 AM
BlackRedGold BlackRedGold is offline
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Originally Posted by Albertaboy View Post
Exactly.

It's not an impossible task, just depends on the layout of the system, but even then accomodations can be made.
It's not that it can't be done. It's just that pouring potentially billions of dollars to convert BRT to LRT isn't going to make a big enough difference in ridership to justify spending the money on upgrading an existing line instead of putting the money towards a new rapid transit line that will increase ridership far more significantly.
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  #46  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2013, 4:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Shodan View Post
City unveils $2-B mega-fix
Roads, bridges among projects to get cash over next six years


Sat Jan 13 2007

By Bartley Kives

IN what Mayor Sam Katz's financial analyst calls a race against the clock, the City of Winnipeg is trying to fix as many roads and bridges as possible before skyrocketing construction costs make the repairs impossible.

The 2007 capital budget, an infrastructure-spending plan unveiled by Katz on Friday afternoon, will see the city spend $2 billion on roads, bridges and other infrastructure over the next six years -- including $424 million in 2007 alone.

That's a $600-million increase over last year's six-year forecast of $1.4 billion and single-year spending of $308 million.

The increased spending is made possible by $209-million worth of federal and provincial infrastructure money and a plan to use public-private partnerships to pay for $107-million worth of new projects over the next six years.

And it's designed to get the jump on construction costs that rose 30 per cent in 2006, thanks to the building boom in white-hot Alberta and the rising cost of materials around the globe.

"We're doing a lot more work a lot quicker, which will avoid a heck of a lot of the escalation of construction prices," said Old Kildonan Coun. Mike O'Shaughnessy, chairman of city council's finance committee.

He described the 2007 capital budget as the biggest in the city's history -- and the first attempt in decades to whittle away at the city's infrastructure deficit.

"We're catching up a little bit for the first time since Unicity. We've fallen further and further behind every year since 1972," O'Shaughnessy said.

"This is the first year where we're minimally catching up. We need continued support from the provincial and federal governments to go on with what we're doing."

Major projects in the 2007 capital budget forecast include a $91-million effort to fix the decaying Disraeli Freeway, a $35-million plan to extend Chief Peguis Trail from Henderson Highway to Lagimodiere Boulevard and a $17-million rehabilitation of the Fort Garry Bridges over the Red River at Bishop Grandin Boulevard.

Other projects that will elicit cheers from motorists include extra lanes for stretches of Inkster Boulevard, McGillivray Boulevard and St. Anne's Road, at a cost of $13.6 million, $11.5 million and $5.6 million respectively.

New funding initiatives, meanwhile, include $12-million worth of red light synchronization over the next six years and increased annual funding for both playground replacement ($1.75 million a year, up from $250,000 in 2006) and bike-trail creation ($1.5 million, up from less than $200,000).

"As everybody knows, for years, due to circumstances I won't go into, we watched our city crumble. It's been going on for a long time -- we didn't have the money to maintain it," Katz said after he tabled the 2007 capital budget.

"Last year we made some inroads, and this year we've taken a major step forward."

More contentiously, the city will explore the creation of public-private partnerships to pay for the Disraeli and McGillivray projects and also build three new police stations.

Public-private partnerships -- or P3s, for short -- allow the city to avoid paying for the cost of construction up front. Basically, the city asks a private company to build or fix a bridge, road or building, which the city then leases or buys back at a later date.

Usually, the private company is also expected to maintain the infrastructure as long as it owns it. Proponents of P3s say the deals could provide the city with cost certainty and spare taxpayers the pain of construction-cost overruns.

"There's absolutely no doubt in my mind that P3s are a way of saving money," said Katz, who promised to pursue P3s during his 2006 re-election campaign.

Both the mayor and O'Shaughnessy said the city will only pursue P3s after conducting due diligence to ensure the cost of the privately financed projects will be lower than construction financed by borrowing from banks, a practice Winnipeg has avoided during both the Katz and Glen Murray administrations.

But the plan to allow the private sector to front the cost of the three civic projects has created an unusual dynamic at city council: Left-wing Coun. Jenny Gerbasi is accusing conservative mayor Katz of being fiscally irresponsible.

"We're borrowing $100 million up front to invest in infrastructure," said Gerbasi. "We haven't borrowed like for a long, long time, so this is a huge shift in policy."

Coun. Dan Vandal, another left-of-centre councillor, added he is not convinced private companies can borrow money more cheaply than governments can.

Private construction consortiums can, however, be more flexible and creative than city-managed operations and ultimately deliver the work more cheaply, said Chris Lorenc, president of the Manitoba Heavy Construction Association.

He praised Katz for pursuing P3s, adding such deals have the added benefit of allowing the construction industry as a whole to plan ahead.

"We have been preaching this mantra to all levels of governments for years," Lorenc said.

"As soon as you are able to let us know what your demands for construction projects are, the sooner you can tender them and the better off you're going to be in terms of the industry being able to schedule itself and come to the table with more competitive prices."

City council will vote to approve the 2007 capital budget on Jan. 25.

What the city plans to spend the money on

MAJOR projects and new facets of the 2007 capital budget, the city's blueprint for spending on roads, bridges and buildings:

The plan calls for $2 billion in infrastructure spending over the next six years, including $424 million in 2007. The previous capital budget called for $1.4 billion in spending over six years, including $308 million in 2006 alone.

The increased spending -- which is being applauded by groups representing motorists and the construction industry -- was made possible by increased funding from the federal and provincial governments.

SPENDING OVER SIX YEARS

* $823 million on sewers and wastewater treatment
* $498 million for roads and bridges
* $164 million on water treatment
* $145 million on Winnipeg Transit
* $82 million for land drainage and flood control
* $43 million for police stations and equipment
* $31 million to finish the $43 million rec-centre overhaul that began in 2006

NEW PROJECTS & INITIATIVES

DISRAELI FREEWAY
$91 million

The biggest new construction project in the city's plans will see the decaying Disraeli Bridge and Overpass repaired as soon as possible, probably through a public-private partnership. The city hopes to complete repairs by 2009.

CHIEF PEGUIS TRAIL
$34.8 million

After more than a decade of talk, the city will extend Chief Peguis from Henderson Highway to Lagimodiere Boulevard in 2008 and 2009.

FORT GARRY BRIDGES
$17 million

Both eastbound and westbound spans of Bishop Grandin over the Red River are getting rehab in 2008 and 2009. An extra lane will be added to the westbound bridge to allow traffic to exit to Pembina Highway.

INKSTER BOULEVARD
$13.6 million

Answering the prayers of truckers, Inkster will be get extra lanes between Keewatin Street and Brookside Boulevard in 2009 and 2010.

TRAFFIC LIGHT SYNCHRONIZATION
$12 million

The fulfilment of a Sam Katz re-election campaign promise will see traffic lights synchronized on as-yet-unknown major routes between 2008 and 2012.

MCGILLIVRAY BOULEVARD
$11.5 million

Driving to Big Box Land and Whyte Ridge will no longer be a nightmare as the city will pursue a public-private partnership to add extra lanes to McGillivray between Waverley Street and Columbia Drive. The work will be completed in 2008.

OSBORNE STREET BRIDGE
$8.6 million

Full rehab of both bridges over the Assiniboine River in 2011 and 2012.

STURGEON ROAD BRIDGE
$8 million

A new bridge will replace the aging span over Sturgeon Creek in 2012.

JUBILEE OVERPASS
$6.1 million

Full bridge rehab of span above Pembina Highway in 2010.

ST. ANNE'S ROAD
$5.6 million

Widening from Southglen Boulevard to Aldgate Road. No target date for completion.

PLAYGROUND REPLACEMENT
$1.75 million per year

Playgrounds around the city get an annual replacement-funding boost from a paltry $250,000 in 2006.

NEW BIKE TRAILS AND WALKWAYS
$1.5 million per year

Following another Katz campaign promise -- and a summer of conflict between cyclists and motorists -- the annual funding for trail creation takes a big leap from just under $200,000 in 2006, when it was lumped in with sidewalks as a budget line item.

OTHER SPENDING

REGIONAL STREET REHAB & REPAIR
$30 million in 2007

Sections of Corydon Avenue, McPhillips Street, Henderson Highway and other busy routes get help. Visit www.winnipegfreepress.com to for a list of road-repair projects to major streets.

LOCAL STREET REPAIRS
$14.5 million in 2007

Visit www.winnipegfreepress.com to see if your street will be repaired this summer.

-- Compiled by Bartley Kives

P3 OR NOT TO P3

That would be the question, as city hall is about to explore $107 million worth of public-private partnerships.

WHAT'S A P3?

A public-private partnership is a deal between a government and a private company or group of companies. For the purposes of the City of Winnipeg, it would be a construction deal that would see a private consortium build or fix a road, bridge or building.

WHAT'S THE ADVANTAGE TO THE CITY?

P3s allow the city to avoid paying for a new project while it's under construction. Once it's finished, the city leases or buys back the piece of infrastructure, which the private company usually is expected to maintain. The plan is supposed to provide the city with cost certainty -- and avoid cost overruns.

WHAT ARE THE DISADVANTAGES?

Unless the city is very careful when it draws up the deal, P3s could wind up being more expensive than publicly financed projects. Critics say P3s are all about short-term gain and long-term pain.

HAVE WE SEEN A P3 IN WINNIPEG BEFORE?

Yes. The Charleswood Bridge was completed on time and on budget in the 1990s. But critics say it cost too much to conduct the due diligence before the contract was signed.

SO, ARE P3S A GOOD IDEA?

It really depends on the deal. There are examples of both beneficial and detrimental P3s around the world -- just as there are examples of wise and foolish politicians.

-- Bartley Kives

© 2007 Winnipeg Free Press. All Rights Reserved.
_________________________________________________________________

WEB EXTRA: Street repairs planned

Sat Jan 13 2007

According to the 2007 capital budget, the City of Winnipeg has $30 million to spend on regional road rehabilitation projects as well as less-extensive repairs known as mill-and-fill works.

REGIONAL STREET REPAIRS

Here are the major routes slated to be fixed this summer:
BISHOP GRANDIN BOULEVARD: St. Anne’s Road to Lakewood Boulevard
BROOKSIDE BOULEVARD: Eagle Drive to north of Inkster Boulevard
BUFFALO PLACE: Fennell to Otter Streets
CORYDON AVENUE: Cambridge Street to Kenaston Boulevard; Nassau to Lilac Streets
DAKOTA STREET: Bishop Grandin Boulevard to Meadowood Drive
GRANT AVENUE: Pembina Highway to Stafford Avenue; Kenaston Boulevard to Lanark Street
GUNN ROAD: Redonda Street to Plessis Road
HENDERSON HIGHWAY: Essar to Rowandale Avenues; Munroe to Leighton Avenues
HIGGINS AVENUE: Austin to Annabella Streets
INKSTER BOULEVARD: Main Street to Lansdowne Avenue
KING EDWARD STREET: Saskatchewan to Ellice Avenues
LAGIMODIERE BOULEVARD: Fermor Avenue to East Mint Place
LOGAN AVENUE: Weston to Blake Streets
McGILLIVRAY BOULEVARD: Waverley to Irene Streets
McPHILLIPS STREET: Swailes Avenue to Murray Road; Chamberlain to Mountain Avenues
NESS AVENUE: Belvidere to Moorgate Streets
OSBORNE STREET: Togo to Stradbrook Avenues
PANET ROAD: Munroe to Kimberly Avenues
PEMBINA HIGHWAY: Stafford Street to Grant Avenue; Markham Road to Bison Drive
PORTAGE AVENUE: Whytewold Road to Sharp Boulevard; Westbrook to Fort Streets
SHERBROOK STREET: Broadway to Portage Avenue
ST. MARY’S ROAD: Tache to Traverse Avenues
TUXEDO BOULEVARD: Kenaston Boulevard to Corydon Avenue
VAUGHAN STREET: York to Graham Avenues
WAVERLEY STREET: Bishop Grandin Boulevard to Bison Drive

RESIDENTIAL STREET REPAIRS

The city has $14.5 million to spend this year on residential roads. Here’s the first batch of streets the city plans to repave, rebuild or rehabilitate:
ALFRED AVENUE: From McGregor to McKenzie Streets
ANGLIA STREET: From Mandalay Drive to Scarfe Street
ARDEN AVENUE: From No. 62 to Darwin Street
BARKER BOULEVARD: From Barker Boulevard to Musgrove Street
CENTENNIAL STREET: From Academy Road to Kingsway
CHANCELLOR DRIVE: From its north leg to Lake Point Road
CRYSTAL AVENUE: From St. Mary’s to St. Thomas Roads
DALY STREET NORTH: From Gertrude to McMillan Avenues
DEVON AVENUE: From Roch to Rothesay Streets
DONALDA AVENUE: From Brazier to Roch Streets
ELIZABETH ROAD: From De Bourmont to Bleau Avenues
FOLKSTONE BOULEVARD: From Exmouth to Glastonbury Boulevards
FURBY STREET: From Ellice to Portage Avenues
GALLOWAY STREET: From Mountain to Church Avenues
GARDEN GROVE DRIVE: From Fairgrove Bay’s east leg to Kinver Avenue
GERTRUDE AVENUE: From Wellington Crescent to Daly Street North
HARVARD AVENUE: From Wilton to Rockwood Streets
HAVELOCK AVENUE: From Neepawa Street to St. David Road
HEARNE AVENUE: From Mount Royal Road to Lodge Avenue
HINDLEY AVENUE: From St. George to St. Anne’s Roads
HORACE STREET: From Tache Avenue to St. Mary’s Road
JAMISON AVENUE: From Roch to Watt Streets
JEFFERSON AVENUE: From Mandalay to Argate Drives
KINVER AVENUE: From King Edward Street to Cropo Bay’s west leg
LAKEPOINT ROAD: Syracuse Crescent to Chancellor Drive
LAURA STREET: From Alexander to Logan Avenues
LAWNDALE AVENUE: From Highfield to Kirkdale Streets
MARKWOOD PLACE: From Egesz Street to end
McLEOD AVENUE: From Gateway Road to London Street
MERRIAM BOULEVARD: From Pembina Highway to Riverside Drive East
MORTIMER PLACE: From Machray Avenue to St. Cross Street
OWENA STREET: From Alexander to Logan Avenues
PANDORA AVENUE WEST: From Owen Street to Bournais Drive
PERTH AVENUE: From Andrews to McGregor Streets
POWERS STREET: From Enniskillen to Perth Avenues
RALEIGH STREET: From Kimberley Avenue to Roberta Avenue
RIVERTON AVENUE: From Watt to Allan Streets
ROCKWOOD STREET: From Corydon to Fleet Avenues
SANSOME AVENUE: From Rouge Road to Westwood Drive
SHARP BOULEVARD: From Bruce to Lodge Avenues
SHELLEY STREET: From Wordsworth Way to McBey Avenue
SWEETWATER BAY: In its entirety
VICTORIA AVENUE EAST: From Kanata to Roanoke Streets
VICTOR STREET: From St. Matthews to Portage Avenues
WEATHERSTONE PLACE (north leg): In its entirety
WINDERMERE AVENUE: From Derek to Beaumont Streets

© 2007 Winnipeg Free Press. All Rights Reserved.
How many of us thought the city would follow through on all the major projects listed at the top of the list, not to mention within the 6 year time frame?
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  #47  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2013, 8:37 PM
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Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
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Woah did they actually? That's awesome Congrats! So much great stuff goin on.
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  #48  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2013, 9:17 PM
bomberjet bomberjet is offline
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The wastewater deal is still to be determined. The CoW signed that $600M deal with Veolia and I haven't heard boo since then. That was a couple years ago now and there's no new plants built.

But all the rest is basically done!
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  #49  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2013, 4:31 AM
JamieDavid Exchange JamieDavid Exchange is offline
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Posts: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shodan View Post
City unveils $2-B mega-fix
Roads, bridges among projects to get cash over next six years


Sat Jan 13 2007

By Bartley Kives

IN what Mayor Sam Katz's financial analyst calls a race against the clock, the City of Winnipeg is trying to fix as many roads and bridges as possible before skyrocketing construction costs make the repairs impossible.

The 2007 capital budget, an infrastructure-spending plan unveiled by Katz on Friday afternoon, will see the city spend $2 billion on roads, bridges and other infrastructure over the next six years -- including $424 million in 2007 alone.

That's a $600-million increase over last year's six-year forecast of $1.4 billion and single-year spending of $308 million.

The increased spending is made possible by $209-million worth of federal and provincial infrastructure money and a plan to use public-private partnerships to pay for $107-million worth of new projects over the next six years.

And it's designed to get the jump on construction costs that rose 30 per cent in 2006, thanks to the building boom in white-hot Alberta and the rising cost of materials around the globe.

"We're doing a lot more work a lot quicker, which will avoid a heck of a lot of the escalation of construction prices," said Old Kildonan Coun. Mike O'Shaughnessy, chairman of city council's finance committee.

He described the 2007 capital budget as the biggest in the city's history -- and the first attempt in decades to whittle away at the city's infrastructure deficit.

"We're catching up a little bit for the first time since Unicity. We've fallen further and further behind every year since 1972," O'Shaughnessy said.

"This is the first year where we're minimally catching up. We need continued support from the provincial and federal governments to go on with what we're doing."

Major projects in the 2007 capital budget forecast include a $91-million effort to fix the decaying Disraeli Freeway, a $35-million plan to extend Chief Peguis Trail from Henderson Highway to Lagimodiere Boulevard and a $17-million rehabilitation of the Fort Garry Bridges over the Red River at Bishop Grandin Boulevard.

Other projects that will elicit cheers from motorists include extra lanes for stretches of Inkster Boulevard, McGillivray Boulevard and St. Anne's Road, at a cost of $13.6 million, $11.5 million and $5.6 million respectively.

New funding initiatives, meanwhile, include $12-million worth of red light synchronization over the next six years and increased annual funding for both playground replacement ($1.75 million a year, up from $250,000 in 2006) and bike-trail creation ($1.5 million, up from less than $200,000).

"As everybody knows, for years, due to circumstances I won't go into, we watched our city crumble. It's been going on for a long time -- we didn't have the money to maintain it," Katz said after he tabled the 2007 capital budget.

"Last year we made some inroads, and this year we've taken a major step forward."

More contentiously, the city will explore the creation of public-private partnerships to pay for the Disraeli and McGillivray projects and also build three new police stations.

Public-private partnerships -- or P3s, for short -- allow the city to avoid paying for the cost of construction up front. Basically, the city asks a private company to build or fix a bridge, road or building, which the city then leases or buys back at a later date.

Usually, the private company is also expected to maintain the infrastructure as long as it owns it. Proponents of P3s say the deals could provide the city with cost certainty and spare taxpayers the pain of construction-cost overruns.

"There's absolutely no doubt in my mind that P3s are a way of saving money," said Katz, who promised to pursue P3s during his 2006 re-election campaign.

Both the mayor and O'Shaughnessy said the city will only pursue P3s after conducting due diligence to ensure the cost of the privately financed projects will be lower than construction financed by borrowing from banks, a practice Winnipeg has avoided during both the Katz and Glen Murray administrations.

But the plan to allow the private sector to front the cost of the three civic projects has created an unusual dynamic at city council: Left-wing Coun. Jenny Gerbasi is accusing conservative mayor Katz of being fiscally irresponsible.

"We're borrowing $100 million up front to invest in infrastructure," said Gerbasi. "We haven't borrowed like for a long, long time, so this is a huge shift in policy."

Coun. Dan Vandal, another left-of-centre councillor, added he is not convinced private companies can borrow money more cheaply than governments can.

Private construction consortiums can, however, be more flexible and creative than city-managed operations and ultimately deliver the work more cheaply, said Chris Lorenc, president of the Manitoba Heavy Construction Association.

He praised Katz for pursuing P3s, adding such deals have the added benefit of allowing the construction industry as a whole to plan ahead.

"We have been preaching this mantra to all levels of governments for years," Lorenc said.

"As soon as you are able to let us know what your demands for construction projects are, the sooner you can tender them and the better off you're going to be in terms of the industry being able to schedule itself and come to the table with more competitive prices."

City council will vote to approve the 2007 capital budget on Jan. 25.

What the city plans to spend the money on

MAJOR projects and new facets of the 2007 capital budget, the city's blueprint for spending on roads, bridges and buildings:

The plan calls for $2 billion in infrastructure spending over the next six years, including $424 million in 2007. The previous capital budget called for $1.4 billion in spending over six years, including $308 million in 2006 alone.

The increased spending -- which is being applauded by groups representing motorists and the construction industry -- was made possible by increased funding from the federal and provincial governments.

SPENDING OVER SIX YEARS

* $823 million on sewers and wastewater treatment
* $498 million for roads and bridges
* $164 million on water treatment
* $145 million on Winnipeg Transit
* $82 million for land drainage and flood control
* $43 million for police stations and equipment
* $31 million to finish the $43 million rec-centre overhaul that began in 2006

NEW PROJECTS & INITIATIVES

DISRAELI FREEWAY
$91 million

The biggest new construction project in the city's plans will see the decaying Disraeli Bridge and Overpass repaired as soon as possible, probably through a public-private partnership. The city hopes to complete repairs by 2009.

CHIEF PEGUIS TRAIL
$34.8 million

After more than a decade of talk, the city will extend Chief Peguis from Henderson Highway to Lagimodiere Boulevard in 2008 and 2009.

FORT GARRY BRIDGES
$17 million

Both eastbound and westbound spans of Bishop Grandin over the Red River are getting rehab in 2008 and 2009. An extra lane will be added to the westbound bridge to allow traffic to exit to Pembina Highway.

INKSTER BOULEVARD
$13.6 million

Answering the prayers of truckers, Inkster will be get extra lanes between Keewatin Street and Brookside Boulevard in 2009 and 2010.

TRAFFIC LIGHT SYNCHRONIZATION
$12 million

The fulfilment of a Sam Katz re-election campaign promise will see traffic lights synchronized on as-yet-unknown major routes between 2008 and 2012.

MCGILLIVRAY BOULEVARD
$11.5 million

Driving to Big Box Land and Whyte Ridge will no longer be a nightmare as the city will pursue a public-private partnership to add extra lanes to McGillivray between Waverley Street and Columbia Drive. The work will be completed in 2008.

OSBORNE STREET BRIDGE
$8.6 million

Full rehab of both bridges over the Assiniboine River in 2011 and 2012.

STURGEON ROAD BRIDGE
$8 million

A new bridge will replace the aging span over Sturgeon Creek in 2012.

JUBILEE OVERPASS
$6.1 million

Full bridge rehab of span above Pembina Highway in 2010.

ST. ANNE'S ROAD
$5.6 million

Widening from Southglen Boulevard to Aldgate Road. No target date for completion.

PLAYGROUND REPLACEMENT
$1.75 million per year

Playgrounds around the city get an annual replacement-funding boost from a paltry $250,000 in 2006.

NEW BIKE TRAILS AND WALKWAYS
$1.5 million per year

Following another Katz campaign promise -- and a summer of conflict between cyclists and motorists -- the annual funding for trail creation takes a big leap from just under $200,000 in 2006, when it was lumped in with sidewalks as a budget line item.


© 2007 Winnipeg Free Press. All Rights Reserved.
As much as we all like to rag on our current mayor, he does stick to his word. Six years ago, he pledged to complete all these projects. Each one is done. That holds merit.
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  #50  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2013, 5:16 AM
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Originally Posted by JamieDavid Exchange View Post
As much as we all like to rag on our current mayor, he does stick to his word. Six years ago, he pledged to complete all these projects. Each one is done. That holds merit.
Your right, what a guy!
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  #51  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2013, 5:19 AM
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Originally Posted by rrskylar View Post
Your right, what a guy!
Even added in a few fire halls.
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  #52  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2013, 1:27 PM
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rypinion rypinion is offline
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Originally Posted by Danny D Oh View Post
Even added in a few fire halls.
Almost got us a waterpark too!
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  #53  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2013, 2:39 PM
CoryB CoryB is offline
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Originally Posted by rypinion View Post
Almost got us a waterpark too!
You mean almost got us three water parks: 1) CanadInns @ Polo Park, 2) Canalta @ Parcel 5, 3) Great Wolf Lodge @ Seasons of Tuxedo.
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