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  #121  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2008, 3:28 PM
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A rendering is now available for the aforementioned Arpeggio in Berkeley:



Source: Curbed SF.
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  #122  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2008, 7:20 PM
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From: http://www.socketsite.com/

Budding Big Buildings Across The Bay (Oakland And Emeryville)

Encinal Jackson has submitted an application to build a 56-story mixed-use tower at 1938 Broadway in Oakland. At 715 feet, the proposed tower would nearly double the height of Oakland’s current tallest building, the Ordway at 1 Kaiser Plaza.

The proposed tower would contain 1.5 million square feet of space, including 790,000 square feet of office, 320,000 square feet of parking, 75,000 square feet of retail and 220 residential units.
The building, designed by global architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, features a modern, glass-lined cylindrical shape with a section that curves down one side resembling a roll of fabric unraveling.
And while Encinal Jackson proposes to build 1.5 million square feet up, TMG Partners has received approval to build "1.5 million square feet of residential, retail, office space and parks" across Emeryville’s EmeryBay Market Place.
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  #123  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2008, 8:03 PM
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More on the building
http://sanfrancisco.bizjournals.com/...08/story4.html

Highrise hopes in Oakland
Soaring tower eyed
San Francisco Business Times - by Blanca Torres

East Bay developer Peter Wang is back for round two of trying to develop the tallest building in Oakland.

After withdrawing a previous application to build a 63-story tower, Wang’s firm, Encinal Jackson, submitted an application to build a 56-story tower rising to 715 feet at 1938 Broadway. The building would dwarf the city’s current tallest structure, the Ordway Building at 1 Kaiser Plaza, by more than 300 feet.

“(Oakland) does not have a landmark on its city-scape and that creates a lack of identity,” Wang said. “The city of Oakland deserves to have a very beautiful building like this.”

The proposed tower would contain 1.5 million square feet of space, including 790,000 square feet of office, 320,000 square feet of parking, 75,000 square feet of retail and 220 residential units.
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Last edited by San Frangelino; Sep 5, 2008 at 8:23 PM.
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  #124  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2008, 8:24 PM
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Also nearby http://sanfrancisco.bizjournals.com/...08/story7.html

Friday, September 5, 2008

TMG moving Emeryville from suburbs to city
San Francisco Business Times - by Blanca Torres

Developer TMG Partners has received approvals to add up to 1.5 million square feet of residential, retail, office space and parks to Emeryville’s EmeryBay Market Place, its 14-acre office and retail project. The addition and overhaul would turn a suburban-style development into an “urban village.”

Right now, if you drive down Christie Avenue past 64th Street, you see lots of big box buildings and enough asphalt to park 1,100 cars. Within a decade, the same site could become a place where people can live, work, shop, play and ditch their cars.

“The goal in developing this site is to make it really convenient to leave your car,” said Denise Pinkston, a partner with TMG who is working on the project. “The development plan is to take that auto-dominated site and turn it into a urban neighborhood over time.”

Emeryville, a city that takes up just over 1 square mile of space, has encouraged the creation of more mixed-use developments, like this one, in its general plan.
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  #125  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2008, 11:00 PM
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Quote:
Friday, September 12, 2008
Oakland to Kaiser plan: Start over
Official dubs design ‘hideous’
San Francisco Business Times - by Chris Rauber and Blanca Torres

Like a couple in a troubled marriage, Kaiser Permanente and Oakland can’t seem to agree on Kaiser’s massive seismic rebuild of its flagship hospital.

After a year of talks, the Oakland Planning Commission has given Kaiser a thumbs-down on its latest design proposal for the estimated $900 million project, sending the health-care giant back to the drawing board.

Michael Colbruno, chairman of the Oakland Planning Commission, said the commission considers the design boring and unattractive. The design, by the NBBJ architecture firm, is offensive, Colbruno said, considering that Kaiser was founded in Oakland and remains headquartered there.

“I compared it to something pre-Berlin Wall coming down in East Germany,” Colbruno said. “The design is, for lack of a better word, hideous.”




The rejection could mean a major delay in Kaiser Permanente’s plans to rebuild its Oakland Medical Center, which could cost $900 million, not including nearby medical office buildings, clinics and other facilities.

The planning commission asked Kaiser to come up with a new plan by its Oct. 15 meeting.

The new 349-bed hospital is part of a complex, 900,000-square-foot, $1 billion-plus expansion and replacement project that also involves constructing two medical office buildings, a 500-space parking structure, a 1,200-space parking garage and other support buildings. Kaiser needs to complete the hospital portion by January 2013 to meet state seismic safety regulations, or at least make a good-faith effort to meet that deadline.

“We’ll go back and take another look,” said Michael Lane, Kaiser’s project manager for the huge rebuild. “That’s what we’re looking at right now.”

Lane acknowledged that planning commissioners took exception to the look of the proposed hospital’s 12-story tower, which includes a three-story podium or base, saying it looked like a “big blank box” without enough surface variation to be appealing.

Other complaints included lack of a “defined top” and the lack of an on-street entrance for the cafeteria and pedestrian-friendly walkways.


Colbruno said the commission’s harsh feedback should not come as surprise to Kaiser, which has discussed its design ideas with the community and the planning commission several times since its review process started a year ago.

“They’ve had the comments; they’ve ignored them,” Colbruno said.

Kaiser was surprised by the commission’s stance, Lane said, and had no inkling the commission would raise such significant issues at this stage in the process.

“We had a recommendation from the staff to approve this design,” he said. “So, as a team, we’re asking ‘What else do we need to do?’”

The commission’s main objective is to avoid saddling Oakland with an eyesore, Colbruno said. This decision is the first time he can remember that the six-member planning commission unanimously opposed the design of a commercial building.

“Some people think that in Oakland, people can get away with cutting corners on design, and this commission is against that. There’s some beautiful new buildings in Oakland,” he said, citing new buildings by developers SKS and Shorenstein and the new cathedral. “People can certainly do the work, and Oakland deserves it.”

On other fronts, Lane said Kaiser’s been making progress on its $80 million, 165,000-square-foot medical office building and parking structure at Broadway and West MacArthur Boulevard, which he said is still on track to be completed by next summer. That five-story structure is being built on the former site of a Honda dealership.

Once the new medical office building is completed, the existing one at MacArthur and Piedmont Avenue will be demolished to make room for the new hospital. Barring further delays, that part of the musical-chairs process is expected to start by the first half of next year, Lane said earlier this year, and be completed by the Jan. 1, 2013, state deadline.

Within a few years after that, construction of a 120,000-square-foot medical office building and 1,200-slot parking garage is expected to begin in the space cleared by demolition of the current 350-bed hospital, which dates from the early 1940s.

Extended planning delays on the hospital could result in additional holdups on other portions of the huge endeavor.

crauber@bizjournals.com / (415) 288-4946 btorres@bizjournals.com / (415) 288-4960
Source: http://sanfrancisco.bizjournals.com/...ml?t=printable

I know Michael Colbruno. He's a nice guy with political connections (he started as a reporter for a gay newspaper, became an aide/press spokesperson to Assemblywoman Carole Migden--when I was a volunteer aide in the same office--and, after moving to the East Bay, eventually got his present job). But he is most decidedly NOT an architect. On the other hand, I guess he knows what he likes as well as anyone.
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  #126  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2008, 11:32 PM
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Wierd. This may be one the few, if not the only, time I've seen a design rejected with a big contributor being its rejectful design. The design really does look bland and boring, and I'm glad it was rejected.
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  #127  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2008, 5:10 AM
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According to http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfranci.../focus3.html#1, " developer Jack Myers has ordered the steel for the second tower in his 670,000-square-foot Centennial project, even though he has not landed an anchor tenant for phase one, set for completion in December."

Here is the website for the project: http://www.thecentennialtowers.com/
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  #128  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2008, 7:21 AM
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Ah, I was not aware that project involved a second tower. I actually havent seen this building since I dropped off my cousin at the airport and therefore used 101. I've spent a good deal of time in Marin, but I'll have to check up on this one again soon. Thanks for that info.
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  #129  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2008, 5:37 PM
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The glass has a much bluer tint than you see in the renderings:
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  #130  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2008, 2:45 AM
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And just up the road from Centennial Towers
From: http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfranci...1/focus13.html

Quote:
Details of Baylands plan debated
San Francisco Business Times - by Tony C. Yang

The future of Brisbane sits on the Baylands’ 660 acres of vacant land, one of the last large undeveloped parcels on the Peninsula.

What that future looks like depends on how Brisbane reconciles the developer’s proposal for 8 million square feet of mixed-use development with alternatives pushed by some in the community.

Among the issues to be hashed out are how much open space the project will have and how much — if any — housing will be built. Universal Paragon Corp.’s proposal to build housing has only come into sharp focus in the past year or so. Just how many residents to add to a close-knit “village” of 3,600 people is a big question.

Meanwhile, UPC, the Taiwanese firm that owns and is developing the property between Highway 101 and Bayshore Boulevard, is pushing its green vision for the site, touting an energy-neutral, high-density development near transit with LEED silver buildings.
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  #131  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2008, 11:34 PM
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Back on Centennial: I noticed this morning that there was a concrete pumper boom and the base of a tower crane visible at the site of the second building. This afternoon the pumper was no longer visible. I would infer from this that the foundation has been poured and the tower crane will be assembled shortly.
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  #132  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2008, 4:57 AM
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...And back to Oakland.

From: http://www.abetteroakland.com/the-ta...one/2008-09-09
Encinal Tower, 715 feet, 56 stories


...And two others!
From: http://www.abetteroakland.com/the-ta...and/2008-06-18
Quote:

...So this would basically be right behind the Kaiser Center (386 feet tall, BTW). Swig owns the Kaiser Center, as well as the adjacent garage and “mall.” If the project gets approved, the mall goes. In its place, we would get two new office towers. One would be 34 stories, or 436 feet. The other would be 42 stories, or 566 feet...
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  #133  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2008, 5:17 AM
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Wow, look at Oakland trying to take some of spotlight. I like what I see about those other two towers, and I continued to be amazed by what seems to be known now as Encinal Tower.
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  #134  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2008, 2:27 PM
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Here are more renderings from an old post. The buildings are designed by SOM...just like the 715 ft Tower http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=152989
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  #135  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2008, 4:33 AM
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  #136  
Old Posted Sep 23, 2008, 3:10 AM
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More on High Rises for Berkeley

full article at:http://www.berkeleydailyplanet.com/i...onmental-Study


Quote:
Commissioners Add Two New High-Rises To Downtown Plan Environmental Study

By Richard Brenneman
Friday September 19, 2008
Berkeley Planning Commission members, missing two of their most outspoken dissenters Wednesday night, boosted by 50 percent the number of 120-foot buildings to be included in the environmental study for the new downtown plan.

While the move doesn’t guarantee that the two additional high-rises would be built, it does ease the approval process by potentially eliminating the need for separate environmental impact reports for the added high rises.

Two of the buildings would be located on university-owned downtown sites, with the other four on private property.

Commissioners are working through the plan, prepared over the course of two years by the Downtown Area Plan Advisory Committee, to have their own proposed revision ready for the City Council, which must approve it by May or risk the loss of some of the university funds promised the city as mitigation for 800,000 square feet of new construction by 2020.

In addition to the increased number of 120-footers, City Planning and Development Director Dan Marks said the EIR will also include four 180-foot point towers and two 220-foot hotel towers.

But just because the tall buildings are included in the environmental review, Marks said it is “extremely unlikely” the full number would be built in the plan’s 20-year time frame.

While DAPAC members had repeatedly resisted staff suggestions that they welcome so-called “point towers” to the downtown skyline, the committee eventually compromised on four 120-foot-tall buildings and two taller hotel towers. A proposal to include two additional point towers failed by a single vote.

But DAPAC executive director Will Travis, who was sitting in on the Planning Commission as a temporary member along with Teresa Clark, said he hadn’t thought the limit of four applied to the university property, then suggested adding a fifth.

It was Commissioner James Novosel, an architect who has designed several downtown Berkeley buildings, who proposed adding another, bringing the total to six, with two of them on university property.

UC Berkeley Planner Jennifer McDougall said the university might be interested in the future in locating one high rise near the intersection of Hearst Avenue and Oxford Street, and said another possible site might be adjacent to University Hall on Oxford.

“God knows with this economy, but the university could be moving forward with some big project sooner or later and we don’t want it to come as a big surprise” to the community, she said.

The school is looking for partnerships with commercial developers as well, she said.

When it came to questions of building massing—how much of the potential volume of the site a structure would occupy—commissioners loosened DAPAC standards for purposes of the EIR, raising by 10 feet, to 85 feet, the height at which taller buildings would have to be stepped back from the lot line to allow solar access to nearby property and for the aesthetics of the streetscape.

Travis suggested eliminating setbacks and leaving the final building configuration to the design review process, but Marks said that would produce an EIR with “buildings that look like the Great Western building, and I’m pretty sure that in Berkeley, we don’t want that.”

The Great Western Building—most recently called the Power Bar building—is the cheese-grater-like structure at the southwest corner of Shattuck Avenue and Center Street.

Commissioner David , himself a former UC Berkeley planner, called a requirement for setbacks at any height below 120 feet extreme, which was music to McDougall’s ears. She said said the school didn’t want any setbacks for its 120-footers, and if the city wanted to prepare an EIR with the setbacks, “it would have to be clear that this was something the university wasn’t going along with.”

Marks said the plan could be made “a little more flexible”—a phrase repeated several times in the course of the meeting.

Another source of flexibility, commissioners suggested, could come from reducing the package of mitigations DAPAC wanted from developers as a price for building structures higher than most committee members had wanted.

The commissioners ultimately approved a study that will include setbacks at 85 feet.
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  #137  
Old Posted Sep 23, 2008, 3:32 AM
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While I like the sound of the plans and details, I have my doubts this will see the light of day, especially if its as is. After all, its Berkeley.
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  #138  
Old Posted Sep 23, 2008, 5:19 AM
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It's not that all of them would ever happen, but it does mean that at least one of them would have a better chance. This gives the downtown plan more flexibility. The more plots in the study, the more likely a proposal that pencils out might come to life at one of them.
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  #139  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2008, 2:16 AM
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Visual update on Centennial. Sorry about the quality. It was shot from a moving bus:
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  #140  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2008, 5:03 PM
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Oakland condos don’t add up for developers

Quote:
Friday, October 3, 2008
Oakland condos don’t add up for developers
San Francisco Business Times - by Blanca Torres

Condo developers in Oakland are doing plenty of number crunching these days to figure out if projects they had planned can make money, but in many cases the numbers say “no way.”

Residential markets across the country have been hit by the mortgage and credit crises, but the East Bay has been especially susceptible. The other part of the equation is construction costs, which haven’t slid as significantly as home prices.

Average home prices in Alameda County fell 29 percent last year to $440,000 in August, compared with $619,000 the previous year, according to DataQuick, a Southern California real estate information service.

“The numbers absolutely don’t work in places like Oakland and the East Bay,” said Alan Mark, president of Mark Co., a San Francisco real estate research firm. “There’s no way a developer could build a condo building and break even today.”

Construction costs depend on several factors including the price of land, materials, government fees, labor, marketing and loan interest, said Joseph Perkins of the Home Builders Association of Northern California. Another major issue is securing a loan in today’s tight credit market.

The East Bay’s real estate meltdown follows a surge of building sparked by former Oakland Mayor Jerry Brown’s 10K initiative. Oakland and Emeryville have about 1,600 to 1,700 available condos on the market in major developments and more than 500 are under construction with another 8,000 that have been approved by the City of Oakland, said a recent Mark Co. report.

“You are going to see the brakes put on a lot of projects that originally had some rosy prospects,” said Raphael Bostick, associate director of the Lusk Center for Real Estate. “Some developers will resort to deep discounting to clear the market as quickly as possible and other developers will hold out hope to get as close as they can to being profitable.”

Yet some developers still want to build. One is Carlos Plazola, chair of the Oakland Builders Alliance and president of Terra Linda Development in Oakland, who continues to seek a way to build a 14-unit project on Oakland’s waterfront. He thinks he could build the units as rentals and later convert them to condos. Producing rentals is also risky, because the rates often barely cover construction costs or a developer decides to sustain a loss over time.

“Eventually, the question becomes can we do it in two years or 10 years?” Plazola said. “How long will it take for the market to recover?”
Source: http://sanfrancisco.bizjournals.com/...ml?t=printable
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