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  #21  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2006, 4:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malec
84 bn to build the whole city.
25 years to build the whole city. They will build it in parts
ok! man! thank u for answer...
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  #22  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2006, 4:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Damien
Does the Tower of Babel come to mind to anyone else?
yes of course!! I was talking with my mom respect of this new building and she told me!! Oh god! I´m thinking in babel tower!!
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  #23  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2006, 4:45 AM
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This is crazy, never even herad of this place before.
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  #24  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2006, 4:54 AM
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Wow, impressive.
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  #25  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2006, 12:30 PM
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will this really get built?
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  #26  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2006, 1:50 PM
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The tower and the city look and sound intriguing, but between all the new devlopment in UAE, Qatar, and Kuwait itself, where are the 700,000 additional people coming from to populate the city? Just wondering.
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  #27  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2006, 3:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polishavenger
at 84 billion pounds to construct to house only 7000 people, how can this be economically justified?
of course it can't be economically justified. No skyscraper too much over 1000 feet can be, because you have to give up more and more floor area to utilities and elevators. supertalls are for show, and this is ridiculous.

awesome design though, however impractical it might be.

edit- ExIth, these new cities are a last-ditch too-late effort by these countries to diversify their economies in the face of the fact that their oil reserves are declining and they currently have nothing to replace them.
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  #28  
Old Posted May 27, 2006, 12:44 PM
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Atkins wins tallest tower in the world
by Sean Cronin and Angela Giuffrida
Saturday, 27 May 2006

Atkins has been appointed structural engineer on what is set to become the tallest tower in the world — and at one kilometre tall would eclipse the Burj Dubai.

The 250-storey Mubarak Tower in Kuwait would be almost twice the size of the world’s current tallest building — Taipei 101 in Taiwan.

The record-breaking structure will form the centrepiece
of the US $150 billion (KD43.3 billion) Madinat al Hareer, or ‘City of Silk’.

The 1,001m-tall tower would form the centrepiece of the Madinat al Hareer
- City of Silk - a proposed US $150 billion development in Northern Kuwait.


Architects at Kuhne and Associates are behind the designs for the tower and the city development, which will be built over 25 years.

“Everything has been unanimously endorsed — the Emir of Kuwait and prime minister have backed the project,” said a spokesperson at Eric Kuhne and Associates.

“We’re just waiting on final approval and for a planning committee to be formally set up to front the project.”

According to Mike Otlet, director and head of structures at Atkins, the tower would form ‘a complete city in the sky’, and would be made up of offices, apartments, a school, a medical centre, and possibly a mosque.

“The tower will be built in three blocks linked together, which will give us more flexibility in terms of the lifts,” he said.

“We’re working with lift specialists on how we can develop and install larger lifts. We’re also exploring the wind force measures that would be needed for a structure of 1,001 metres.”

The City of Silk, described as ‘the new Manhattan’, will cover a 250km2 site in Subiya, Northern Kuwait — transforming
the area into a hub for up to 700,000 people.

The project will create a major new city at the gateway to the famous Silk Route across central Asia, and will be linked to
Kuwait City by a new bridge — the Jabir Al Kabir.

Significant new infrastructure, including a new seaport, railway and an international airport will be built to support the development. Construction is expected to start in September.

“Kuwait is a low energy city, so we will have to look into this and other environmental aspects,” added Otlet.

“We’re confident we’ll get final approval from the Kuwaiti government. It’s a long process because at the moment nobody can buy land or accommodation unless they’re a Kuwaiti resident. So the parliamentary rules on development will need to be changed.”
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  #29  
Old Posted May 27, 2006, 12:54 PM
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So they're actually serious about building this thing?
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  #30  
Old Posted May 30, 2006, 3:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malec
So they're actually serious about building this thing?


It seems like they are pretty serious... sounds cool.... guess I'll have to go and visit Kuwait when I'm about 50..... I plan on taking a trip to Dubai in maybe 10 years.. .. so many places to see... so little time.... and not enough money That is a nice update though. But yeah, since they have to actually have the country's laws changed just so they can get it approved, it will be a nice slowwwww process... but luckily there are many other cities and buildings growing to keep us entertained while this happens
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  #31  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2006, 7:57 AM
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the middle-east! amazing
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  #32  
Old Posted Jun 9, 2006, 7:20 PM
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This one will be a beauty if/when it happens
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  #33  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2006, 2:05 AM
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Saturday, 24 June 2006
Building on new-found confidence?
by Rupert Cornford ITP Business

Highlights:

A recent report on Kuwait labelled this oil-rich Gulf country as ‘emerging’. With the economy slowly waking up from the jitters of nearly 15 years’ of tension with Iraq following the 1990 invasion, the country is now said to be experiencing rapid growth after the fall of Saddam Hussein’s regime in 2003.

Added to the fact that Kuwait sits on 10% of the world’s proven oil reserves and the government is looking more and more at inward investment, a recipe for an economic explosion certainly looks to be cooking up.

So what will this mean for the construction industry? “I think you are going to see more private money involved in government projects,” says de Lange. “Hopefully things will move a little faster.”

Another big test for Kuwait will be the planned development of a new town in Subiya, northern Kuwait. Named the City of Silk or Madinat Al Hareer, a new town for 500,000 residents has been in the pipeline for decades.

“Planners have dreams and targets, and the thing about Subiya — if and when it’s built — is that it will be the first time that a town will be established that will be totally independent of Kuwait City,” says de Lange. “So psychologically it’s a huge quantum leap.

“All the development in Kuwait so far is physically and emotionally linked to Kuwait City. Even Al Khiran [Pearl City — a residential development close to the Saudi Arabia border] down in the south is at the end of the motorway that drives into the city,” continues de Lange.

“There has been a natural reluctance for this quantum leap to start a completely new city.”

But this reluctance may be showing signs of disappearing. According to Atkins, approval for a 1km-high Burj-beating tower on the development has been endorsed by the powers that be in the Kuwaiti government.

“We’re just waiting on final approval and for a planning committee to be formally set up to front the project,” said Mike Otlet, director and head of structures, Atkins. “We’re confident we’ll get final approval from the Kuwaiti government. It’s a long process because at the moment nobody can buy land or accommodation unless they’re a Kuwaiti resident. So the parliamentary rules on development will need to be changed.”

So on the face of it, with plans to develop world-record breaking towers, the confidence of the Kuwait government in its construction industry seems to moving in the right direction.

But Al-Jaouni is not so sure. “I have very little information, but it may not fly,” he says of the Subiya project. “First of all, why would you want to go 1km tall? For an area that is completely undeveloped, it is premature.

“In terms of master planning, Subiya Town has been on the drawing board since 1983 — it was revised in 1986/87 and now it is coming back to life, but it could take another 20 years to be developed,” he adds.

Al-Jaouni goes on to say that there is an increasing demand for residential housing, and that he could see a town in Subiya being developed to some extent. “There is a demand for housing projects, specifically private housing developments, and we are starting to see satellite housing towns all over the country, especially on the borders for security reasons.”

But whether the City of Silk is born into a 500,000-strong city or a smaller satellite town, the cogs that are pushing this development forward have definitely started to turn again.

So with all the factors in place for the construction industry to up the ante and genuinely compete with its powerful GCC neighbours, Kuwait is showing the signs of wanting to fully emerge from the shade and develop to its maximum potential.

With the growth of hungry private investors, a renewed sense of confidence in the government and a traditionally reliable construction industry, Kuwait is looking to find its feet, benefit from the reconstruction of Iraq and define its own controlled construction explosion that will see it learn from the lessons of the UAE and Qatar, all the while keeping its feet firmly on the ground.

“Kuwait was supposed to be what Dubai is now, but the occupation stopped many projects,” says Akil A Lookman, senior architect and project manager, Gulf Consult.
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  #34  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2006, 3:01 AM
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  #35  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2006, 6:14 AM
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here in Argentina there is a similar proyect. A 1000 mts skyscraper was proposed few months ago.



you can visit de web site to have further information about the proyect to be builded in Buenos Aires, Argentina

www.grupotorcello.com.ar
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  #36  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2006, 3:53 PM
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Geez! Where are all these great skyscrapers coming from?!!

I'm so excited!
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  #37  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2006, 4:17 PM
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Fordham Spire anyone?
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  #38  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2006, 7:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krazy
Fordham Spire anyone?
Yea, it looks very similar.
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  #39  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2006, 7:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LostInTheZone
of course it can't be economically justified. No skyscraper too much over 1000 feet can be, because you have to give up more and more floor area to utilities and elevators. supertalls are for show, and this is ridiculous.

awesome design though, however impractical it might be.

edit- ExIth, these new cities are a last-ditch too-late effort by these countries to diversify their economies in the face of the fact that their oil reserves are declining and they currently have nothing to replace them.
In big cities I think it's justified because of the lack of development space....or where the real estate value is so high that it is practial. It's just many of the cities putting up large towers really don't need them. Places like Manhattan, Hong Kong, Tokoyo, etc could use them.
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  #40  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2006, 3:30 AM
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This is insane!!
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