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  #1  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2016, 4:51 PM
Dan0myte Dan0myte is offline
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Regina Residential Construction

To keep clutter out of the main construction thread, here's a separate thread to discuss suburban neighbourhood construction projects, infill development and substantial home renovations around the Queen city.
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  #2  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2016, 5:09 PM
Dan0myte Dan0myte is offline
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Crescents Neighbourhood:
  1. 13 Leopold Crescent: Demolition complete, site cleanup progressing.


  2. 36 Angus Crescent: New foundation poured, house construction is starting.


  3. 2707 Harrington Mews: House framing substantially complete.




Albert Park Neighbourhood:
  1. 62 Lowry Place: Major revamping of house floor plan, construction underway.


  2. 6 McGill Place: Renewal of the home with expanded second story. Construction underway.

Last edited by Dan0myte; Sep 8, 2016 at 3:22 PM.
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  #3  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2016, 5:40 PM
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This "95% new" 40 year old home on Leslie place is for sale for $1.65 million.



http://www.point2homes.com/CA/Home-F.../29233576.html
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  #4  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2016, 12:47 AM
BrutallyDishonest2 BrutallyDishonest2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Stormer View Post
This "95% new" 40 year old home on Leslie place is for sale for $1.65 million.



http://www.point2homes.com/CA/Home-F.../29233576.html
I was going to say that that house isn't much of a looker, but then I realize what an abomination the previous iteration was.
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  #5  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2016, 4:41 AM
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I was going to say that that house isn't much of a looker, but then I realize what an abomination the previous iteration was.
I like the design. Prairie Style - Frank Lloyd Wright
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  #6  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2016, 1:23 PM
BrutallyDishonest2 BrutallyDishonest2 is offline
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I like the design. Prairie Style - Frank Lloyd Wright
It's only Wrightian in the most basic of ways IMO. The windows are all off for that style and the proportions are too massive. To me it just looks like they slapped an Artisan Homes design on top and called it a day (and I generally preferred their builds to the standard suburban homes.)

I think it primarily is oversized roofing material and the front door that primarily turn me off.

I'm much more partial to this redesign.
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  #7  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2016, 12:39 AM
Draftsman Draftsman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormer View Post
This "95% new" 40 year old home on Leslie place is for sale for $1.65 million.



http://www.point2homes.com/CA/Home-F.../29233576.html
Don't know if anyone noticed (or cares) but the list price of this house was reduced by $260,000 and is now available for the low, low price of $1,390,000!
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  #8  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2016, 9:16 PM
Dan0myte Dan0myte is offline
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The foundation for 13 Leopold is being poured. If you remember the previous home, it looks like the new home is going to follow roughly the same footprint. It will be interesting to see what style the homeowner chose to go with and how much of the original materials are reused in the construction.

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  #9  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2016, 10:17 PM
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More info on the former 13 Leopold. I am afraid it was an eclectic mess not worthy of saving. I love streamlined and art moderne homes, but this was a mess.

http://heritageregina.ca/13-leopold-...ay-to-history/
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  #10  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2016, 5:17 PM
dsmmace dsmmace is offline
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That's a house?!?
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  #11  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2016, 6:16 PM
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With our expansive clay soil in Regina, it doesn't make sense to build with a basement. I'm hoping to start construction of a fourplex spring 2017 using screw piles, and having a heated crawlspace.

There are too many houses here with failing foundations, it just doesn't make sense to continue building the way we do.
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  #12  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 12:44 AM
BrutallyDishonest2 BrutallyDishonest2 is offline
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With our expansive clay soil in Regina, it doesn't make sense to build with a basement. I'm hoping to start construction of a fourplex spring 2017 using screw piles, and having a heated crawlspace.

There are too many houses here with failing foundations, it just doesn't make sense to continue building the way we do.
While I agree that Regina has terrible soil conditions, I'd still build a basement for a house. The space that a basement provides is invaluable to me and those purchasing homes.

A properly engineered basement with piles and proper drainage/backfill will last a good long time.
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  #13  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 1:10 AM
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StealthGirl StealthGirl is offline
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There are areas of Regina where basements consistently have issues (see Whitmore Swamp), but a lot of areas do not have issues. I think it's a generalization that basements are a bad idea here.
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  #14  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 4:48 PM
Dan0myte Dan0myte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrutallyDishonest2 View Post
While I agree that Regina has terrible soil conditions, I'd still build a basement for a house. The space that a basement provides is invaluable to me and those purchasing homes.

A properly engineered basement with piles and proper drainage/backfill will last a good long time.
Agreed. The home at 13 Leopold is being constructed with piles. They poured roughly 10 of them, ~15 feet deep. Including the depth of the basement they will go down about 25 feet from ground level.

Also, the aerial perspective of the property is deceiving. What's shown in that picture is the footings which are about 10 feet below ground level. They will then pour basement walls on top of the footings to bring the basement up to ground level.
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  #15  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 5:47 PM
Treesplease Treesplease is offline
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Originally Posted by Dan0myte View Post
Agreed. The home at 13 Leopold is being constructed with piles. They poured roughly 10 of them, ~15 feet deep. Including the depth of the basement they will go down about 25 feet from ground level.

Also, the aerial perspective of the property is deceiving. What's shown in that picture is the footings which are about 10 feet below ground level. They will then pour basement walls on top of the footings to bring the basement up to ground level.
The footprint of the foundation looks quite small. Given all the expense and hastle they have gone through I would have thought they were building a bigger house.
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  #16  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2016, 6:24 PM
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Are screw piles the answer?? I'm not an expert on the subject, but have heard numerous things about not using them. Something about the screw going through the clay can cause issues with capacity. As in the screw just chews up the soil and you really have nothing supporting the load.
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  #17  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2016, 4:43 AM
someguy someguy is offline
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Are screw piles the answer?? I'm not an expert on the subject, but have heard numerous things about not using them. Something about the screw going through the clay can cause issues with capacity. As in the screw just chews up the soil and you really have nothing supporting the load.
A 12" screw pile will support the same amount as a 12" concrete pile, they are significantly cheaper, the top is the same as a telepost, so they provide adjustability if there is movement. I have used screw piles on the last few projects that I have done, and at under $300 a piece, they cost less and do the same job.

Clay soil moves, concrete is very rigid and cannot take some of those stresses. IMO, there is no reason to fight the movement,
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  #18  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2016, 7:02 PM
The Bess The Bess is offline
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I deal with screw piles all the time supporting energy plants and other industrial installations. I have seen no problems with them. You basically alter the pipe size and the helical size and amount based on the load you need.
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  #19  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2017, 12:16 PM
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Nope

Last edited by jigglysquishy; Feb 9, 2017 at 3:14 PM.
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  #20  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2017, 1:05 PM
BrutallyDishonest2 BrutallyDishonest2 is offline
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Originally Posted by jigglysquishy View Post
I have yet to see a modern box that I like. And they don't fit the neighborhood at all. What's the point of infill if it's not increasing density? Stucco is one of the cheapest and kitschiest materials available and no one has pulled it off yet.

Thankfully the city is banning flat roofs on infill.
And that's why we don't let the public dictate architecture. Otherwise we'll be stuck pretending that neo-Victorian pastiche is worthy of discussion.

No one has pulled off stucco? LOL!

The city is not banning flat roofs. And those houses don't have flat roofs, only the appearances of it.
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