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  #81  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 3:27 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
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Some people might be surprised to find an area like this within NYC: https://goo.gl/maps/pJsFziNyAEGZRWH17. Breezy Point is in Queens, just across the inlet from Brooklyn, but it feels like a small beach town on eastern Long Island or down the Jersey Shore.

City Island in the Bronx is also an outlier for NYC. It's sort of like a New England coastal community, and it is known for the seafood restaurants that line City Island Avenue: https://goo.gl/maps/LpUaxHgBgUEcTcbZ9
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  #82  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 5:39 PM
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Originally Posted by muppet View Post
Yep, but all fruitless now. Millennials prefer to drink less, dance less -though there's a big resurgence in 'retro' illegal raves among Generation Y. Pubs and clubs have been closing at record rates, every nightlife district is becoming a smoking shell.
Gen Y and Millennials are the same thing...
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  #83  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 5:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
Some people might be surprised to find an area like this within NYC: https://goo.gl/maps/pJsFziNyAEGZRWH17. Breezy Point is in Queens, just across the inlet from Brooklyn, but it feels like a small beach town on eastern Long Island or down the Jersey Shore.

City Island in the Bronx is also an outlier for NYC. It's sort of like a New England coastal community, and it is known for the seafood restaurants that line City Island Avenue: https://goo.gl/maps/LpUaxHgBgUEcTcbZ9
That's interesting; are there ways to get to those places via public transportation?
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  #84  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 6:01 PM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
That's interesting; are there ways to get to those places via public transportation?
Yes for City Island, which has a bus route along City Island Ave. Sort of for Breezy Point, which is mostly private residential. The closest bus stop is at Fort Tilden beach (here: https://goo.gl/maps/Nz6otcKtb7EMPfFu6). From there it's about a mile walk to where I linked before.
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  #85  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 6:04 PM
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Breezy Point is actually a private community, and overwhelmingly Irish and German. There's another private community, in Brooklyn, called Seagate, which is almost entirely Orthodox Jewish.
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  #86  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 2:08 PM
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Originally Posted by ue View Post
Gen Y and Millennials are the same thing...
sorry meant Gen Z, current teenagers
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  #87  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 2:19 PM
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Originally Posted by IrishIllini View Post
Hasn't the east side experienced some serious disinvestment. Major not Detroit style, but looks more apparent than even Milwaukee or even Cleveland. A bit like Pittsburgh?
Yes, but a huge chunk of the inner city is still very healthy. That's very different than Detroit et al in that manner, especially considering how much smaller Buffalo is than most other rust-belt cities. It's core and neighbourhoods stretching to the north that are in good shape make the city feel much larger than it is.

I can tell you that for the longest time my impression of Buffalo was very similar to that of Detroit - run down and falling apart. Largely because that's what I saw from the interstate as I drove through. Once you get off the interstate and actually explore though, the city has so much to offer.
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  #88  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 3:07 PM
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Originally Posted by IrishIllini View Post
Hasn't the east side experienced some serious disinvestment. Major not Detroit style, but looks more apparent than even Milwaukee or even Cleveland. A bit like Pittsburgh?
The level of blight within the city of Pittsburgh is way, way less than Cleveland. It's more or less confined to a handful of pockets comprising about 20% of the land area, with much of the city being pretty much intact.
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  #89  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 3:08 PM
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^ yes Buffalo wins the award for biggest discrepancy between the detroitish impressions from the highway and the actual urban experience (on the west /north side of town at least)

https://flic.kr/p/ptuxZV
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  #90  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 5:22 PM
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I'd agree re. Buffalo. Looks horrible from the interstates, actually much more Rustbelt-y looking than Detroit.

But has a pretty high proportion of vibrant, desirable, walkable neighborhoods. Much more like Pittsburgh than Detroit. Also feels much bigger than it is. Smaller metro than Grand Rapids, but feels 3-4x as big.
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  #91  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 5:44 PM
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Buffalo is in some ways like a Chicago in miniature, as it has different "sides" which radiate out from Downtown.

The area right near the waterfront to the northeast of Downtown is intact, working class, and racially diverse. I think it's plurality Latino, but there are lots of blacks, whites, and Asians as well.

There is a band running due north from Downtown - starting with the gorgeous historic neighborhood of Allentown and running all the way to city limits - which is very white and very yuppie.

Then every neighborhood fanning out from Downtown to the northeast or east is majority black. The blight is concentrated in those neighborhoods closest in. Some of the outer neighborhoods are quite intact.

South Buffalo is still an overwhelmingly working-class white area. Little in the way of walkability.
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  #92  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 5:57 PM
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^ Buffalo's closest cousin these days is probably Milwaukee, it's brother from another mother on the other end of the lakes.
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Last edited by Steely Dan; Jul 2, 2020 at 6:27 PM.
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  #93  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 6:30 PM
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London lol.

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  #94  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 9:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Buffalo is in some ways like a Chicago in miniature, as it has different "sides" which radiate out from Downtown.

The area right near the waterfront to the northeast of Downtown is intact, working class, and racially diverse. I think it's plurality Latino, but there are lots of blacks, whites, and Asians as well.

There is a band running due north from Downtown - starting with the gorgeous historic neighborhood of Allentown and running all the way to city limits - which is very white and very yuppie.

Then every neighborhood fanning out from Downtown to the northeast or east is majority black. The blight is concentrated in those neighborhoods closest in. Some of the outer neighborhoods are quite intact.

South Buffalo is still an overwhelmingly working-class white area. Little in the way of walkability.
South Buffalo is the most unknown of the unknown parts of Buffalo. It is separated from most of the rest of the city by the Buffalo River, major railroad lines, and the (now former) dirty heavy industries in between. The area has cleaned up rather nicely, and most of it goes unknown and unexplored even by Buffalonians. A lot more walkability than it is given credit for, more than just a working class neighborhood, but relatively isolated compared to the contiguous neighborhoods north of downtown. Beautiful parks and parkways, comparable to those on the West Side. Former industrial waterfront now includes the new Buffalo Harbor State Park, extensive hike and bike trails, and small beaches. Local investment is picking up in the business districts, and old steel industry sites like the Union Ship Canal and Republic Steel at Riverbend are being filled with newer and cleaner industries.

My South Buffalo Neighborhood Flickr Album


Gallagher Beach, on former industrial land in South Buffalo.
by bpawlik, on Flickr


My Buffalo Neighborhood Flickr Albums
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  #95  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 10:38 PM
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I guess outsiders don't know that Edmonton was North America's third largest meat-packing city (behind Chicago and Toronto) so they don't know about the big hole around Fort Road and Belgravia where meat packers like Burns, Gainers, Swift used to be. There are monuments to the big old smokestacks. Most people assume Edmonton is and always was an oil town, but there are still a few packers around and the stockyards are still going strong.
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  #96  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 11:58 PM
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I was expecting Buffalo to be a big Utica (depressing) but was pleasantly surprised.
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  #97  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2020, 1:05 AM
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I don't know if it'd shock people, but Salt Lake City is known for its wide streets and massive blocks, which has directly resulted in a lot of these very narrow streets throughout the city:



































These streets are typically tucked away inside the large blocks, so, not many people realize they exist. There's some decent older housing stock on these streets, as well.
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  #98  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2020, 5:46 AM
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This is the North Kenwood Historic District, in North Kenwood, Chicago:

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8147...7i16384!8i8192

I walked through there for the first time today, it's quite nice (as are the magnificent Greystones nearby on Ellis and Drexel).
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