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Old Posted Sep 26, 2019, 4:48 PM
Handro Handro is offline
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Join Date: May 2017
Location: Chicago
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USA (and parts of Canada and Mexico) regions

Came across this theory of North American regions today, and I'm intrigued. It groups based on historical, cultural, political, economic variances (rather than the traditional regions as the Census Bureau defines them).

It looks pretty on point to me, and I think it does a good job of explaining why the debate of which states are part of which region are so unending--some states are part of several regions, and the way we define them officially and the way we define them culturally are so different.




They are from a book by journlaist Colin Woodard. As he explains:
Quote:
“The borders of my eleven American nations are reflected in many different types of maps — including maps showing the distribution of linguistic dialects, the spread of cultural artifacts, the prevalence of different religious denominations, and the county-by-county breakdown of voting in virtually every hotly contested presidential race in our history,” Woodard writes in the Fall 2013 issue of Tufts University’s alumni magazine. “Our continent’s famed mobility has been reinforcing, not dissolving, regional differences, as people increasingly sort themselves into like-minded communities.” https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs...o-you-live-in/
Since it's a good arbiter for the variables mentioned (history, culture, politics, economics), look how the regions voted in the 2016 election:



https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/30/o...-midterms.html
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