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Old Posted Oct 27, 2007, 3:27 AM
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KevinFromTexas KevinFromTexas is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2001
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He probably would. He works with 3D/I architects. He had sent me a few GIS maps that showed some heights for downtown San Antonio. They're on PDF file. What those are are satellite images. The maps contain two heights for a site. One shows the elevation of the land, and the other is the elevation of the land, plus the elevation of whatever structure stands there. So subtract the higher number from the lower one and you get the height of the building. These aren't exact however. I've looked at similar maps in Austin that had heights off by 5 to 10 feet, so I've not used these as an official source on building heights for that reason.

The best source is always the blueprints. But there are other good sources of building heights. Back in the 1950s there was a company that surveyed many buildings for fire insurance maps. These were for insurance, but also local fire departments used them. These were especially helpful with finding heights of old buildings. Older buildings become harder and harder to get heights for since blueprints and other documents get lost through the years, and often the architects who designed them either passed away, or the architecture firm doesn't exist anymore.
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