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-   -   SAN DIEGO | Boom Rundown, Vol. 2 (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//showthread.php?t=126473)

spoonman Jan 24, 2017 7:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Flying Dutchman (Post 7688017)
A measly 800 housing units on 55 acres? WTF. That's less than one house per acre. On a site with a trolley through it. Council better vote NO on this non-starter P.O.S. "Deal".

The article said "INCLUDING" 800 units for SDSU students. Didn't say "Up to".

Northparkwizard Jan 25, 2017 2:03 AM

Page number 619. Use it wisely people ...

HurricaneHugo Jan 25, 2017 5:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nerv (Post 7688054)
Anyone know what the building height limits are in Mission Valley? I know they've proposed towers in the past in the 225-300 foot range but is there a current max limit there?

No taller than the valley's rim

BS limit, could have a couple of 600 footers there

Leo the Dog Jan 25, 2017 5:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 7689416)
No taller than the valley's rim

BS limit, could have a couple of 600 footers there

Imagine the view from University-Normal Heights/Kensington if MV was full of towers!

The Flying Dutchman Jan 25, 2017 7:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leo the Dog (Post 7689428)
Imagine the view from University-Normal Heights/Kensington if MV was full of towers!

I was thinking the same exact thing. Latest article re: the whole Uptown upzoning debacle: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2...ists-sue-city/

Also see: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2...using-heights/

Note that even though the latest plan calls for a 200 ft. build height limit (up from 65 ft.), density bonuses can easily double the limits. So I wouldn't be surprised to see 30 or even 40 footers in Uptown. That will be interesting to see.

Also to read:

Important article re: East Village/Downtown from the business community:
https://www.bisnow.com/san-diego/new...s-future-70109

JerellO Jan 25, 2017 8:48 PM

I wish they'd built more high rises in Hillcrest... there's so much potencial there

spoonman Jan 25, 2017 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Flying Dutchman (Post 7689981)

Note that even though the latest plan calls for a 200 ft. build height limit (up from 65 ft.), density bonuses can easily double the limits. So I wouldn't be surprised to see 30 or even 40 footers in Uptown. That will be interesting to see.

Huh? :shrug:

spoonman Jan 25, 2017 10:53 PM

Can someone chime in on whether the Uptown/Hillcrest Community Plan passed? If so, what type of height does it allow?

Lipani Jan 25, 2017 10:56 PM

Hillcrest protested bike lanes; just imagine how they'd feel about higher density. It'll happen sooner or later, though. Housing is only going to get worse than it already is without more supply.

SDfan Jan 26, 2017 3:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Northparkwizard (Post 7689180)
Page number 619. Use it wisely people ...

Lolz!

SDfan Jan 26, 2017 3:59 PM

Looks like Bosa has settled on a new name for it's Kettner tower: Savina

http://savinabybosa.com/?utm_source=...FQWTfgodjZMBGQ

SDfan Jan 26, 2017 4:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spoonman (Post 7690319)
Can someone chime in on whether the Uptown/Hillcrest Community Plan passed? If so, what type of height does it allow?

The Uptown community plan passed, except the council did some amending before the vote. It stripped out the proposed 65' height limit, and kept in place the original density levels which were set to be downzoned. They also asked the city planning department to weigh in on upzoning the Hillcrest core (higher FAR and height limits) at the request of the Uptown Gateway District (those awesome property owners who see the potential for a Little Italy like evolution for Hillcrest).

So far, a community group in Mission Hills, and SOHO have said they will sue the city for not imposing the NIMBY community planning group's original proposals for downzoning and height limits, but we shall see where those go. Community planning groups are advisory, it's the city that gets to make these final decisions.

However, with the density bonus all of this might not matter. As I type, Jonathan Segal is building a 90'-100' mid-rise in Mission Hills (an area that is supposed to be 55' max) thanks to his inclusion of affordable housing in the project. I expect to see a lot more of these situations cropping up in the near future.

Affrojuice Jan 26, 2017 10:46 PM

http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/news_upload...arket-lead.jpg

Making a Mark in Downtown

The University of California San Diego is going urban.

In December, the university announced its plans to build an Innovative Cultural and Education Hub in downtown San Diego at the corner of Park Avenue and Market Street. The new center will connect a wide range of campus programs to the downtown innovation community and more closely link diverse neighborhoods throughout San Diego’s urban core.

UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla said the new facility is designed to deliver on the core tenets of the university’s Strategic Plan to ensure both equity and excellence.

“Our establishment of an urban innovation and educational hub demonstrates our commitment to be bold and build a better university, a better community and a better world,” Khosla said. “This new hub will support economic development downtown while delivering new educational opportunities for our students, faculty and staff and provide a greater connection to communities throughout San Diego.”

UC San Diego Extension will manage the 66,000-square-foot center, which the Holland Partner Group is developing as part of a larger project at the location. The center is slated to be completed in 2020 and will offer educational and cultural programs; it also will house a 3,000-square-foot restaurant on the ground floor and an outdoor amphitheater space. The center will be home to:

academic and outreach programs for middle and high school students from surrounding communities
business incubation and entrepreneurship resources for entrepreneurs throughout the urban core
a venue for arts events and exhibits to showcase the university’s and the larger community’s cultural offerings.
a hub for civic engagement, including applied research and volunteer opportunities.
courses, workshops and seminars relevant to downtown’s growing workforce.
Mary Walshok, UC San Diego’s associate vice chancellor for public programs and dean of Extension, said the new Innovative Cultural and Education Hub will redefine the role of a research university in the 21st century by offering unique educational experiences and research opportunities as well as arts and cultural activities.

“With the diverse neighborhoods surrounding the urban core, including Barrio Logan, the Diamond District and Golden Hill, this project reinforces UC San Diego’s role as a key partner in spurring economic prosperity and inclusion through engaging events and educational offerings.”

The 66,000-square-foot center, at the corner of Park Avenue and Market Street, will also include a restaurant and outdoor space.
The selection of the Park and Market site was driven because of its proximity to the UC San Diego Blue Line. The line will run from San Ysidro to University City and link the main campus in La Jolla with the greater San Diego region and ensure a stronger connection between the university and diverse communities.

“These transportation links that connect the university with the larger community are critical as the city comes of age,” Walshok said. “We want to build this facility to demonstrate that no matter where you come from, there is place for you in the new economy.”

Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer applauded UC San Diego’s efforts and its commitment to the City of San Diego’s ongoing efforts to education and economic development.


http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/news_uploads/park-market-2.jpg

“Landing a university presence in downtown San Diego is a game changer and the result of years of hard work to make it a reality,” Faulconer said. “This new project will continue the revitalization of the East Village neighborhood and, with UC San Diego’s top-notch reputation, provide countless opportunities for collaboration as we prepare students for the jobs of tomorrow.”

No state funds will be used to finance the construction of the project and ongoing financing for the facility will come from a combination of program underwriting, contracts and grants, fees for services and lease revenues, all of which UC San Diego Extension will manage.

The Holland Partner Group received final approval of the entitlements for both the Innovative Cultural and Education Hub and its larger residential project from the San Diego City Council on Dec. 13. The residential project includes 341 market-rate apartments, 85 rent-restricted affordable apartments for very low-income residents and preservation of the historic Remmen House. Construction is slated to begin during the summer of 2017.

By Jennifer Davies
http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/feature/mak...=tw-2016-01-26

spoonman Jan 27, 2017 1:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SDfan (Post 7690982)
The Uptown community plan passed, except the council did some amending before the vote. It stripped out the proposed 65' height limit, and kept in place the original density levels which were set to be downzoned. They also asked the city planning department to weigh in on upzoning the Hillcrest core (higher FAR and height limits) at the request of the Uptown Gateway District (those awesome property owners who see the potential for a Little Italy like evolution for Hillcrest).

So far, a community group in Mission Hills, and SOHO have said they will sue the city for not imposing the NIMBY community planning group's original proposals for downzoning and height limits, but we shall see where those go. Community planning groups are advisory, it's the city that gets to make these final decisions.

However, with the density bonus all of this might not matter. As I type, Jonathan Segal is building a 90'-100' mid-rise in Mission Hills (an area that is supposed to be 55' max) thanks to his inclusion of affordable housing in the project. I expect to see a lot more of these situations cropping up in the near future.

Thanks for the info, SDFan. Does that mean that the original 200ft (?) height limit is still in effect. I think it was 200ft.

The Flying Dutchman Jan 27, 2017 2:50 AM

The limit is 65' but a group of developers are pushing for 200'. Throw in density bonuses and there is the potential for 400' in Uptown. I post articles for a reason, but here they are again:

http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2...using-heights/

http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2...ists-sue-city/

Basically, you have a group of NIMBYs crying hell to high water because like SDFan said, the city amended the community-approved plan at the last second to allow for greater density up to 100'. The developers want up to 200' (likely since steel frame construction is necessary to make a profit and I believe is only feasible after around 20 stories/200' or so). Steel frame is necessary over anything ~60' or six stories. 100' doesn't pencil out for developers, is too high for the NIMBYs, yada yada.

spoonman Jan 27, 2017 4:48 AM

FYI

The height limit was 150-200ft along Washington St and other business corridors before the "interim" height limit was enacted.

http://missionhillsheritage.org/interimordinance.htm

Am I correct to understand that the limit just passed is now 100' everywhere, with the possibility for increases to 200' in certain areas?

The Flying Dutchman Jan 27, 2017 3:32 PM

You are correct. Also interesting to note is that on Park blvd., the west side is considered Uptown (Hillcrest), and parts are considered University heights. The entire eastern side is considered North Park, which is why all the taller buildings are on the eastern side of Park blvd. (That's how I understand it.)

The Flying Dutchman Jan 27, 2017 3:36 PM

"The new North Park Community Plan, which covers 2,260 acres, focuses much future development in two nodes: 30th Street and El Cajon Boulevard and 30th Street and University Avenue.

The plan also encourages replacement of housing built between the 1960s and 1980s that community leaders say veers from the area’s traditional architecture.

In addition, the plan includes incentives for pedestrian–oriented projects on the blocks between Lincoln Avenue and Howard Avenue, and transit-oriented projects along Park Boulevard and El Cajon Boulevard.

The new Uptown Community Plan, which covers 2,700 acres, lifts height limits for new construction by rescinding 2008’s interim height ordinance.

The cap remains 50 feet in Mission Hills, but is 65 feet in Bankers Hill and could rise to 150 feet there with a special permit. And in Hillcrest, buildings can be 100 feet tall east of state Route 163 and 120 feet tall in the central part of the community west of the freeway.

The plan also calls for closing a notorious gap in the University Avenue bike path to improve safety and encourage more commuting by bicycle.

In addition to Mission Hills and Hillcrest, Uptown includes Bankers Hill, Park West, Middletown and University Heights.


The new Golden Hill Community Plan, which covers 745 acres, reduces density in the eastern and central parts of the community and in much of South Park. Density increases in the western portion of Golden Hill, particularly near downtown and San Diego City College.

Two local nonprofits, Mission Hills Heritage and Save Our Heritage, sued the city on Jan. 4 to block the new Uptown plan based on concerns its potential environmental effects hadn’t been properly studied."

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/...106-story.html

I could be wrong, but NP doesn't have a height limit in parts. See this:
https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/defau...denheights.pdf

Lipani Jan 28, 2017 11:18 PM

Big win for San Diego convention center expansion

Quote:

Supporters of a foundering plan to expand San Diego’s convention center on the waterfront were thrown a lifeboat this week when a Superior Court judge rejected a legal challenge to block the development. The project had once been pegged at $520 million before an appellate court cast a pall over it more than two years ago, calling a financing plan unconstitutional.

Common sense, legal savvy and a new financing plan to the rescue?

Lawyer Cory Briggs, whose victory in the appellate case left the convention center expansion in limbo in 2014, lost this latest round when Superior Court Judge Joel Wohlfeil ruled that the California Coastal Commission’s approval had “exhaustively” addressed coastal access and other required issues.

Wohlfeil won’t make his tentative decision final until after a hearing in March, but his announcement couldn’t have come at a better time for Mayor Kevin Faulconer, who resurrected the idea of a contiguous convention center expansion and proposed a hotel tax hike to pay for it two weeks ago. Faulconer told The San Diego Union-Tribune Editorial Board his new proposal could seek to raise the hotel tax from 12.5 percent to 16 percent and that the revenue would be dedicated to the expansion as well as homelessness programs and street repair.

Those other items should broaden support for the measure, although the devil is always in the details. The editorial board has long embraced the idea of a convention center expansion and urged a public vote on a tax increase. In 2013, we wrote, “The worst-case scenario remains the possibility that the center not be expanded at all. Tens of millions in annual tax revenue, and the creation of thousands of jobs, are at stake.”

The convention center expansion still faces two big hurdles: a competing project on the same site and a public vote that requires two-thirds support from San Diegans. If the first hurdle can be cleared, the second will be tougher. Faulconer should flesh out his idea as soon, fully and publicly as possible.
http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/...127-story.html

SDCAL Jan 29, 2017 5:02 PM

It stilll sounds like a long shot (contiguous convention center), but I think it's the best option for the city. A measure that raises the hotel tax to fund a contiguous expansion and fund homeless programs would be great for downtown. The homeless problem keeps getting worse and SD is doing less than other major cities to address it. Helping get people off the streets will be good for them and also good for EV. As for Briggs, that guy is really on a losing streak. First his proposition goes down in flames and now this. Good. He's a parasite. He doesn't give a rat's behind about the environment, he cares about himself and lining his own pockets. The CA coastal commission is pretty thorough and the fact he's trying to argue something they've already approved is ridiculous. It's even more ridiculous that he's against the convention expansion because it would wall-off the bay, but he supports a project that would put a high rise there. What a tool. At least the convention center expansion would have a public rooftop park.


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