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spoonman May 16, 2007 6:07 AM

^They certainly sold it well didn't they

spoonman May 16, 2007 6:17 AM

I found this rendering in the Toronto Forum. I would like to see a residential tower that looks sleek like this...
http://www.architectsalliance.com/im...district_2.jpg

Actually I don't think this is unlike Cosmo Square...Poor poor Cosmo Square :(

SDDTProspector May 16, 2007 6:25 AM

Saw the 700 West proposal
 
I watched the video, I don't care how they try to polish it..... It s still a square box!!!! with ugly windows!!!! looks like it should be in the mid west... not San Diego

spoonman May 16, 2007 6:31 AM

The Pei Cobb tower resembles both the Reed Elsevier building and Corporate Center

Reed Elsevier
http://www.hines.com/toolkit_images/...a_lres_web.jpg

Corporate Center
http://www.chrisaustinphotography.co...d/IMG_3445.jpg

spoonman May 16, 2007 6:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SDDTProspector (Post 2838227)
I watched the video, I don't care how they try to polish it..... It s still a square box!!!! with ugly windows!!!! looks like it should be in the mid west... not San Diego

As a matter of personal opinion, I initially didn't think the building was right. It's not that I thought the building itself was bad, but that it was a letdown to those of us who had hoped for so much more from such a world renowned architecture firm. We were told that the tower would be a landmark building, but clearly it isn't. Finally, after some thought and comparing it to other projects I have come to accept the building because it is at least elegant in it's blandness. It's nothing special, but it's nothing like those "nautically inspired" sailboat towers we're seeing proposed everywhere. I hate to throw my hat in for mediocrity, but at least this building 1) Makes that area look less resort like 2) takes our city seriously and 3) is made of quality materials.

bushman61988 May 16, 2007 6:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spoonman (Post 2838201)
^They certainly sold it well didn't they

Yea they sold it well! That propoganda almost had me cheering for this tower. But after reading SDDTProspector's comment about it being a bland box, i came back to my senses...

This tower is NOT unique, and does NOT make that big a statement...for crying out loud, like someone said earlier, it looks like a brother of the Coporate Tower, and that Reed Silver (or whatever that name is) bldg.

I personally think if they would've just went with the old proposal for the site, which in my opinion is MUCH more unique, stand out, and world-class:
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y28...ntaFePlace.jpg

spoonman May 16, 2007 7:03 AM

Sorry, I can't take any more fins on buildings

spoonman May 16, 2007 7:06 AM

Before I get attacked ;) ...did anyone notice how far along the Hilton is?

Photo by SanDiegoUrban
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y12...s/IMG_8445.jpg

bushman61988 May 16, 2007 8:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spoonman (Post 2838257)
Sorry, I can't take any more fins on buildings

Personally, i really wouldnt consider this a fin, not even really a sail-like structure...it just flares up but it looks like it's part of the actual building and not just a crown.

Besides, what buildings in downtown San Diego today have fins, or anything that resembles fins???

bushman61988 May 16, 2007 8:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spoonman (Post 2838257)
Sorry, I can't take any more fins on buildings

Not that I'm trying to attack you, but I personally wouldnt consider these fins, or even sail-like structures. I say that cuz the renderings look like they're not even structures, but actually office parts of the building.
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y28...ntaFePlace.jpg

Besides, what fins do you see on buildings downtown?

SDCAL May 16, 2007 1:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bushman61988 (Post 2838331)
Not that I'm trying to attack you, but I personally wouldnt consider these fins, or even sail-like structures. I say that cuz the renderings look like they're not even structures, but actually office parts of the building.
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y28...ntaFePlace.jpg

Besides, what fins do you see on buildings downtown?


I think these renderings look better because the buildings aren't white. The really tacky nautical ones that make the skyline look cheap tend to be white and the "fins" look like they are placed on it as an afterthought, at least these encorporate the design into the whole building, but I guess it's a mute point since these are old proposals

The Cobb-Pei tower is nice, it's just not the stellar defining piece of architecture that would set us apart. It's difficult to create a design that is unique, out of the box, yet not tacky. And, with our height restricions, it's even harder because that aspect of drama is lost. People bring up the transamerica tower in SF. It is a uniquely designed building, but would it be as well known if it wasn't so tall??

With the conservative nature of the architecture and the only daring architecture tending to be "theme-like" coupled with the height restrictions which really must hinder and restrict architects in their design, we are a long, long ways from an iconic world-famous structure downtown I'm afraid :(

Derek May 16, 2007 1:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bmfarley (Post 2838193)

Anybody have any ideas of whats supposed to go in the "Existing Parking" next to Electra?

mongoXZ May 16, 2007 2:01 PM

^^I believe it's Bosa owned property.

On today's Union-Tribune:

Officials would like to attract NBA team
By Tanya Sierra
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

May 16, 2007

NATIONAL CITY – Now that the Chargers won't be relocating to National City, city officials are shifting their efforts to building a sports arena near the waterfront.


Advertisement City officials have been talking with Ernie Hahn II, who operates the San Diego Sports Arena, about bringing an arena to the 67-acre site the Chargers were considering.
Although no one would discuss details, Hahn said they would like the venue to house a National Basketball Association team.

The city's arena plans are preliminary. Officials need to secure financing, get buy-in from the Port of San Diego, which owns a majority of the site, and develop a land-use plan for the bayfront.

“There's always a struggle when you don't have a franchise, a team,” said National City Redevelopment Director Brad Raulston. “There's this chicken and egg between the team and the building. You need to have a building to lure the team.”

Officials say they prepared to develop the site as part of their stadium proposal. They surveyed residents and business owners and met with representatives of waterfront companies.

“The site has transportation advantages, a good location, and we understand the concerns of the maritime folks,” City Manager Chris Zapata said. “Coupled with the questionnaire, we realize there has to be a balance that is industry-and visitor-serving.”

Hahn started looking for new arena sites in 2003. He considered National City and Chula Vista, and said National City has the will and creativity to make an arena possible.

“I think they've got a very proactive management team from the mayor's office all the way down to redevelopment, which is always a positive,” Hahn said.

Although Hahn said he is focused on improving the San Diego Sports Arena, he's open to meeting with National City officials.

Last week, after Mayor Ron Morrison announced the city was dropping its bid to host a Chargers stadium, he said “discussions with a number of people” about a sports arena were under way.

Other than Hahn, city officials would not reveal names.

“There have been discussions and people are interested, but nobody is comfortable with going public on bringing a team to town,” Raulston said.

Past local sports arena proposals – in Chula Vista in 1973 and in downtown San Diego and Sorrento Valley in the early '90s – have failed.

In 2003, Hahn's Arena Group 2000 hired Raulston to help search for a new arena location. Raulston said that even without an arena, National City is poised to change its marina district.

“We need to figure out a way to make it more efficient, more lucrative and more recreational,” he said.

Raulston said an arena requires 5 to 7 acres, far less than a football stadium.

Members of the Working Waterfront Group, a coalition of maritime-industrial businesses, opposed a stadium at the site because they say it would harm their businesses. They also disapprove of an arena, said Sharon Cloward, executive director of the San Diego Port Tenants Association.

“We don't have enough land down there now,” Cloward said.

Morrison said the site is one of the last sites in the county that can accommodate an arena because of its freeway and public transportation access. He said he wants a comprehensive plan for the entire waterfront.

“We do not want the waterfront association or the maritime groups to think we're digging into their territory,” he said. “We're not. We want to make it better for them.”

mongoXZ May 16, 2007 2:05 PM

So this Pei Cobb tower was inspired by a 19th century Chicago building. :rolleyes:

Design of downtown high-rise unveiled
By Mike Freeman
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

May 16, 2007
http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniont.../irvine220.jpg



Architecture for the Irvine Co.'s 700 West Broadway was inspired by the Monadnock building in Chicago, built in 1893.
The Irvine Co. debuted what it calls a dignified rather than flashy design yesterday for its planned 34-story office tower in downtown San Diego, the latest proposed addition to the city's skyline.
The Orange County real estate giant, already the dominant landlord downtown, yesterday began showing off the proposed architecture for its 685,000-square-foot high-rise at Broadway and Pacific Highway.

The building, which Irvine is calling 700 West Broadway, would be the largest single office tower in the city's core on a square-footage basis. Construction is slated to begin as early as mid-2008 and take 2½ years to complete.

The initial plans were unveiled for a design committee of the Centre City Development Corp., the city's downtown redevelopment arm. The redevelopment agency must approve the design.

Henry N. Cobb, a co-founder of well-known New York architecture firm Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, has been hired as the lead designer on the building. Renowned architect I.M. Pei is also a founder of the firm.

Cobb, 81, has been the principal design partner on the John Hancock Tower in Boston, the U.S. Bank Tower in Los Angeles and the World Trade Center and Grand Marina Hotel, both in Barcelona, Spain.

The architecture was inspired by the Monadnock building in Chicago, built in 1893, Cobb said in a statement.

“I believe that 700 West Broadway will be elegant, characterized by calm, timeless and classic architecture that will be fresh and functional in 100 years,” he said. “It will stand with quiet authority, and be a pause in the visual landscape, a cornerstone.”



Advertisement Designing towers that stand out in the San Diego core can be tricky. The Federal Aviation Administration sets height limits on buildings because of downtown's proximity to Lindbergh Field. Many towers are roughly the same height, giving the city's skyline less vertical contrast than those of some other cities.
In January, Irvine bought the roughly 1½-acre site at the northeast corner of Broadway and Pacific Highway from Canadian condominium developer Nat Bosa. The company paid $60 million for the land, according to county deed records.

While Irvine won't reveal the cost of the tower, it would likely surpass $300 million, based on comparisons with other recent projects.

Irvine went with travertine stone siding rather than steel or concrete. The building will be 50 percent glass and 50 percent stone.

Among its features are a flared crown on the 480-foot structure, which is about 20 feet shorter than the city's most distinctive tower, One America Plaza, about one block east.

It also includes architectural features on the ground level that seek to tie in with the Santa Fe Depot next door.

A restaurant and fountain are earmarked for the ground floor along Broadway, with the main lobby fronting Pacific Highway. The building will meet energy-efficiency standards set by the U.S. Green Building Council.

Bradley Neil, Irvine's vice president of architecture for commercial property, said the classic design aims to make the tower “an anchor at this end of town.”

He said the skyline on downtown's west end is “fairly busy” with unusual rooflines at One America Plaza, Emerald Plaza and some proposed hotel projects on Lane Field, across Pacific Highway from Irvine's site.

Though most of its buildings are in Orange County, Irvine has made a major bet on San Diego commercial real estate in the past three years.

Best known as the developer of 93,000-acre Irvine Ranch, which today makes up a good portion of the city of Irvine, the company spent nearly $1 billion acquiring six of the roughly 12 top-quality office towers in downtown San Diego. Its holdings include One America Plaza, the Wells Fargo Building, Symphony Towers, the Koll Center and the NBC Building.

On top of its downtown deals, the company also spent an additional $1 billion this year to acquire the San Diego office portfolio of Equity Office Properties, which included several high-rises in University City. Irvine is now the top landlord in UTC as well as downtown.

The 700 West Broadway project would be Irvine's first development deal downtown – and it could put competitive pressure on Navy Broadway Complex developer Doug Manchester, who also plans offices in his project at the foot of Broadway and Harbor Drive.

keg92101 May 16, 2007 3:35 PM

[QUOTE=bushman61988;2838249]Yea they sold it well! That propoganda almost had me cheering for this tower. But after reading SDDTProspector's comment about it being a bland box, i came back to my senses...

This tower is NOT unique, and does NOT make that big a statement...for crying out loud, like someone said earlier, it looks like a brother of the Coporate Tower, and that Reed Silver (or whatever that name is) bldg.

I personally think if they would've just went with the old proposal for the site, which in my opinion is MUCH more unique, stand out, and world-class:

If you look at the night renderings of 700 W Broaday, and understand how much of an important role lighting plays in architecture, belive me, this building will stand out more than anything. They just want something that is timeless, which this building will be.

OCtoSD May 16, 2007 4:42 PM

I agree with this quote, the skyline was starting to get a little to flashy, with all the Vancouver buildings. This will add a quiet and interesting elegance. The Reed Elsevier building is a perfect box with no crown. This building goes in and out and then flares at the top. If you think this building is boring, Boston has 4 buildings that are boxy, and are the same color. That is annoying, this is classy and provides some variety, even to much flashy glass can be monotonous. Hopefully they will use some nice granite.

"The site demands and deserves a tower with great presence and integrity. I believe that 700 West Broadway will be elegant, characterized by calm, timeless and classic architecture that will be fresh and functional in 100 years. It will stand with quiet authority and be a pause in the visual landscape, a cornerstone"

eburress May 16, 2007 4:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Derek loves SD (Post 2838518)
Anybody have any ideas of whats supposed to go in the "Existing Parking" next to Electra?

That's going to be the "mystery tower" we've seen in so many renderings.

eburress May 16, 2007 5:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mongoXZ (Post 2838542)
^^I believe it's Bosa owned property.

On today's Union-Tribune:

Officials would like to attract NBA team
By Tanya Sierra
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

May 16, 2007

NATIONAL CITY – Now that the Chargers won't be relocating to National City, city officials are shifting their efforts to building a sports arena near the waterfront.


Advertisement City officials have been talking with Ernie Hahn II, who operates the San Diego Sports Arena, about bringing an arena to the 67-acre site the Chargers were considering.
Although no one would discuss details, Hahn said they would like the venue to house a National Basketball Association team.

The city's arena plans are preliminary. Officials need to secure financing, get buy-in from the Port of San Diego, which owns a majority of the site, and develop a land-use plan for the bayfront.

“There's always a struggle when you don't have a franchise, a team,” said National City Redevelopment Director Brad Raulston. “There's this chicken and egg between the team and the building. You need to have a building to lure the team.”

Officials say they prepared to develop the site as part of their stadium proposal. They surveyed residents and business owners and met with representatives of waterfront companies.

“The site has transportation advantages, a good location, and we understand the concerns of the maritime folks,” City Manager Chris Zapata said. “Coupled with the questionnaire, we realize there has to be a balance that is industry-and visitor-serving.”

Hahn started looking for new arena sites in 2003. He considered National City and Chula Vista, and said National City has the will and creativity to make an arena possible.

“I think they've got a very proactive management team from the mayor's office all the way down to redevelopment, which is always a positive,” Hahn said.

Although Hahn said he is focused on improving the San Diego Sports Arena, he's open to meeting with National City officials.

Last week, after Mayor Ron Morrison announced the city was dropping its bid to host a Chargers stadium, he said “discussions with a number of people” about a sports arena were under way.

Other than Hahn, city officials would not reveal names.

“There have been discussions and people are interested, but nobody is comfortable with going public on bringing a team to town,” Raulston said.

Past local sports arena proposals – in Chula Vista in 1973 and in downtown San Diego and Sorrento Valley in the early '90s – have failed.

In 2003, Hahn's Arena Group 2000 hired Raulston to help search for a new arena location. Raulston said that even without an arena, National City is poised to change its marina district.

“We need to figure out a way to make it more efficient, more lucrative and more recreational,” he said.

Raulston said an arena requires 5 to 7 acres, far less than a football stadium.

Members of the Working Waterfront Group, a coalition of maritime-industrial businesses, opposed a stadium at the site because they say it would harm their businesses. They also disapprove of an arena, said Sharon Cloward, executive director of the San Diego Port Tenants Association.

“We don't have enough land down there now,” Cloward said.

Morrison said the site is one of the last sites in the county that can accommodate an arena because of its freeway and public transportation access. He said he wants a comprehensive plan for the entire waterfront.

“We do not want the waterfront association or the maritime groups to think we're digging into their territory,” he said. “We're not. We want to make it better for them.”

An NBA team is one of the MAIN things the SD area is lacking, IMO. Although I would prefer a downtown arena, a NC waterfront arena would be nice too.

SDCAL May 16, 2007 7:11 PM

By Mike Freeman
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

"The Federal Aviation Administration sets height limits on buildings because of downtown's proximity to Lindbergh Field. Many towers are roughly the same height, giving the city's skyline less vertical contrast than those of some other cities".


A nice way of saying our skyline is starting to look like a plateau with no dramaric height. At least the mainstream media is acknowledging it, maybe it will start getting people to think about the potential of our skyline if a few over 500ft buildings were allowed to punctuate it

The say the FAA, but I thought there was a local law?? I wonder if developers can challenge the height restriction? Obviously if it's an FAA restriction they would never OK something really tall, but even if we could start with something 550-600 ft at least it would give the skyline some depth!!!

SDCAL May 16, 2007 7:28 PM

SD airport
 
A fedral study of airports, this article is in all the major national media publications, San Diego named one of US cities that must solve it's airport problem or face lost revenue in the near future. It really irritates me that we have some many jackasses in this city who think Lindergh is fine the way it is. This was a national study by the FAA, do these fools who are against a new airport think people are making this up??????????????? !!!!

FAA: U.S. airports must expand to meet demand
Posted 21h 8m ago | Comments 20 | Recommend 12 E-mail | Save | Print |




ATLANTA — A number of major U.S. cities must expand existing airports in the next two decades, build new ones or find other solutions to meet an increasing demand for air travel, according to a federal report released Tuesday.
The Federal Aviation Administration released the latest version of its study, titled "Capacity Needs in the National Airspace System." The report examined anticipated changes to airport capacity through 2025, and said city airports including Atlanta, Las Vegas, Chicago and San Diego need to expand soon.

Against the backdrop of the world's busiest airfield, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters on Tuesday praised Atlanta and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport for building another runway and new air traffic control towers. Peters also announced a $1 million grant to study further capacity expansion in Atlanta.

"By 2025, cities like Atlanta, Las Vegas, Chicago and San Diego are going to risk the lost revenue, lost business and lost appeal that comes with chronic delay," Peters said. "Atlanta's leaders will have to embrace new airports and new ways of thinking."

Federal Aviation Administration Administrator Marion Blakey said Tuesday that the current number of air passengers is "sounding a siren that must be responded to" with a regional approach.

FIND MORE STORIES IN: Tuesday | Atlanta | Federal Aviation Administration | Airports | Cities | Peters | Capacity | Federal report
Airports in Boston, Cleveland, Los Angeles, St. Louis and Minneapolis-St. Paul have also recently opened new runways.

The FAA study began in 2003 reviewing 291 commercial service airports, and whittled that down to the 56 most at risk of overcapacity.

After the completion of the first version of this study in 2004, it was recommended that Atlanta expand immediately. The city made substantial improvements since, but aviation officials warned it will need to address growing passenger demand before 2025.

Four airports were identified as needing to expand capacity immediately, including New York's LaGuardia Airport, Newark Liberty International, O'Hare International Airport and Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International.


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