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-   -   SAN DIEGO | Boom Rundown, Vol. 2 (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=126473)

OneMetropolis May 21, 2010 3:36 PM

Too bad that it would never be built.

kpexpress May 22, 2010 8:41 AM

wow i thought for sure that as soon as the chargers released a rendering of the stadium in the east village it would start a whirlwind of debate and discussion.....damn may grey

HurricaneHugo May 22, 2010 9:58 AM

This is a whirlwind for this thread lol

sandiegodweller May 22, 2010 3:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4849590)
wow i thought for sure that as soon as the chargers released a rendering of the stadium in the east village it would start a whirlwind of debate and discussion.....damn may grey

OK, I'll start.

The stadium looks good, I like the design. How wmuch will the PSL's be for the 50 yardline Plaza seats behind the Charger bench?

They should choose lighter colored seats so they don't get hot.

I hope they have lots of bathrooms.

Where will they put the steakhouse and sushi restaraunts?

I don't see a massive HDTV scoreboard hanging over the field. How will I be able to enjoy the game?

Will they name it Father Joe's Stadium?

The multiple Affordable Housing projects surrounding the site that have been constructed in the past few years will be prime property. Maybe the tenants can sublease their homes on game days for folks who want to party before the game.

If I park in Lemon Grove to avoid traffic, which trolley will I need to take?

On a serious note, beisdes a pretty rendering, what has changed in the 72 hours since this was revealed?

Once they identify a way to pay for land acquisition, remediation of toxics, relocation of the MTS, a location for the MTS and construction of the stadium then we might have a project to discuss. Until then, what it there to say?

HurricaneHugo May 23, 2010 5:18 AM

As for relocating the MTS site, I heard somewhere that they might buy the land of the Midway post office that is relocating to RB(?) or somewhere north.

SD_Phil May 24, 2010 8:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4849590)
wow i thought for sure that as soon as the chargers released a rendering of the stadium in the east village it would start a whirlwind of debate and discussion.....damn may grey

Here's some:

1. I like the stadium, I don't love it but think it's completely adequate

2. I don't really want it so close to Petco but

3. I really get excited when I think about the kind of development that it might spur in the east village. That place needs it. SD needs an alternative to the mostly fake, showy, gaslamp.

HurricaneHugo May 25, 2010 6:25 AM

but but but but it will kill the very LIVELY east village neighborhood!

those homeless will be upset when they have to talk around the stadium!

kpexpress May 25, 2010 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sandiegodweller (Post 4849741)
OK, I'll start.

The stadium looks good, I like the design. How wmuch will the PSL's be for the 50 yardline Plaza seats behind the Charger bench?

They should choose lighter colored seats so they don't get hot.

I hope they have lots of bathrooms.

Where will they put the steakhouse and sushi restaraunts?

I don't see a massive HDTV scoreboard hanging over the field. How will I be able to enjoy the game?

Will they name it Father Joe's Stadium?

The multiple Affordable Housing projects surrounding the site that have been constructed in the past few years will be prime property. Maybe the tenants can sublease their homes on game days for folks who want to party before the game.

If I park in Lemon Grove to avoid traffic, which trolley will I need to take?

On a serious note, beisdes a pretty rendering, what has changed in the 72 hours since this was revealed?

Once they identify a way to pay for land acquisition, remediation of toxics, relocation of the MTS, a location for the MTS and construction of the stadium then we might have a project to discuss. Until then, what it there to say?

The seats for sure should be baby blue (charger blue) that would solve the problem.

I hope the stadium doesn't get a huge screen suspended above the field like Dallas'. I would love to see the super block just to the North divided into two blocks with a wide pedestrian street running North/South starting at the endzone of the north side of the field. If they did that, there would be a fantastic opportunity to place a dual facing mega screen along the north side of the stadium visible not only to the stadium patrons but to the thousands of people who would frequent the bars and restaurants along the pedestrian street mentioned earlier. Think gas lamp vibrancy around a sport theme. The excitement would spill out around the stadium and into the whole EV.

People need to be thinking about larger planning scope of putting the stadium there. Could be super neat and exciting, then again it could be a desolate/isolated 'sports arena'. think about it.

SDfan May 27, 2010 2:51 AM

In an off related topic, does anyone know what happend to Sunroad Enterprises? I can't find any website for them.

sandiegodweller May 27, 2010 5:24 PM

Interesting gallery of dreams
 
I can think of a few others that didn't make this list.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/photos...st-renderings/

Crackertastik May 27, 2010 6:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sandiegodweller (Post 4855974)
I can think of a few others that didn't make this list.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/photos...st-renderings/


Im not sure why the Library and the City Hall Renderings are on this link. The city hall will be voted on (i know it will likely fail to pass) but it isn't dead YET. and the library i thought was moving forward with the school co-op. And as far as i know the convention center expansion is on the track to be built.

Also, the Chula Vista rendering of the Charger Stadium Proposal is not a correct rendering, i do not believe. The stadium looks like a baseball field, and there is no reason for a bridge in chula vista (crossing over to the silver strand?).

This is a weird list.

mello May 27, 2010 9:53 PM

Thoughts on the stadium
 
I definitely agree that the whole area needs to be redesigned in to small walkable blocks and some highrises need to be built near the stadium to make it not stick out like a sore thumb and give it a sense of scale within the downtown urban environment. It would look terrible just sitting there with a bunch of ramshackle crappy business around it.

I also wish it could be oriented better to catch views of the downtown skyline. As it sits now the view corridor will be to the North but from that far East you won't capture any tall buildings just the area East of Vantage Point... Too bad they can't tilt it so the endzone can look more to the North West instead of directly North.

And that list is whack by Dweller/Union Tribune. There are so many other projects that are definitely dead from the boom days back in 04 thru 06.

brantw May 28, 2010 10:20 PM

Six-lane addition proposed to ease daily I-5 backups
 
I know this has nothing to do with Skyscrapers, but not much else going on.

Interstate 5 would grow by as many as six lanes — including a roadway-within-a-roadway for car pools, buses and toll-paying solo drivers — under a plan crafted by transportation officials.

http://media.signonsandiego.com/img/...34634cbc5420f3

Four lanes would be built along the middle of the freeway between La Jolla Village Drive and north Oceanside, similar to the express-lane network on Interstate 15. Two conventional lanes could be added to the regular segment of the coastal freeway as well.

Caltrans plans to release an environmental study on the project as soon as late June and then stage a series of public hearings. Cost estimates for the expansion range from $3.3 billion to $4.5 billion.

When San Diego County voters in 2004 renewed a local half-cent sales tax to pay for transportation improvements, the expansion of I-5 was among the projects given high priority. An ordinance tied to the ballot measure called for the addition of “managed lanes,” although it didn’t specifically say solo drivers would pay a toll.

Daily traffic on the 30-mile stretch between San Diego and Oceanside averages 700,000 vehicles, from short hops to long-distance commutes. Caltrans expects that figure to swell to a million cars by 2030.

The summer-vacation season that starts today burdens the freeway even more as tourists, commuters, Del Mar horse-racing fans and others jockey for space along the main link between the region and the rest of metropolitan Southern California.

“It’s not your basic urban freeway,” said Allan Kosup, who oversees the roadway for Caltrans. “Interstate 5 is sort of a gateway to San Diego.”

Officials at Caltrans and the San Diego Association of Governments, the region’s long-range-planning agency, expect the expansion plan to draw much public scrutiny. They note that it would affect — at a minimum — the half-million people who live along the North Coast corridor.

The project would run through six cities and require the construction of 40 bridges and overpasses, along with noise-reduction walls next to more than 1,500 homes, including apartment complexes, according to Caltrans.

Encinitas Councilman Jerome Stocks, a member of the SANDAG board of directors, says he believes traffic-weary residents will welcome the work.

“I have people coming to me all the time and saying, ‘When are you going to fix this?’ ” he said. “The congestion wait times are out of whack.”

According to data from freeway sensors, the worst rush-hour choke points last year were on southbound I-5 at Oceanside Boulevard, northbound at Via de la Valle in Del Mar and northbound at Lomas Santa Fe in Solana Beach. The Oceanside Boulevard stretch was backed up on 132 days last year.

Charles “Muggs” Stoll, SANDAG’s director of land use and transportation planning, said residents shouldn’t be surprised by the project. “It’s something that’s long been discussed … and fits in with our overall regional transportation plan,” he said.

Half the money needed for construction would come from TransNet sales tax revenue. SANDAG wants to secure the rest from state and federal sources.

The exact cost hinges on the number of lanes built and the layout. Caltrans officials say the soon-to-be-released environmental study will lay out four options.

The most expensive would cost $4.5 billion and add four toll lanes, separated by concrete barriers from the rest of I-5, along with two conventional lanes along the existing shoulders. The least costly, at $3.3 billion, would add only the four middle lanes, separated by yellow stripes from the rest of the roadway.

Other transportation improvements are also in the works on the North Coast, including expanding the Coaster railway service.

Caltrans is in the middle of a major expansion of the Interstate 15 network that allows drivers to pay tolls on an account with a FasTrak transponder. By 2012, four express lanes will run between San Diego and Escondido. The project’s cost: $1.3 billion.

Recent U.S. Census figures show that the percentage of commuters in the county who carpool or vanpool has dropped to 13 percent from 15 percent in 2000. SANDAG officials have reported that traffic counts on I-15, including the FasTrak lanes, have dipped during the recession — a trend that other toll road operators have also noted.

The drop in traffic has raised questions about whether toll roads or high-occupancy lanes are worth building, but transportation planners say they will eventually pay off, once the economy fully rebounds.

Money raised through I-15 tolls — which average $1.20 one way — covers FasTrak operations and funds transit services along the highway, including express-bus routes.

Kosup said the I-5 expansion would require constructing “flyover” ramps that would feed into the express lanes and building replacement bridges that would span environmentally sensitive areas.

He said Caltrans is already talking to the California Coastal Commission and other agencies on ways to minimize or mitigate the project’s impact.

Dick Bobertz, executive director of the San Dieguito River Park, said his group has already struck an agreement with Caltrans that would require highway officials to restore 107 acres of wetlands as part of the project.

Caltrans officials say the ribbon of oleander plants in the I-5 median would remain, even with the addition of FasTrak lanes.

Derek May 29, 2010 4:43 AM

How about making the transition from 5 South to 56 East a little easier first, as well as 56 West to 5 North!

HurricaneHugo May 29, 2010 9:59 PM

I've always thought that an entrance/exit at Voigt Drive would be nice to avoid the clusterfuck that is LJVD getting out of UCSD.

I'm not sure how they're going to expand the 5 right there though since it's in a valley.

And can we also start putting lids on the 5!

eburress May 29, 2010 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Derek (Post 4858208)
How about making the transition from 5 South to 56 East a little easier first, as well as 56 West to 5 North!

This is already going to happen. Pardee Homes is paying for the construction of direct connector ramps, independent of the I-5 widening project.

Derek May 30, 2010 2:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eburress (Post 4858830)
This is already going to happen. Pardee Homes is paying for the construction of direct connector ramps, independent of the I-5 widening project.


Oh ok. :laugh:

dl3000 May 31, 2010 5:39 AM

If only the money could go to some ass kickin trains.

brantw Jun 2, 2010 4:19 AM

Stalled port plan has new mediator
 
Proponents and opponents of San Diego’s waterfront improvement plan, which was stalled by the California Coastal Commission, have agreed to sit down next week to seek consensus on the long-delayed, $228 million effort.

The local chapter of the Urban Land Institute announced the talks Tuesday, and David Malmuth, a San Diego developer responsible for completing landmark projects in New York City and Hollywood, will co-moderate three public meetings with former city architect Michael Stepner.

Speaking to the local chapter of Lambda Alpha International, a real estate honorary society, Malmuth said he was “enormously discouraged” by the commission’s April 14 tie vote, which derailed the $28 million first phase of improvements to the north Embarcadero along Harbor Drive. But then he approached the San Diego Unified Port District; ULI, a Washington-based think tank; and Citizens Coordinate for Century 3, a long-standing San Diego activist group that opposed the port plan.

“I think there is an opportunity for a neutral party to bring people together,” Malmuth said.

He also outlined a four-day “Art San Diego” fair that he’s organizing on the model of similar shows in Switzerland and Miami Beach. In addition, he proposed that Balboa Park celebrate the 2015 centennial of the Panama-California Exposition with a festival similar to Venice’s famed Biennale.

While he was at The Walt Disney Co. in the 1990s, Malmuth, 55, played a key role in restoring the New Amsterdam Theater as a catalyst for cleaning up New York City’s Times Square. He next worked for TrizecHahn, developer of the Horton Plaza shopping center, to upgrade the center of Hollywood with the Hollywood & Highland Center mixed-use project — home of the Kodak Theatre, host venue for the Academy Awards and “American Idol” finals. Both the New York and Hollywood efforts had languished for years.

He moved to San Diego 15 years ago and has overseen other landmark commercial projects, but none locally. However, with success achieved elsewhere, he said arts and culture can serve as an economic driver of San Diego’s future, just as they do in Miami , Chicago, Denver and other cities. That will be the focus for his new company, David Malmuth Development.

“It’s certainly good for city-building,” he said.

Malmuth said that what’s missing in San Diego waterfront planning is programming and management of activities within the open spaces that various developments would include. He spoke of dance and music performances on Navy Pier, next to the USS Midway Museum, and public access on the upper levels of any new cruise-ship terminal that might be located at B Street Pier.

But it’s the future of Broadway Pier, where a second cruise-ship terminal is under construction, that has galvanized port critics. They complain that a parklike terminus to Broadway has been lost in the current development — one of the reasons cited by Coastal Commission members in their April vote.

Malmuth said the local ULI chapter agreed to hold three public meetings to rethink the plan and come up with a “compelling vision” that most people could endorse.

“The downtown waterfront is our most precious real estate, and it presents a unique opportunity to create a special place that is cherished by all San Diegans,” said ULI Executive Director Mary Lydon. “We feel it is time to pull the community together to search for common ground and a shared vision.”

Stephen Haase, president of Citizens Coordinate for Century 3, said his group intends to participate in the workshops but expects the port waterfront plan to change direction if its proponents want the backing of C-3 and other environmental groups.

Meanwhile, Malmuth is organizing “Art San Diego,” a contemporary art fair Sept. 2-5 at the San Diego Hilton Bayfront that’s modeled on Art Basel in Switzerland and Art Basel Miami Beach. Those events draw tens of thousands of collectors and artists, and include related events for the public.

“It’s spring break for billionaires,” Malmuth said of the Miami Beach and Basel shows.

His event in San Diego, with a ticket price of $15 ($250 for VIPs), will feature more than 50 international galleries, luxury brand displays, citywide cultural programs, and wine and food events. An “Arts in the City” symposium is planned concurrently to present speakers from other cities who will lay out ways to implement an art and culture development plan.

“It won’t just be a gabfest,” Malmuth said.

He also suggested that in five years, Balboa Park should host Venice-type pavilions that show off San Diego’s international leadership in art, science and technology.

Lyz Crane, director of program development at Partners for Livable Communities, a Washington-based planning organization, said the megaprojects of the past 20 years, such as convention centers and stadiums, haven’t yielded the economic and social improvements that the arts, especially at the neighborhood level, continue to produce around the country. Festivals and special events also are problematic because of the costs of infrastructure and setup, she said.

“But there can also be benefits that come out of it if you’re improving the infrastructure because of the event and just not for the event,” Crane said.

ChargerFan Jun 2, 2010 7:59 AM

Caltrans: Yesterday's solutions for tomorrow's problems.


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