SkyscraperPage Forum

SkyscraperPage Forum (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/index.php)
-   Never Built & Visionary Projects (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/forumdisplay.php?f=342)
-   -   NEW YORK | NYSE Tower | 1,792 FT / 546 M | 140 FLOORS | NEVER BUILT (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=151098)

Stratosphere May 14, 2008 9:47 AM

NEW YORK | NYSE Tower | 1,792 FT / 546 M | 140 FLOORS | NEVER BUILT
 
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u.../nysetower.jpg

August 13, 1996

Trump plans NYSE tower
Exchange mulls move into proposed record-breaking skyscraper


NEW YORK (CNNfn) -- Donald Trump is planning to build the world's tallest building at the end of Wall Street to house the New York Stock Exchange, according to published reports.

The 140-story New York Stock Exchange Tower, as the building would be named, would have 3 1/2 million square feet of office space, house up to 100,000 office workers and take 3 1/2 years to build.

At 1,792 feet tall, the proposed building would extend far above the neighboring World Trade Center, currently the fifth tallest building in the world.

"For Trump this is the ultimate," the New York Post quoted a Trump family friend as saying. "Donald is obsessed with that fact that New York should have the world's tallest building."

On Monday, the NYSE said it was mulling a move from its historic Wall Street headquarters, a 93-year-old building.

Both City Hall and NYSE Chief Executive Richard Grasso reportedly greeted the plan with "huge enthusiasm," citing the advantages of bringing the tallest building status back to the Big Apple.

Trump's NYSE plan is designed by architects Kohn Pedersen Fox, the same firm that designed Malaysia's skyscrapers.

The "Guinness Book of World Records" says the tallest building and free-standing tower in the world is the 1,815-foot-tall CN Tower in Toronto. The Oriental Pearl TV Tower in Shanghai, China, currently checks in as the world's biggest skyscraper at 1,534 feet tall.


*********************************

A tall order, even for Trump

Bloomberg Business News

Donald Trump is back in the public eye with a proposal to build the world's tallest building in Manhattan to house the New York Stock Exchange.

Trump told the New York Post that if the NYSE decides to move to another location -- the exchange announced this week that it's considering such a move -- he would build it a new home just a few blocks away from the exchange's current cramped digs at 18 Broad St.

Trump's plan, which has not been accepted by the exchange, calls for a 140-story building that would rise 1,792 feet tall -- to commemorate the exchange's founding in 1792.

Building the tower might be the easy part because Trump would still have to find tenants.

"Clearly, the market has too much available space as it is," said Howard Grufferman, a New York real estate broker. "It's a little premature to be doing out of the ground construction."

A more likely scenario, Grufferman said, would be for the exchange to move into an existing building.


http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u...yse_vs_wtc.jpg

http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u...nyse_sears.jpg

M II A II R II K May 14, 2008 9:09 PM

It was the damn FAA wasn't it...

Stratosphere May 14, 2008 11:06 PM

Personally, I think it looks more majestic and has more grace than the Freedom Tower. This should have been THE Freedom Tower.

Jibba May 15, 2008 6:27 AM

As far as the whole splicing-two-boxes-together-offset-at-forty-five-degree-angles-from-each-other design template goes, I prefer the Freedom Tower: it's definitely not as majestic, but it has more presence and brawn.

Swede May 15, 2008 8:45 AM

This is the building I thought of first when I saw the designs for the Freedom Tower. I prefer the Trump NYSE for its height and slenderness, but the Freedom Tower for its more subtle slenderness (only from some angles) and the viewing platform up top. A shame the Trump NYSE didn't get built.

navyweaxguy May 15, 2008 7:05 PM

Lol a Trump tower that people actually like

MolsonExport May 16, 2008 4:10 PM

I still prefer Foster's original twin tower proposal:
http://www.september11news.com/WTC12...erPartners.jpg

M II A II R II K May 16, 2008 4:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MolsonExport (Post 3556745)
I still prefer Foster's original twin tower proposal:
http://www.september11news.com/WTC12...erPartners.jpg

Me 2.

But am not disappointed with what we'll get.

Stratosphere May 16, 2008 7:09 PM

Looks crooked and doesn't blend in very well with the rest of the skyline.

FrancoRey May 16, 2008 7:27 PM

And to many the Chicago Spire looks twisted and outta place in Chicago's skyline. But, meh. To all their own. :)

DetroitSky May 17, 2008 6:36 PM

This design reminds me a lot of the old Grollo Tower proposal in Melbourne.

emathias Aug 23, 2008 5:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stratosphere (Post 3551560)
...

The 140-story New York Stock Exchange Tower, as the building would be named, would have 3 1/2 million square feet of office space, house up to 100,000 office workers and take 3 1/2 years to build.
...

100,000 workers in 3,500,000 square feet? Only 35 square feet per worker? Probably only 24 per worker after you subtract out hallways and such? I find that really hard to believe, even by cramped cubicle standards. Not to mention how would you move 100,000 people in and out of one relatively thin building in a day? Sears Tower has about 10,000 workers, and it has over 4 million square feet, so I'm assuming that 100,000 was a typo.

JDRCRASH Aug 24, 2008 7:48 PM

I like the building....but I don't like the location.

bbeliko Aug 31, 2008 4:51 AM

It looks very much like the freedom, classier, but still alike

NYguy Jan 13, 2009 1:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by emathias (Post 3753578)
100,000 workers in 3,500,000 square feet? Only 35 square feet per worker? Probably only 24 per worker after you subtract out hallways and such? I find that really hard to believe, even by cramped cubicle standards. Not to mention how would you move 100,000 people in and out of one relatively thin building in a day? Sears Tower has about 10,000 workers, and it has over 4 million square feet, so I'm assuming that 100,000 was a typo.

I think that was just a misquote in the press. The actual NYSE wouldn't have been located in the tower, but in the smaller lowerise structure next to it. It was probably a referenct to the complex as a whole.

The NYSE ultimately decided to build their own tower, and was well on their way (with help from the city and state) to building a 900 ft tower accross the street from its current headquarters. Then came 9/11, and that tower was canceled out of fears.

NYguy Jan 13, 2009 1:23 AM

Quote:

At 1,792 feet tall, the proposed building would extend far above the neighboring World Trade Center, currently the fifth tallest building in the world.

"For Trump this is the ultimate," the New York Post quoted a Trump family friend as saying. "Donald is obsessed with that fact that New York should have the world's tallest building."

I don't know about that, but it would be a shame if Donald Trump couldn't get a supertall approved in New York. I don't think any developer has worked harder to get one.

Quote:

Trump's plan, which has not been accepted by the exchange, calls for a 140-story building that would rise 1,792 feet tall -- to commemorate the exchange's founding in 1792.
Freedom Tower follows this lead....

scalziand Jan 14, 2009 4:21 AM

Judging by the rendering, this would have required the demolition of 1 Financial Square, 77 Water Street, the Police Museum and part of 55 Water Street.

NYguy Jan 14, 2009 1:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scalziand (Post 4023539)
Judging by the rendering, this would have required the demolition of 1 Financial Square, 77 Water Street, the Police Museum and part of 55 Water Street.

If I'm not mistaken, this was proposed to be built east of the FDR.

NYguy Jan 14, 2009 1:38 PM

13 years ago...

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpag...0of%20Business

New York Stock Exchange Considers a Move, but Not From Manhattan


By ALAN FINDER
August 13, 1996

Trying to accommodate strong growth in recent years, officials at the New York Stock Exchange said yesterday that they were thinking about relocating to expanded headquarters somewhere in Manhattan.

The stock exchange, one of New York City's prime economic engines and the leading symbol of its claim as a world financial capital, has not decided whether to move, or where, said a spokesman, Ray Pellecchia. But one decision has been made: the exchange will not move to New Jersey or elsewhere outside the city, Mr. Pellecchia and city officials said.

Consideration of a new home for the exchange, which was reported yesterday by The New York Post, is prompted by a need for larger and more modern quarters, according to several New York real estate executives. The exchange, founded in 1792, has been at Wall and Broad streets for 93 years and has long been a popular tourist attraction.

Officials at the exchange declined to discuss possible sites, but several real estate executives said the exchange would need a huge trading floor, perhaps as large as 120,000 square feet -- about three times the size of a floor in the Met Life Building next to Grand Central Terminal. That requirement, along with the need for considerable space for computers and auxiliary services, would rule out virtually all existing office buildings in lower Manhattan, the executives said.

An option under consideration is tearing down an old office building at 2 Broadway, near Battery Park, and constructing a new headquarters there, according to the real estate executives. Another possibility would be putting up a vast building at the eastern end of Wall Street, over the East River. The developer Donald J. Trump has proposed that site to the exchange, the real estate executives said.

The city, and not Mr. Trump, controls the waterfront there, just south of the South Street Seaport and two piers with indoor tennis courts.


Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, who has offered tax incentives to prevent other markets from moving, said yesterday that he met two weeks ago with Richard A. Grasso, the chairman and chief executive of the exchange, to discuss the possibility of a new home.

Mr. Grasso made it clear that the exchange was committed to New York City, Mr. Giuliani said, and would not seek to maximize tax breaks and other incentives from the city and state by pretending that it was considering a move to New Jersey or Connecticut.

The Mayor said Mr. Grasso had told him that the exchange wanted ''a larger, more modern location.''

Since then, city and exchange officials have discussed many possible sites, Mr. Giuliani said, adding that the talks would probably continue for at least three or four months.

''My most important objective is to keep the stock exchange in the city of New York,'' the Mayor said. ''That is one of our anchors that makes us the financial capital of the world.''

''I would prefer to see them in lower Manhattan,'' he said. ''I think they would prefer to stay in lower Manhattan, but then they have to look at other options as well, and we have to give them the flexibility to do that.''

The Giuliani administration, like its recent predecessors, has offered substantial tax abatements and other financial incentives to keep major employers in the city. Last year, the New York Cotton Exchange, which had decided to move to Jersey City, agreed to join the Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange in moving from their current home, in the World Trade Center, to a new building at Murray and Greenwich streets in TriBeCa. The city offered $98 million in incentives to both exchanges to remain in New York.

When asked at a news conference how much aid would be required to help the stock exchange relocate within the city, Mr. Giuliani said it was too soon to know. ''We haven't made a deal yet, and I don't know what it's going to take to have them accomplish the facility that they need,'' he said.

The stock exchange has considered moving before. Three years ago, officials of the exchange considered a proposal to relocate across the street, said Louis Rudin, a developer who was part of the team of developers and consultants that devised the plan. Under the proposal, an office building at 23 Wall Street and a full block of neighboring buildings would have been razed, and a new trading floor and headquarters would have been built for the New York Stock Exchange and the American Stock Exchange.

In the end, senior officials of the exchange decided to remain in their current building, according to Mr. Rudin, whose family real estate company owns a number of nearby office buildings.

''Our primary effort is to keep the stock exchange downtown in New York,'' he said, ''and there is no reason, we think, to believe that they won't be there.''

STERNyc Jan 14, 2009 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYguy (Post 4024084)
If I'm not mistaken, this was proposed to be built east of the FDR.

Correct you can see 1 Financial Square behind it.

Too bad this wasn't built.

But there's alot of what if's.

The WTC was attacked because they were symbols of Americas economic might. If this was built not too far away and being taller and connected to the NYSE perhaps this would have been attacked instead.


All times are GMT. The time now is 1:37 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.